Many of the people that occupy the icu are only there

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Many of the people that occupy the ICU are only there for monitoring and do not need the ICU resources and many have less than a 2% mortality risk. It was also studied that more than half of ICU (53.6) had four or more beds available more than half the time (Ward and Chong, 2015). According to these numbers expanding the ICU at United General might indeed be wasteful. It appears as though ICUs are increasingly providing care to patients who are likely at the end of their lives or have acute illness that does not require care by an intensivist. Both groups, could possibly be cared for by other patient units at a lower cost (Ward and Chong, 2015).
Current Vs. Future State
ICU Monitoring Impact Staffing: An excess of ICU beds requires additional staffing of nurses and physicians. Subscribing to an ICU monitoring model would reduce the strain on nursing and physician staff by having hourly virtual rounds. Having a 10 to one ratio also alleviates the workload for the bedside staff. Becky Walters indicated there was increased collaboration using the ICU monitoring solution. This will help increase efficiency of the staff as well as increase their knowledge. Productivity: Implementing the use of ICU monitoring as stated by Becky Walters has the opportunity to increase the number of patients under care. Using ICU monitoring reduces the number of errors. With 96% of patients and 80% of staff from an outside hospital stating that care quality is increased with the help of ICU monitoring show its effect on productivity.
ICU Monitoring Impact Competitiveness: ICU monitoring boost competitiveness because it provides 24/7 monitoring, the scope, reach, and availability of an intensivist specialty expertise Groves, Holcomb, and Smith, 2008). This on demand type of care is ideal for patient quality thus making United General a sought after place of care. The traditional physician, nurse, and patient relationship is substantially augmented when there is an ICU physician immediately available to address issues in patient care, particularly at night when physicians are less likely to be present at the bedside and with decreased mortality rate and improved outcomes United General will be a top competitor (Groves et al., 2008). Finance: ICU monitoring has been attributed to a 30% reduction in length of stay which has attributed to savings over $4,000. With a reduction in length of stay means more patients can be seen. This creates an increase in hospital revenue.
Summarized Evidence The evidence used for recommendation was based on the finances the organization can save with ICU monitoring. ICU monitoring can save on average around $4, 000 per month per patient. In addition not expanding the ICU can save money for the organization as well. As stated leaders are quick too jump the gun and automatically want to expand the ICU because of the capacity. The evidence suggest that this is not always the case and leaders should look at additional options such as alternative levels of care.
Why Evidence Matters

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