11 World War I accelerated the migration of African Americans to northern

11 world war i accelerated the migration of african

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11. World War I accelerated the migration of African Americans to northern cities. This immigration began after the Civil War. 12. Between 1910 and 1940s, almost 2 million African Americans left the South. Although they were usually able to improve their economic situation, they still faced discrimination, segregation, and sometimes even race riots. 13. After World War I, disillusioned Americans wanted to return to the traditional foreign policy of isolationism. 14. The end of World War I was followed by a recession caused by the shift from wartime to a peacetime economy. Production, farm income, and exports fell. Unemployment rose, reaching 12 percent in 1921. For farmers, in particular, hardship continued throughout the decade. 15. The 1920s were a time of mass consumption-huge quantities of manufactured goods were available, and many people had more money to spend on them. 16. The transformation of American society in the 1920s. Led by Henry Ford and the automobile industry, mass production and the moving assembly line resulted in uniform products produced at lower costs. It made possible a consumer-oriented economy, one in which more goods were available to more Americans. Often these goods were purchased over time through installment buying. 17. During the 1920s, American society experienced a struggle with social change as it became an urban, industrial nation. Changes in lifestyle, values, morals, and manners increased tension and conflict. Wealth, possessions, having fun, and sexual freedom -ideas influenced by the psychology of Sigmund Freud - were the new values.
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18. The overall prosperity of the United States in the 1920s overshadowed the chronic poverty of certain vulnerable populations. These were the same populations that had always been at risk in American history: children, older Americans, minorities, female-headed families, people with disabilities, and workers with unstable or low-paying jobs. 19. The “new poverty” began with the famous stock market crash of 1929 and the onset of the Great Depression . This is when many middle and upper-income families first experienced poverty in America. These were hard-working people who fully shared the values and ideals of the American dream, people who had enjoyed the strong economy of the 1920s and had bought the homes, refrigerators, and automobiles. The sudden and severe downturn of the American economy left many of these people in shock and denial. Some became suicidal. 20. the New Deal created a major federal health and human service system in addition to the services of local public and private agencies. 21. Following World War II, the United States began an economic boom that brought unparalleled prosperity to a majority of its citizens and raised Americans expectations, breeding a belief that most economic and social problems could be solved. 22. Among the crucial themes of this period were the struggle for equality among women and minorities, and the backlash that these struggles evoked; the growth of the suburbs, and the shift in power from the older industrial states and cities of the Northeast and upper Midwest to the South and West; and the belief that the U.S. had the economic and military power to
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