midterm review - final copy

Week 5 charity girls a term that differentiated them

Info icon This preview shows pages 51–54. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Week 5 charity girls a term that differentiated them from prostitutes because they did not accept money in their sexual encounters with men these charity girls often comprised half or more of the dancers in a hall they were still defined as respectable generally young; many of them lived at home with their families - many young women defined themselves sharply against the freer sexuality of their pleasure- seeking sisters, associating “respectability” firmly with premarital chastity and circumspect behavior - women who freely attended “dubious resorts” or bore illegitimate children were often stigmatized by neighbors and workmates - many women increasingly found premarital intercourse acceptable in particular situations - women would have had to weigh their desire for social participation against traditional sanctions regarding sexual behavior, and charity girls offered to some a model for resolving this conflict - other women, who might view charity girls as promiscuous, were untroubled by premarital intimacy with a steady boyfriend - commercial amusements offered a tempting world of pleasure and companionship beyond parental control
Image of page 51

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Week 6 Key Concepts 1. four main types of culturally constructed male homosexuality (1) childhood play – nearly universal (i.e. Mehinaku) (2) pedophilia – age structured male initiation (i.e. Ancient Athenians) (3) gender bending – alternative or third-gender person may have sex with a man (i.e. Hijras) (4) homophilia – between adult men who are the same gender (in Western culture, now becoming global) 2. historical background of sodomy legislation in Britain sodomy was variously defined but always forbidden the charge of sodomy, although possible between men and women, usually was made against same gender acts o sometimes included women with women o sometimes only “passive” male partner or “active” female partner was guilty enforcement was sporadic, but punishment was often severe Renaissance England (1600-1700) o acts of sodomy were associated with heretics and blasphemers o sodomy violated God’s orders o most sodomy cases that reached the courts involved men and youths in: extended households universities and schools London world of theater the theater was suspect women were not allowed on stage, so boys played these roles there were rumors and gossip about these boys
Image of page 52
Week 6 churches denounced theaters and playwrights, the Puritans banned theater completely prostitution 1800s o imposition of the medical model on the Christian model o sodomy was termed “inversion” by Krafft-Ebing o he associated it with a global identity of the “invert” o trapped soul theory: inverts were supposedly women trapped in men’s bodies or the reverse the last execution for sodomy occurred in 1835 in 1861, the death penalty was repealed and replaced by penal servitude of 10 years to life o this was the sodomy law in England until 1967 3. molly house raids of 1699
Image of page 53

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 54
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern