Supported vs supporting within the usg military and

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Supported vs. Supporting- Within the USG, military and civilian agencies perform supported and supporting roles in both foreign and domestic operations. There is no equivalent command relationship between military forces and civilian agencies and organizations and no formal supported/supporting relationships created by an establishing authority. Clearly defined roles and relationships: Foster harmony Reduce friction The usage of "supported" and "supporting" relationships is often a framework for perspective in the relationships between military and civilian agencies.
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Embrace Unified Action and Unity of Effort- Commanders are the most effective in achieving this unified action when they use an inclusive approach by working hand in hand with agency, multinational, and other external partners. These commanders understand the different perspectives and cultures among both our agency and other external partners, and focus on gaining unity of effort. They avoid taking an authoritative lead role in this coordination realizing the value of different perspectives and capabilities, and that a military-led approach may be counterproductive to effective relationships, impede overall unity of effort, and compromise mission accomplishment. Click each button for more information. Unified Action-unified direction. Unified Efforts-common objective Cause of Friction- Friction can occur at the operational and theater strategic level with respect to unified action and interagency coordination in any operation. This friction is tied to different authorities, cultures, and focus areas relevant to the various USG departments. Degree of Cooperation -Military policies, processes, and procedures are very different from those of civilian organizations. Cooperation between IGOs, NGOs, and the private sector is normally based on a mutual interest, and can occur informally for a specific period of time. While many of these organizations normally resist entering into enduring formalized agreements, there are some voluntary associations or collaborations among such organizations that can provide the joint force commander with useful venues to gain situational awareness and share information. Examples are Relief Web and Business Executives for National Security.
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Necessity of Cooperation- Additionally, there are challenges associated with unified action and interagency coordination. Our agency partners normally do not have the budget, the number of personnel, nor the capacity to conduct certain types of operations as does the military. In both foreign and domestic operations, DoD is normally called on to provide support where agency resources are insufficient. Lead agency responsibilities during both foreign and domestic operations are established by law and by policy within the Executive Branch. Lead agency status is not determined by size or capability. During Operation UNIFIED RESPONSE the number of JTF headquarters personnel on the scene, as well as equipment and resources, significantly exceeded that of USAID-OFDA. However, that agency led the U.S. effort, in support of the U.S.
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  • Fall '18
  • Commander, task force, Unified Combatant Command, LNOs

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