3 In David Thoreaus essay an abundant amount of various types of metaphors and

3 in david thoreaus essay an abundant amount of

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3. In David Thoreau's essay, an abundant amount of various types of metaphors and similes can be found throughout his essay. Mr. Thoreau's use of extensive metaphors strengthens David Thoreau’s point of view. For example, when Thoreau explains, “the mass of men serve the state thus, not as men mainly, but as machines, with their bodies”. In this metaphor, Thoreau is comparing men to machines, working with and only with their bodies. The state does not see the men who serve its government as pure, honest individuals, but instead as machines, with only one job to do, with no compassion at all. Another example of a metaphor used by David Thoreau is when he states, “ ...whatever of the judgment or of the moral sense; but they put themselves on a level with wood and earth and stones; and wooden men can perhaps be manufactured that will serve the purpose as well.” This is another metaphor that is backing up how the government uses its soldiers, or population, only to do the dirty work for itself. That men can be made into
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wood, which resembles as tools; as well as stone, and earth. I believe that David Thoreau wanted the readers of his “Civil Disobedience” to not make an outright decision, but instead to think about their own government and think if they agree and should support those who are running their country. Thoreau wanted his readers to feel confused, and in thought as to if the government really is on the side of the people or if the government is just using its people to do their dirty work. This is evident due to no real outright fight against government, instead put with facts and questions that make the reader wonder what is really right and how a citizen should act upon their own government. Thoreau’s purpose in his essay is to get people to go against a government that isn’t fully for the people, but instead for their own selfish ways. As he says, “I please myself with imagines a State at respect as an neighbor; which even would not think it inconsistent with its own by it, who fulfilled all the duties of neighbors and fellow-men. A State which bore this kind of fruit, and suffered it to drop off as fast as it ripened, would prepare the way for a still more perfect and glorious State, which also I have imagined, but not yet anywhere seen.” In this statement, Thoreau explains himself in which he wishes for a state that respects its people and wishes the best for them, but he has not yet encountered a state like that. His purpose in “Civil Disobedience” is to persuade people to look and work for a government that will support the choice and decision of people rather than the government elite. Question 2: Civil Disobedience
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1. The section that lets the reader know the subject and composition in ‘Civil Disobedience’ begins on page 210 and really stops mainly on page 214. In this section, an answer can be found on the subject that is being written about.
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