Cameo portrait of ce ara pacis 13 9 bce commemorative

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Cameo Portrait of Augustus, 41-54 CE
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Ara Pacis, 13-9 BCE
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commemorative architecture and sculpture blend into one another new to Roman society was the idea of commemorating a specific, historical battle rather than allegorizing it—leaders of the time would have had their triumphs painted on panels that were carried in triumphal processions, but none of them has survived this is filled with identifiable portraits rather than ideals, allegories, or gods and goddesses
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Domus Aurea (Golden House of Nero), 64- 68 CE
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Colosseum, 80 CE
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built by Vespasian on the site of Nero’s Golden House—what implications does this have? Colosseum used for gladiatorial conquest and other blood sports gladiators were usually slaves—gained freedom by fighting—some women originally fought, but this was banned in 200 AD games were to keep people occupied and limit problems—paid for by the rich 16 stories high held 50,000 spectators had a wooden floor covered with sand to soak up all the blood warrens of corridors under the floor for moving people and animals built of concrete faced with stone
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