Kennedy mostly looked at the audience rather than relying his notes to ensure a

Kennedy mostly looked at the audience rather than

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Kennedy mostly looked at the audience rather than relying his notes to ensure a deeper connection with the audience. The composition of the speech was made so that no one would feel stereotyped by repeatedly using the word “we” rather than singling out a group or specific culture, showing respect for the cultural diversity of his audience. While there were mostly African American residents in the crowd, he knew that this they may not want to hear the news from a white man, he felt as though it was worth the risk. Kennedy used effective persuasion to convince the crowd that fighting against one another is not the answer; rather the solution was joining together to fight against racism and injustice and continuing the work of their famed Civil Rights leader.
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"Another factor contributing to the overall effectiveness of the speech was Kennedy's “pathos” or “identification” with the black community itself.” (Anatol & Bittner, p.33) He created a new image of himself to the black community by showing his dismay of the assassination.
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