Canterbury Tales 9 Flashcards

Terms Definitions
plenteous
plentiful
sundry
various
Caprices
whims
benign
good-natured
Friar
Hubert
superfluity
excess
trewe
true
wimple
a headcloth
temperament
usual mood
engender
beget, procreate
zest
keen relish
Franklin
Wealthy landowner
calumny
false, malicious
hallow
honor as holy
wife of bath
urbanite
ribaldry
behavior, ribald humor
Summoners
Black scabby brows
Expound
to set forth
emulate
to immatate (verb)
breathed
uttered without voice
carouses
drinks and celebrates noisily
Prioress
-spoke French
-fastidious
-attempts to give impression of a courtly woman
-kind to animals
-wide forehead=intelligent
-wore jewelry
-light satire: too focused on temporal things for a nun
glib
artfully persuasive in speech
agile
moving quickly and lightly
illiterate, street-smart, debt-free, steals, dishonest
Manciple
Garner
assemble or get together
contentious
perversely fond of argument
decorum
appropriateness of behavior or conduct
Pestilence
infectious or contagious epidemic disease that spreads rapidly
Geoffrey Chaucer
Who wrote Canterbury Tales?
page-errand boy
What was Chaucers job
william caxten invented
movable type press
rancor
bitter, long-lasting resentment; deep seated ill will
blasphemy
contemptuous utterance or action concerning God or sacred things
absolution
the act of absolving or remitting
sedate
calm, quiet, or composed; undisturbed by passion or excitement.
Tabard
the inn from which they start
choleric
too much yellow bile. bad tempered
Manciple
Illiterate fellow can outpace the wisdom of a heap of learned men
nun
worldly matters, love overcomes all things, worldly matters, inferior French
Cook
could distinguish London ale by flavor; was great at making food.
magnanimity
liberality in bestowing gifts; liberal and generous of spirit
Motley
variegated in color; composed of diverse often incongruous elements
Doctor
had a special love of gold
Parson
would "rebuke" someone who was sinning, regardless of their position
feed her dogs fine food
the nun
secular
relating to worldly things, not bound by monastic vows or rules
dink
either partner of a married couple having two incomes and no children.
avouch
to declare as a matter of fact
threadbare
clothing that is worn out; or indicating someone is very poor
Theseus
the king of Athens who imprisons Arcite and Palemon
contrite
grieving and penitent for sin or shortcoming
Skipper
The nicer rules of conscience he ignored
beauty and clothes
heroes/heroines were portrayed as having magnificent _____
Prioress (Nun)
Physical: nasal voice, speaks French, sweet smile, gray eyes, small red mouth, broad forehead, heavier, coral beads, with green jade and gold broach Character: very mannered, pleasant, friendly, very compassionate towards dogs, fake concerned about her appearance, not spiritual at all Aristocrat
Summoner
loved to eat garlic, onions, and leeks
Monk
A monk given to corporeal pleasures. Most monks of the Middle Ages lived in monasteries according to the Rule of Saint Benedict, which demanded that they devote their lives to "work and prayer." This Monk cares little for the Rule; his devotion is to hunting and eating. He is large, loud, and well clad in hunting boots and furs.
burgess
a person with municipal authority or privileges, former member of parliament
agility
the quality or state of being agile; nimbleness, dexterity
burnished
polished by friction or made smooth & bright
reeve
an administrative officer of a town or district
Alison
As any weasel was her body graceful and slender (Miller's Tale)
arbitrate
act between parties with a view to reconciling differences
oxford cleric
hollow looking; only wanted to study; spent all his money on books; no position in church; threadbare coat
Harry Bailey the host
Physical description: large man, bright large eyes
Personality: invites himself to come along, crafty, would give the pilgrims a free meal, becomes a pilgrim
Chaucer's opinion:
Yeoman
Def: in former times was free and cultivated his own land
Etymology: Middle English yoman, yeman
Own words: a farmer
Usury
the act of lending money at an exorbitant rate of interest
Wore a necklace that said "love conquers all".
The Nun
coffer
a box used to hoold money or other valuables
He was of sovereign value in all eyes/ and through so much distinguished he was wise
knight
literary confession
pardoner & w.o.b. tale ; first person narrative in whihc a character explain his/her character and motivation
Indirect Characterization
we have to exercise our own judgement, putting clues together to figure out what a character is like- just as we do in real life when we are getting to know someone
household free to all the county with best bread and wine
the franklin
Discreet he was, a man to reverence/ Or so he seemed, his sayings were so wise
Sergeant at Law
Canterbury Cathedral to worship Thomas Becket
The destination of the Pilgrims
describe the cook
he is gross and dirty, and shouldnt be in the kitchen., but he is the best cook around with and open sore
According to this qoute from the Host, which type of story will win the contest?
"And then the man whose story is best told/That is to say who gives the fullest measure/Of good morality and pleasure."
Stories with morals that everone likes.
Hostelry
inn
guile
duplicity
...
