Fiber optic cabling offers the following advantages

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Fiber optic cabling offers the following advantages and disadvantages: Advantages Disadvantages Completely immune to EMI Highly resistant to eavesdropping Fastest available transmission rates Allows greater cable distances without a repeater Very expensive Difficult to work with Special training required to attach connectors to cables Multi-mode and single mode fiber cables are distinct from each other and not interchangeable. The table below describes multi-mode and single mode fiber cables. Type Description Single Mode Transfers data through the core using a single light ray (the ray is also called a mode ) The core diameter is around 10 microns Supports a large amount of data Cable lengths can extend a great distance Multi-mode Transfers data through the core using multiple light rays The core diameter is around 50 to 100 microns Cable lengths are limited in distance Fiber optic cabling uses the following connector types: Type Description ST Connector Used with single mode and multi-mode cabling Keyed, bayonet-type connector Also called a push in and twist connector Each wire has a separate connector Nickel plated with a ceramic ferrule to ensure proper core alignment and prevent light ray deflection As part of the assembly process, it is necessary to polish the exposed fiber tip to ensure that light is passed on from one cable to the next with no dispersion
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SC Connector Used with single mode and multi-mode cabling Push on, pull off connector type that uses a locking tab to maintain connection Each wire has a separate connector Uses a ceramic ferrule to ensure proper core alignment and prevent light ray deflection As part of the assembly process, it is necessary to polish the exposed fiber tip LC Connector Used with single mode and multi-mode cabling Composed of a plastic connector with a locking tab, similar to an RJ45 connector A single connector with two ends keeps the two cables in place Uses a ceramic ferrule to ensure proper core alignment and prevent light ray deflection Half the size of other fiber optic connectors MT-RJ Connector Used with single mode and multi-mode cabling Composed of a plastic connector with a locking tab Uses metal guide pins to ensure it is properly aligned A single connector with one end holds both cables Uses a ceramic ferrule to ensure proper core alignment and prevent light ray deflection Ethernet 0:00-0:29 Ethernet is the most common local area networking standard for wired networks. Almost every wired network you'll encounter uses the Ethernet standard. In this lesson we're going to look at a typical Ethernet network and the various components that allow communication.
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