U take out your notebook and consider what you can do

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u Take out your notebook and consider what  you can do to produce less waste u Write down three things you can do to  produce less trash
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Reducing Solid Waste u Source   reduction:  any change in the  design, manufacture, purchase, or use of  materials or products to reduce their  toxicity prior to disposal.  u Source reduction also includes the reuse  of products or materials. u Think PRECYCLE!
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Recycling u Recycling:  the process of recovering valuable or useful  materials from waste or scrap – OR reusing items. u Huge savings - 95% less energy is needed to produce  aluminum from recycled aluminum than from ore. u About 70% less energy is needed to make paper from  recycled paper than from trees.
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Composting u Compost:  a mixture of decomposing organic matter,  such as manure and rotting plants, that is  used as fertilizer and soil conditioner.   
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Composting u Yard waste often makes up more than 15% of a  community s solid waste. u Food waste makes up 11% of a community solid waste u Waste sent to a landfill can be reduced 26% if  we all composted!
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Different ways to compost    
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Changing what we use u Changing the materials we use could eliminate  much of the solid waste we produce. u Recycling other common household products  into new, useable products could also help  eliminate solid waste. u For example, plastic beverage containers can be  recycled to make nonfood containers, insulation,  carpet yarn, textiles, fiberfill, and more.
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