At this point 2 students should have jawa fever 3 at

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At this Point, 2 Students should have Jawa Fever. 3. At the Signal from your Lab Instructor, slather your Glove again. • At your Lab Instructor’s Signal, shake Hands with the Student who sits behind you at another Bench. Students by the Windows and Students by the Side Bench and Microscope Cabinet get to go on a Field Trip and meet-up and shake Hands at the Back of the Lab. Again, vigorous Interdigitation is Most Helpful to Success. • Return to your Plate, rub your Fingertips across your Palm, and then take your Index Finger and make a Quarter-Sized Smear on Quadrant III. At this Point, 4 Students should have Jawa Fever.
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Lab 7 Page 6 4. At the Signal from your Lab Instructor, goop-up again, slick as a Whistle. • At your Lab Instructor’s Signal, shake Hands with the Student who sits across the Lab Bench from you. This is the last Handshake, so give it your all. • Return to your Plate, rub your Fingertips across your Palm, and then take your Index Finger and make a Quarter-Sized Smear Quadrant IIII. At this point, 8 Students should have Jawa Fever. 5. Tape your Clan’s Nutrient Agar Plates together and label the Tape with your Clan’s Name or a Distinctive Symbol and the Date. • Incubate your Plates at 30°C for 48 Hours. The Clean-Up Gloves go to Oscar. Swabs go in the Stainless Steel Pitcher. Test Tubes go in the Stainless Steel Bus Pan. ___________________________________________________________________________________ I hate the British! You are defeated but you have no shame. You are stubborn but you have no pride. You endure but you have no courage. I hate the British! © 1957 Horizon Pictures
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Lab 7 Page 7 Viable Counts (Atlas Page 217) 1. Look at all of your Plates but check for Plates with between 30 and 300 Colonies. Colonies can overlap and still be counted. If a Plate contains more than 300 Colonies, make a Notation of TNTC (Too Numerous To Count.). Use your Sharpie to mark Plates with a whole lot of Colonies into Quadrants, count the Number of Colonies within one Quadrant, and then multiply this Number by Four. 2. The number of Viable Bacteria per Gram of Hamburger will simply be equal to the Number of Colonies on a Plate divided by the Dilution Factor of that Plate. Example: • There are 150 Colonies on your “7” Nutrient Agar Spread Plate. • Divide 150 by the Dilution Factor: 150 ÷ 10 -7 = 150 x 10 7 = 1.5 x 10 9 • That’s 1.5 x 10 9 Colony Forming Units per Gram of Hamburger Sample 3. Remember -- • Nutrient Agar Spread Plates are used to determine the Total Number of Aerobic Bacteria per Gram of Hamburger. • MacConkey Agar Spread Plates are used to determine the Number of Enteric Bacteria per Gram of Hamburger. Your Viable Count Plates will be seriously Stinky _____________________________________________________ “You mean, you intend to uphold the letter of the law, no matter what it costs?” Without law, Commander, there is no civilization.’ That's just my point; here, there is no civilization.” Then we have the opportunity to introduce it.’ © 1957 Horizon Pictures
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Lab 7 Page 8 Water Quality Testing (MPN) 1. Within each Set of 3 Tubes, determine the Number of Tubes that are Positive (Turbid [“Cloudy”] + Gas). It’s likely that all 3 of your Red Cap Tubes are
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