Him from maximizing northern military advantages and

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him from maximizing Northern military advantages and was thus returned to the field in March 1862. (8) For most of the rest of the year Lincoln had no chief of staff at all. (9) And when he eventually appointed General Harry W. Halleck to the post, he found him an ineffective strategist who left all substantive decision making to the president. (10) Lincoln finally found success with Ulysses S. Grant in March 1864. B. Examine the South’s “defensive” military efforts and the relationship between President Davis and his Southern generals by looking at the following question and answers. 1. How did Davis’ military leadership differ from Lincoln’s? Who did Davis choose as his primary general? How was the relationship between Davis and his chief of staff different from Lincoln’s? (1) Southern command arrangements centered on President Davis, who unlike Lincoln was a trained professional soldier but who, also unlike Lincoln, failed to ever create an effective central command system. (2) Early in 1862, Davis named Robert E. Lee as his principal military advisor. (3) But in fact, Davis had no intention of sharing control of strategy with anyone. (4) After a few months, Lee left Richmond to command forces in the field, and for the next two years Davis planned strategy alone. (5) In February 1864, Davis named General Braxton Bragg as a military advisor, but Bragg
Originally written by Chris Miller Updated by Tony Saavedra 22 never provided much more than technical advice. (6) Not until February 1865 did the Confederate Congress create the formal position of general in chief. (7) Davis named Lee to the post but made clear that he expected to continue to make all basic decisions. (8) In any case, the war ended before the new command structure had time to take shape. 2. What was that nature of both armies at the lower command and infantry level? (1) At lower levels of command, men of markedly similar backgrounds controlled the war in both the North and the South. (2) Many of the professional officers on both sides were graduates of the United States Military Academy at West Point and the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis and thus had been trained in similar ways. (3) Many were closely acquainted, even friendly, with their counterparts on the other side. (4) Amateurs played an important part in both armies as commanders of volunteer regiments. (5) In both the North and South, such men were usually economic or social leaders in their communities who appointed themselves officers and rounded up troops to lead. (6) Although occasionally this system produced officers of real ability, more often it did not. C. Each side acted out the role of sea power in the war differently. Examine this issue by looking at the following questions and answers.

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