Diphthongs A diphthong is a compound of two sounds The two vowel diphthongal

Diphthongs a diphthong is a compound of two sounds

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Diphthongs
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A diphthong is a compound of two sounds. The two vowel diphthongal sounds are oi or oy, pronounced as (a-e), and ou or ow pronounced as (a-oo). The letter y is classed as a vowel when it is part of the diphthong oy; the letter w is classed as a vowel when it is part of the diphthong ow. The diphthongs have no distinguishing diacritics. Syllabication. Syllabication, as the name implies, is the method of dividing words into the proper syllables for pronunciation. In the primary grades, the young people of today are taught to recog- nize certain phonograms or phonic units; for example, ed, en, an, ot, ig, un, which serve as key sounds to the pronunciation of words. The children thus learn to pronounce easily at sight words that are unfamiliar. RULES OF SYLLABICATION Make use of the following rules: 1. A syllable, wherever possible, should be opened with a con- sonant, and closed with a vowel, as : beau ti ful; pho tog- raph y.
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2. Two consonants occurring together are separated, as: il his traie; plat form. However, this rule does not apply to digraphs, such as ch, gh, ph, th, which are pronounced as single sounds. 3. Two vowels occurring together are separated, as: idea, sci ence. However, this rule does not apply to diphthongs, such as o/, oy, ou, ow, which are pronounced as single sounds. 4. A consonant between two vowels goes with the later syllable, as : ex pe di ent, ve he merit. (Practically same rule as Rule 1.) 5. An initial vowel forms a syllable by itself, as : a midst; i ci cle. However, this rule does not apply when the vowel forms the initial letter of a one-syllable prefix.
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CHAPTER, V RELATION OF SPEAKER AND AUDIENCE He spoke, and in the measured cadence of his quiet voice there was intense feeling, but no declamation, no passionate appeal, no superficial and feigned emotion. It was simple colloquy — a gentleman conversing, (about Wendell Phillips). — George W. Curtis Approaching the audience. As you enter upon the platform, the central theme of your speech should be uppermost in your mind. Your whole attitude and expression should indicate that you are intensely interested in what you have to say, — that you have something to share and that you are glad to share it. The manner in which you walk forward should be frank and unaffected. Do not walk across the stage in a straight line, and then make a military turn before advancing. Do not mince for- ward in an apologetic manner. The audience likes the straight- forward manner of a positive speaker, and you will immediately gain their confidence as well as interest, if, instead of shrinking to
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one side of the stage, you take the center of the platform and look directly at your hearers. Greet the audience with perfect poise. Let them feel a warm cordiality in your manner. What is more, — your kindly feeling will do much toward overcoming any tendency towards self-con- sciousness or stage fright. It is well, before beginning to talk or read, to include the audience in a welcoming glance. If you look quickly and easily first at those in the center of the room, then at those to one side, and then to the other side, and then back to the
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