Nor does it hold in periodic sentences in which the

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is interrupted only by a relative clause or by an expression in apposition. Nor does ithold in periodic sentences in which the interruption is a deliberately used means ofcreating suspense (see examples under Rule 18).The relative pronoun should come, as a rule, immediately after its antecedent.There was a look in his eye thatboded mischief.In his eye was a look that bodedmischief.He wrote three articles abouthis adventures in Spain, whichwerepublishedinHarper’sMagazine.He published inHarper’s Mag-azinethree articles about hisadventures in Spain.This is a portrait of BenjaminHarrison, grandson of WilliamHenry Harrison, who becamePresident in 1889.This is a portrait of BenjaminHarrison, grandson of WilliamHenry Harrison.He becamePresident in 1889.If the antecedent consists of a group of words, the relative comes at the end of thegroup, unless this would cause ambiguity.The Superintendent of the Chicago Division, whoA proposal to amend the Sher-man Act, which has been vari-ously judgedA proposal,which has beenvariously judged, to amend theSherman ActA proposal to amend the much-debated Sherman ActThegrandsonofWilliamHenry Harrison, whoWilliamHenryHarrison’sgrandson, Benjamin Harrison,whoA noun in apposition may come between antecedent and relative, because in such acombination no real ambiguity can arise.The Duke of York, his brother, who was regarded withhostility by the WhigsModifiers should come, if possible next to the word they modify. If several expressionsmodify the same word, they should be so arranged that no wrong relation is suggested.
27All the members were notpresent.Not all the members werepresent.He only found two mistakes.He found only two mistakes.Major R. E. Joyce will give alecture on Tuesday evening inBailey Hall, to which the publicis invited, on “My Experiencesin Mesopotamia” at eight P.M.On Tuesday evening at eightP.M.,Major R.E. Joyce willgiveinBaileyHallalec-ture on “My Experiences inMesopotamia.”Thepublicis invited.17. In summaries, keep to one tenseIn summarizing the action of a drama, the writer should always use the present tense.In summarizing a poem, story, or novel, he should preferably use the present, thoughhe may use the past if he prefers. If the summary is in the present tense, antecedentaction should be expressed by the perfect; if in the past, by the past perfect.An unforeseen chance prevents Friar John from deliver-ing Friar Lawrence’s letter to Romeo. Juliet, meanwhile,owing to her father’s arbitrary change of the day set forher wedding, has been compelled to drink the potionon Tuesday night, with the result that Balthasar informsRomeo of her supposed death before Friar Lawrencelearns of the nondelivery of the letter.But whichever tense be used in the summary, a past tense in indirect discourse or inindirect question remains unchanged.The Legate inquires who struck the blow.Apart from the exceptions noted, whichever tense the writer chooses, he should usethroughout. Shifting from one tense to the other gives the appearance of uncertaintyand irresolution (compare Rule 15).

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