Materials Requirements Planning a planning system that schedules the precise

Materials requirements planning a planning system

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Materials-Requirements Planning: a planning system that schedules the precise quantity of materials needed to make the product. Outsourcing: refers to the contracting of manufacturing or other tasks to independent companies, usually overseas. Routing: the sequence of operations through which the product must pass; sequence depends on the product specifications. Scheduling: the assignment of required tasks to departments or even specific machines, workers or teams. Popular method developed for scheduling : - Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT) - identifies all major activities or events required - arranges them in a sequence or path - determines the critical path - estimates the time required for each event Critical Path: the path requiring the longest time from start to finish; the minimum amount of time needed for completion.
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Quality Control: the processes an organization uses to maintain its established quality standards. Statistical Process Control: a system in which management collects and analyzes information about the production process to pinpoint quality problems in the production system. Total Quality Management: a philosophy that uniform commitment to quality in all areas of an organization will promote a culture that meets customers’ perceptions of quality. - Requires constant improvements in all areas of the company as well as employee empowerment. Benchmarking: the measuring and evaluating of the quality produced by the best-performing companies in the industry; a primary tool of TQM. Inspection: reveals whether a product meets quality standards - Inspecting finished items determines quality level. - Inspecting work-in-process items finds defects before the product is completed so corrections can be made. Sampling: allows a company to pass an entire batch of products through inspection by testing a sample. - There is always the risk of making an incorrect conclusion based on a sample. - Sampling is more likely to be used when inspection tests are destructive to the product. Chpt. 9 : Human Relations: the study of the behavior of individuals and groups in organizational settings. Motivation: an inner drive that directs a person’s behavior toward goals. Morale: an employee’s attitude toward his or her job, employer and colleagues. High Morale Contributes To: - High levels of productivity - High returns to stakeholders - Employee loyalty Low Morale May Cause: - High rates of absenteeism - High rates of employee turnover Intrinsic Rewards: the personal satisfaction and enjoyment that you feel after attaining a goal. Extrinsic Rewards: benefits and/or recognition received from someone else. How to Motivate Employees: - Interact with employees in a friendly and open manner - Equitably dispense rewards and other incentives - Create a culture of collaboration Classic Theory of Motivation: suggests that money is the sole motivator for workers - Fredrick W. Taylor and Frank & Lillian Gilbreth
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- analyzed how workers perform specific work tasks in an effort to improve the employee’s productivity
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  • Spring '14
  • AnkaCorbin
  • Chpt.

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