Regardless of someones willingness to serve it is

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Regardless of someone's willingness to serve, it is unfair to the individual and to the church to have a few people in the position of controlling various functions and/or committees. No one would want to say publicly that their church has a ruling class within the membership, yet this tendency is widely practiced. This Patron Committeemethod can close channels for a constructive committee process. There are people in every congregation who are either more capable or more willing to serve. The need for broad representative input is far too precious a commodity to sacrifice. The more people that are involved in the process of church administration, the greater the sense of community within the church body. As with the Perpetual Committee, the Patron Committeeleaves little room for the development of new fresh leadership. Is there a simple solution to the dilemma of the Patron Committee? Adopt a church policy that restricts the number of committees church members can serve on. Stick with this policy during enlistment time. Many people will be relieved not to have to serve on numerous committees. Having all committees meeting on the same night would also preclude a person's serving on more than one committee. 3. The Phantom Committee.Another common problem is that many committees just don't meet; if they do meet, they don't accomplish their task. They are selected, elected, and neglected. The Phantom Committeeis visible only at enlistment time and then it vanishes until the next year. Several problems with allowing the developing of committees is that phantom committeesdo not enhance the growth of the individuals enlisted to serve, or the committee's purpose for being. If an elected committee never meets, the nominating committee’s and the members' potential have been wasted. The inactivity of Phantom Committeescan give the impression that the routine of church life is not important. A person serving on one of these Phantom Committeeslikely will begin to think that since the committee doesn't function, the job isn't important, or that his commitment really doesn't mean much either. What can we do to transform these Phantom Committees into highly visible, vibrantly functioning committees? The first action a church should take is to evaluate closely the need for these committees. Do away with unneeded committees. For example, appoint committees only for as long as its purpose for being exists. You don't need a 50th
49 Anniversary Committee if you are in your 54th year! That committee should be dismissed as soon as their business has been finalized. Another solution is to have each committee make a quarterly report to the church. Have each committee develop a worksheet or agenda which they turn in. Ask them to list their goals for the next quarter. Challenge them to make progress toward achieving these goals. The accomplishments of well-functioning committees will inspire others getting in gear instead of disappearing.

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