The family whether adopted or biological take care of

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of communal responsibility. The family, whether adopted or biological, take care of one another. They all work to ensure the larger happiness of the people involved. This is similar to the Adopt- An-Elder program in the Navajo culture where people ensure the comfortability of the senior citizens by donating money and time. It is also similar to Transfer of Power because there is a communal effort to get a job done. The sense of community and kinship is strong in all three of these examples. The Tibetans’ tradition is different from these other cultures because their kinship has a biological basis. The tradition of fraternal polyandry started to maintain and grow the family’s assets. With the Adopt-An-Elder program and the series of support networks as seen in Transfer of Power, their kinship is communal. While they still have strong bonds, and they are still working for the survival of the community as a whole, there are not biological bonds and factors driving the effort. While there may be some biological motivation, that is not the foundation of the kinship. At the end of the day, it does not matter whether the kinship bonds are biological or not. What matters is that everyone is helping one another and there are strong bonds between people for support and livelihood.

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