Chapter 102 exercise question 20 refer back to the

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Chapter 10.2 Exercise Question 20 Refer back to the previous exercise. Recall that the data file ScrabbleRatio contains Scrabble points for a student's name and the corresponding ratio of Scrabble points to number of letters. Enter the data into the Corr/Regression applet and conduct a simulation-based test of significance. Report the approximate p-value. The p-value is about 0.0006. Interpret the p-value reported in part (a). If there is no association between name lengths and their scores, the probability we would get a sample correlation coefficient at least as extreme as 0.782 is about 0.0006. Summarize your conclusion (significance, causation, generalizability) from this simulation analysis. Also describe the reasoning process by which your conclusion follows from your simulation results. We have strong evidence (p − value < 0 .001 ) that there is an association between Scrabble points per letter of names and their Scrabble score and that that relationship is positive. We might cautiously generalize these results to statistics students like those in this study but we are not drawing any cause-and-effect conclusions from this observational study. Chapter 10.2 Exercise Question 21 TV and life expectancy Recall from Exercise 10.1.22 that the data file TVLife provides information on life expectancy and number of televisions per thousand people in a sample of 22 countries, as reported by the 2006 World Almanac and Book of Facts. State in words the appropriate null and alternative hypotheses to test whether there is an association between the life expectancy and number of televisions per thousand people in such countries.
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Describe how one might use everyday items (for example, coins, dice, cards, etc.) to conduct a tactile simulation-based test of the hypotheses. Be sure to clearly describe how the p-value will be computed from the simulation. Chapter 10.2 Exercise Question 22 Refer back to the previous exercise. Recall that the data file TVLife provides information on life expectancy and number of televisions per thousand people in a sample of 22 countries, as reported by the 2006 World Almanac and Book of Facts. Enter the data into the Corr/Regression applet and conduct a simulation-based test of significance. Report the approximate p-value. Interpret the p-value reported in part (a). Summarize your conclusion (significance, causation, generalizability) from this simulation analysis. Also describe the reasoning process by which your conclusion follows from your simulation results. Chapter 10.2 Exercise Question 23 In 1970, the United States Selective Service conducted a lottery to decide which young men would be drafted into the armed forces (Fienberg, 1971). Each of the 366 birthdays in a year (including February 29) was assigned a draft number. Young men born on days assigned low draft numbers were drafted. We will regard the 366 dates of the year as observational units. We will consider two variables recorded on each date: draft number assigned to the date and sequential date in the year (so January 31 is sequential date 31, February 1 is sequential date 32, and so on). There is a parameter in the draft lottery example.
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  • Summer '18
  • Null hypothesis, Statistical hypothesis testing, Correlation and dependence, Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient

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