from Vision Syndrome that resulted in fatigue dryness blurry vision irritation

From vision syndrome that resulted in fatigue dryness

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from ‘Vision Syndrome’ that resulted in fatigue, dryness, blurry vision, irritation, ocular redness, auditory and tactile illusions” (Gutiérrez et al.). The illusions people would have would involve the sensation of thinking you hear your phone ringing or even vibrating. The researchers acknowledge that there is still much work to be done in this field in light of the limitation of its concepts, criteria, and methodologies. Referring to the results disclosed by the journal, it is very likely that we may refer to our cell phone as an object that is highly addictive and allows for problematic and compulsory use in many situations and contexts. Claudia Dreifus, an American journalist, educator, and producer for the Science Section of The New York Times , also had a lot to say about her understanding of the issue of cell phone addiction. She suggests that we have become so addicted to our phones because we are engineered in such a way that we strive to experience a mental high, where our brains will release dopamine. The dopamine provides us with an amazing feeling that is short-term, which leaves us wanting more. As she mentioned in her article, we used to only refer to addiction whenever it was related to drug use. But nowadays we also use the word to describe the phenomenon of behavioral addictions where, one tech industry leader told her, “people are spending nearly six hours a day tethered to their cell phones” (qtd. in Dreifus). She presented this claim in order to explain how these behavioral addictions are taking a toll on society and more importantly our youth. This addiction is fairly new and progressing into our daily habits in a negative manner. Cell phone addiction has been studied and researched from different age groups but rarely talked about regarding our gender differences. James A. Roberts along with other colleagues wrote a Journal of Holistic Healthcare named “The Invisible Addiction: Cell-Phone Activities and Addiction among Male and Female College Students.” The Journal of Holistic Healthcare, a
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Valencia 5 UK journal focusing on evidence-based practice and the practical implications of research in holistic health and social care, claims that there are some key differences in terms of cell phone addiction when it comes to males and females. In comparing cell phone use by gender, the researchers found that “women reported spending an average of 600 minutes on a cell-phone every day compared to 459 minutes for males" (Roberts et al.). Based on research that was aimed to better understand cell-phone addiction it was concluded that the use of our phones can be “dependency-forming, habitual, and addictive” (Roberts et al.). The research made it very clear that cell-phone addiction does not happen overnight which is just like other forms of behavioral addiction so as a result, the addiction occurs in a process. It has been determined that addiction often initially starts with seemingly harmless behavior that “can become harmful and morph into an addiction” (Roberts et al.). Since women have socially-related motives for using cell-phones
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