Doctor
abate
subside
defective
faulty
devoutly
devoted
agast
afraid
cavalcade
procession; parade
beseech
to beg
trifling
minor; insignificant
Consultation
A Conference
Diligent
Hardworking, assiduous
thrice
three times
florins
gold coins
list(e)
it pleases
lascivious
inclined to lustfullness
palmers
any religious pilgrim
tempest
A violent storm
excommunicate
subject to excommunication
how many stories?
24
rebuke
to criticize sharply
fake lisp
the friar
avouches
declares as a fact
blissful
completely happy and contented
beguile
captivate, enthrall, to influence
Miller
Weight compared to stone
Plowman
brother of the parson
tithe
payments for the Church
virtuous
having excellent morals, righteous
mirth
amusement, esp. expressed as laughter
taffeta
a crisp smooth lustrous fabric
ashen
ash colored, or extremely pale
clamorous
vigorous in demands or complaints
Fabliaux
A short Bawdy humorous tale
draught
preliminary or first before final
wore a stained tunic
the knight
frugal
(adj.) economical, avoiding waste and luxury; scanty, poor, meager
how many people went on pilgrimage?
29
steward
someone who manages another's property or finances
supple
bending and moving easily and gracefully
perturb
to throw into great disorder
to derange
to addle
Veronica
image of the face of Chirst
haberdasher
salesman of small wares, especially men's clothing or furnishings such as hats, gloves, shirts ties, and socks
Diligently
constant in effort to accomplish something
prating
chatter, to talk excessively and pointlessly; babble
Hauberk
part of knight's clothing, knee-length tunic made up of iron rings that offered protection against spears and swords
The Monk
abandoned the simple life; rebelled against the rules of his order; hunted and was active; hefty because he didn't fast; wore a love pin instead of rosary beads
disdain
n. scorn; feeling or display of contempt; aloofness
Pardoner
A seller of religious artifacts who boasts of his cons
ecclesiastic
a clergyman or other person in religious orders
Superfluous
more than is needed, desired, or required
extort
to wrest or wring something by intimidation threats or force from an unwilling resisting person
to extract
For being unmannerly
What does Chaucer apologize for?
indecorum
lack of propriety or good taste (noun)
the monks jewelery
a wrought-gold cunningly fashioned pin; Into a lover's knot it seemed to pass
Chivalry
The code of behaviour for knights, which stressed truth, honor, generosity, and courtesy.
Dyer
dyes fabric and leather; guildsman "of one impressive guild-fraternity" (middle class)
host
the host is a warm welcoming admirable man
shipman
"he sent his captives home to every land by water. But when it comes to his craft and reckoning the tides...... his anchorage and his moon and his compass work""he knew all the havens as they appear from Gotland to the cape of Finisterre, and every creek in Brittany and Spain..." expert navegator, makes people walm the plank, doesn't spend a lot of time on land, somewhat pirate
Second Nun
Not described in the General Prologue, but she tells a saint's life for her tale
The Manciple
from the inner temple, buys victuals, watched the market, illiterate, more than 30 masters, trades and professions
Many a draft of vintage red and yellow,/ He'd drawn at Bordeaux while the trader snored
Skipper
The Nun
described as modest and quiet, she aspires to have exquisite taste. Her table manners are dainty, she knows French (though not the French of the court), she dresses well, and she is charitable and compassionate towards animals.
Prince Lionel's wife most likely did what for Chaucer?
educated him
Peasant
poor farmer or laborer of low social rank; course, uneducated person
The Plowman
Honest worker, kind of low class, Parson's brother, loved God and neighbor, country farmer, wore short jacket
under a tree
Where the old man said death was
buckler
a small round shield held or worn on the arm
The Knight's Tale
a chivalrous tale of how "love conquers all"
satire/ irony of prioress
the nun had a love charm
licentiate
one who is granted a license by an authorized body to practice a specified profession (noun)
the yeoman
rode with the squire and the knight, was a "proper forester" knew woodwork
Nun (Prioress)
One of the head nuns who was supposed to follow standards of church
In appearance is nice simple and charitable, but in reality is a fake poser, who tried to be royal
cares for animals, but doesn't help the poor hungry people
not the typical nun, she didn't live in a nunnery, was more social
she wore a lot of jewelry, had trinkets
she had an elegant nose, small mouth, a really large forehead, but other than that is pretty
Chaucer thinks she's materialistic, and has fake kindness but really likes material items
"Her greatest oath was only 'By St. Loy!'" (patron saint of goldsmiths/courtiers) 'Pleasant and friendly in her ways, and straining/To counterfeit a courtly kind of grace
Chaucer wrote the Miller's tale when
he got out of prison
The 2-way each way plan
What plan do the pilgrims agree to?
which classes of society does the narrator critisize?
the upperclass because they are corrupt and just want money and power. faovrs lowerclass
what can you inferr about the status of tradesmen from chaucers description
have lots of money, think they should have political status, snobby, think they are the shit, wives agreed. they basically wanted wealth and power
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