Nelson d l quick j c 2017 orgb5 organizational

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Nelson, D. L. & Quick, J. C. (2017). ORGB5: Organizational behavior (5th Edition). Boston, MA: Cengage.
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What aspects of one's existence and environment shape attitudes? There are two factors that influence one’s attitude. According to Nelson and Quick (2017), “the first influence is direct experience and the other is social learning” (p. 54). Direct experience can relate to something you have done yourself, such as not like a class or playing a sport, you attribute your bad experience to shape your attitude of it in the future. From a social learning perspective, according to Nelson and Quick (2017), “this is the family, peer groups, religious organizations, and culture that shape an individual’s attitude indirectly” (p. 54). There are many examples of social learning with what religion you are brought up with, political preference and even work ethic that is instilled in you at a young age. Cultural differences can definitely shape attitude as well, one example is the difference with the emphasis on family and vacation time between the U.S and European countries. While the U.S. generally gives out ten days of vacation, normal vacation time in Europe could be upwards of 30 days. The U.S. is also expected to go to work directly after graduating from college, whereas, in Europe most college graduates take six months to a year off to travel the world or go backpacking for cultural exposure. There are different factors when it comes to workplace environment and attitude, when an employee is consistently negative in the workplace it can shift attitude thinking and disengages other employees. “Attitudes at work are important because, directly or indirectly, they affect work behavior” (Nelson and Quick, 2017, p. 55). Nelson, D. L. & Quick, J. C. (2017). ORGB5: Organizational behavior (5th Edition). Boston, MA: Cengage.
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Describe some of the characteristics of high achievers. “The need for achievement encompasses excellence, competition, challenging goals, persistence, and overcoming difficulties” (Nelson and Quick, 2017, p. 74). Some of the characteristics that define high achievers are, “they set goals that are moderately difficult yet achievable, they like to receive feedback on their progress towards those goals, and they do not like having eternal events or other people interfere with their progress towards those goals” (Nelson and Quick, 2017, p. 74-75). The theory states that people with the need for achievement usually perform better than those who do not. The reasoning behind this is that high achievers “often hope and plan for success, may be quite content to work alone or with other people who are goal oriented, and like being very good at what they do” (Nelson and Quick, 2017, p. 75). Cultural differences can play a huge role in the need for achievement and how it is reflected, where in the U.S. is probably has the highest achievement tendency it may be low in group cultures, such as Japan or China.
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  • Spring '10
  • DR.NEPTUNE
  • The Bible, Organizational studies

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