are guilty of such horrid crimes choose darkness rather the light Thus we see

Are guilty of such horrid crimes choose darkness

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are guilty of such horrid crimes, choose darkness rather the light....Thus we see that if the body found in the river was that of Marie Rogêt,it could only have been in the water two and a half days, or three atthe outside. All experience has shown that drowned bodies, or bodiesthrown into the water immediately after death by violence, require fromsix to ten days for decomposition to take place to bring them to the topof the water. Even where a cannon is fired over a corpse, and it risesbefore at least five or six days’ immersion, it sinks again, if letalone. Now, we ask, what was there in this cave to cause a departurefrom the ordinary course of nature?... If the body had been kept in itsmangled state on shore until Tuesday night, some trace would be found onshore of the murderers. It is a doubtful point, also, whether the bodywould be so soon afloat, even were it thrown in after having beendead two days. And, furthermore, it is exceedingly improbable that anyvillains who had committed such a murder as is here supposed, wouldhave thrown the body in without weight to sink it, when such a precautioncould have so easily been taken.”The editor here proceeds to argue that the body must have been in thewater “not three days merely, but, at least, five times three days,”because it was so far decomposed that Beauvais had great difficultyin recognizing it. This latter point, however, was fully disproved. Icontinue the translation:“What, then, are the facts on which M. Beauvais says that he has nodoubt the body was that of Marie Rogêt? He ripped up the gown sleeve,and says he found marks which satisfied him of the identity. The publicgenerally supposed those marks to have consisted of some description
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of scars. He rubbed the arm and found hair upon it--something asindefinite, we think, as can readily be imagined--as little conclusiveas finding an arm in the sleeve. M. Beauvais did not return that night,but sent word to Madame Rogêt, at seven o’clock, on Wednesday evening,that an investigation was still in progress respecting her daughter. Ifwe allow that Madame Rogêt, from her age and grief, could not go over,(which is allowing a great deal,) there certainly must have been someone who would have thought it worth while to go over and attend theinvestigation, if they thought the body was that of Marie. Nobody wentover. There was nothing said or heard about the matter in the Rue PavéeSt. Andrée, that reached even the occupants of the same building. M. St.Eustache, the lover and intended husband of Marie, who boarded in hermother’s house, deposes that he did not hear of the discovery of thebody of his intended until the next morning, when M. Beauvais cameinto his chamber and told him of it. For an item of news like this, itstrikes us it was very coolly received.”In this way the journal endeavored to create the impression of an apathyon the part of the relatives of Marie, inconsistent with the suppositionthat these relatives believed the corpse to be hers. Its insinuations
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