The only PRs that matter to me are on the platform or in your arena of

The only prs that matter to me are on the platform or

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every week. The only PRs that matter to me are on the platform or in your arena of athletics. Last I checked, official records aren’t kept on what you do in practice.
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365 STRONG: OWN THE DAY 60 This week is what it’s all about. I do not recommend cutting weight unless you are attempting to set an all-time world record. This is just my opinion, but cutting weight does two things: it causes stress -something that beginners don’t need any more of- and it can crush performance if you don’t replenish yourself correctly. Leave cutting weight for the experienced lifters or those chasing records. Monday I squat, bench, and deadlift up to 30%. I do 3 sets of 8 for each. Then I stretch and do some mobility work. This is important. Wednesday I bench up to 75% x 3 paused singles on my chest. I then stretch and do mobility work. Thursday I do an exact repeat of Monday. After Weigh-Ins I go to a gym (usually in the hotel where the meet is held) and I do a brief full-body workout. 10-15 minutes maximum. It makes me sweat and also makes my body want to absorb food and fluids. I then eat and drink all day long, making sure to never drink to quickly or overeat. Don’t stuff yourself and feel like shit on meet day. This is your chance to showcase your talents. Meet Day I always have a big breakfast (I shoot for four hours before I begin lifting). I eat sandwiches and drink water the entire day of the meet. Bananas, peanut butter, and other healthy treats are great as well. Too much Gatorade can make you sick, so be careful. I pick my attempts like this: my opener is a lift I can easily double and possibly triple. My second is usually just under a PR. My third is an attempt at a new PR. People can argue and say whatever they like about how I plan attempts, but that is it, plain and simple. WEEK 10 (MEET WEEK)
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365 STRONG: OWN THE DAY 61 17 When looking for a practical way to apply this method to various sports, I asked myself, “What is the one factor that can have the most impact for an individual athlete?” It’s strength. There are kids who are born tall, long limbed, fast, who can jump, etc., but one area that can improve multiple facets of an athlete’s ability is strength. So, the adaptation of the method is not that radical. We just make a few adjustments, lighten the weight, up the volume slightly, add in jumps and sprints, and what we wind up with is a program that is universal and can be applied even during the “in-season” due to the recovery-based nature of the program. As a former college track and field athlete (shot put and hammer), we employed jumping and some sprinting into our base of strength work. We also did some throwing, ADAPTATION FOR ATHLETES
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365 STRONG: OWN THE DAY 62 but not in the typical strength and conditioning sense. A lot of coaches, even my good friend and business partner Chad Smith, include throws in their programs. Maybe it was because I was throwing so much with the hammer and shot, but I never saw the benefit from doing more throws in training. If you want to incorporate medicine ball throws, weight throws, or other types of throws, I encourage
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