I assumed that as on the us mexico border the device

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normal to thermal energy to green night-vision. I assumed that, as on the U.S.-Mexico border, the device retained my picture and added it to a remote database. Another company, called ISPRA, displayed a multi- barreled—crowd-control—weapon called Thunderstorm that could also be mounted to any of the many armored vehicles on display and launch tear gas, stun grenades, and smoke, either separately or at the same time. Preparing, I assumed, like many in surrounding booths, for the inevitable resistance of the displaced to Koleskinova’s “three Gs.” And as Koleskinova spoke, when someone opened the door, the noise of this bustling marketplace was so deafening that I had to strain to hear her. I have been to many homeland security trade expos over the years, but never have I been to one with such energy, so much raw excitement. As global warming accelerates, there is a fortune to be made. “WHICH OTHER MEANS DO YOU HAVE TO SOLVE YOUR BORDER ISSUES?” British Rear Admiral Chris Parry summed up the international security consensus regarding climate refugees in perhaps the most vivid terms. The future climate migrations would be like the “Goths and the Vandals,” 1 the barbarian invaders who brought down the Roman Empire in the 5th century. Large immigrant populations, he said, would have little regard for their host countries and begin a sort of “reverse colonisation,” 2 a term similar to the reconquista used by members of border militia groups in the United States who fear that Mexico will take its territory back (the United States took over nearly half of Mexico after the Mexican-American war in the mid 19th century). Because of this, Parry laid out a prescient prediction (now backed by the dystopic 74
Milipol floor): the increasing shift to robots, drones, nanotechnology, lasers, microwave weapons, space-based systems, and “customized” nuclear bombs. 3 These are the guards, gates, and guns necessary to protect the centers of political, economic, and social power that will really be under attack by the coming climate-induced “barbarian” hordes. In her book A Paradise Built in Hell , Rebecca Solnit examined militarized responses to natural disasters, ranging from the 1906 earthquake in San Francisco to Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans in 2005. Following an essay in Social Forces by Lee Clarke and Caron Chess in 2008, Solnit and many other scholars called these sorts of heavy-handed responses “elite panic.” 4 Solnit wrote, “Elites and authorities often fear the changes of disaster or anticipate that change means chaos and destruction or at least the undermining of the foundations of their power.” 5 The findings that Solnit’s work underscored would not be popular or profitable for the vendors on the Milipol floor: disaster sociologists’ studies demonstrate not only that panic in the face of disaster “is rare,” but that people in such situations are more inclined to engage in acts of mutual assistance, community solidarity, and altruism.

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