English Poetry Vocab 3 Flashcards

Terms Definitions
hackneyed
commonplace
Cross
Langston Hughes
pentameter
five feet
Emily Dickinson
Poet
Inebriate
to make drunk
diction
poet's word choice
Living Like Weasels
Annie Dillard
connotation
associated and suggested meaning
allusion
reference to another thing
feet
the smallest part of meter
Sonnet
fourteen-line lyric poem, usually written in rhymed iambric pentameter.
foot
the basic unit of meter
HYPERBOLE
Figurative language. An exaggeration for emphasis or humorous effect
Figurative Language
language that communicates ideas beyond the ordinary or literal meaning of words. it is a way of using words so that they mean something other than what they seem to say. a poet uses original, creative figures of speech to make powerful use of language, to enrich and extend meaning. for example, a metaphor, simile, or symbol.
meter
pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables established in line of poetry
Personification
Giving human traits to nonhuman things
defilement
to make foul, dirty, or unclean
Anapestic
Two unstressed followed by one stressed syllable
ode
poem that celebrates something or someone
Speaker
Voice that talks to the reader
Author clearly states a character's traits
Direct characterization
Shakespearean sonnet
A poem in the 17th Century
Consonance
is the repetition of consonant sounds. Although it is similar to alliteration, consonance is not limited to the first letter of words.
epic poem
a poem dealing with heroic action
enjambment
the continuation of a complete idea from one line to the next
Extended metaphor
A comparison that develops throughout an entire poem
horizon
line where the earth and sky meet
Eliot
high modernist
-the love song of j. alfred prufrock
limerick
5-line poem riming aabba, mostly in anapestic feet
Dialect
A type of informational diction. They are spoken by definable groups of people from a particular geographic region, economic group, or social class.
An expression that combines contradictory or opposite ideas.
Figures of Speech:
Volta
The jump or change in direction or thought or emotion of a poem. Happens in the couplets.
Caesura
a break or pause (usually for sense) in the middle of a verse line
onomatopoeia
when a word sounds like what it is
Simile
A common figure of speech that makes an explicit comparison between two things by using words such as like, as, than, appears, and seems:
repitition
the use, more than once, of any element of language - a sound, a word, a phrase, a clause, a sentence, or a rhythmical or grammatical pattern
elegy
a poem of lament, meditating on the death of an individual
Metaphor
Comparison where we say that one thing is something else
Idioms
A phrase or expression that has a different meaning from what the words suggest in their original meaning
Accent
Refers to the stressed portion of a word. An accent is used to place emphasis on a word.
Lune
a 3 line poem with the syllable count that adds to 13, for the 12 moons in the sky a year
syncope
the omission of a sound in the middle of a word
oxymoron
a form of paradox that combines a pair of contrary terms into a single expression
Langston Hughes
1900's. USA. Jazz and blues. The Weary Blues.
onomatopoeia 
the use of a word whose sound suggests it's meaning
Figure of speech/figurative language
a word or phrase that describes something in a way that is not literally true, but may be true in a deeper sense. Metaphor, personification, and simile are specific types of figurative language.
dead metaphor
a metaphor that has been used so often that we don't even realize its a metaphor
blank verse
: A line of poetry or prose in unrhymed iambic pentameter. Shakespeare's sonnets, Milton's epic poem Paradise Lost, and Robert Frost's meditative poems such as "Birches" include many lines of blank verse. Here are the opening blank verse lines of "Birches": When I see birches bend to left and right / Across the lines of straighter darker trees, / I like to think some boy's been swinging them.
Name some attributes of William Carlos Williams' This is Just to Say.
- real life: a note stuck to a fridge- appeals to taste & touch- domestic scene- who: you & I (couple)- giving in to temptation- apologizing (sense of something wrong)
6 feet
hexameter
Pyrrhic
Unstressed, unstressed foot
assonance
repetition of vowel sounds
Dactylic
Stressed, unstressed, unstressed foot
cacophony
sounds that are deliberately unpleasant
exposition
a systematic interpretation or explanation (usually written) of a specific topic
setting
the surroundings of environment of anything
rhyme
repetition of identical and concluding syllables at the end of lines
alliteration
the repetition of consonant sounds, particularly at the beginning of words
free verse
poetry without rhyme or meter
Syntax
the grammatical arrangement of words in sentences
Symbolism
Anything that stands for or represents something else. These are common in everyday life.
epic
a long narrative poem about the exploits of a hero
repetition
a repeating of words usually close together
iamb
A metrical foot consisting of an unaccented syllable followed by an accented one
Metonymy
a figure of speech where a closely related term is replaced for an idea
elizabethan/shakespearean sonnet
3 quatrains(4 lines) and 1 rhyming couplet(2 lines)
rhyme scheme: abab, cdcd, efef,gg
usually a question or theme is set forth in the quatrains and an answer or resolution appears in the couplet
Inversion
the reversal of word order that makes a rhyme work
Haiku -
Haiku is a poetic form from the Japanese culture. Many themes include nature, feelings, or experiences.. The form for Haiku is three short lines. The first line contains five (5) syllables, the second line seven (7) syllables, and the third line contains five (5) syllables.
narrative poetry
poetry that tells a story. it is longer and objective (does not reveal feelings of speaker)
Literal language
a form of language where what is written is what is meant
Internal rhyme
a rhyme created by two or more words in the same line of verse.
Dulce et Decorum Est
"Gas! GAS! Quick, boys! - An ecstasy of fumbling"
hexameter
six ft.
Tetrameter
four feet
Anonymous
"Sir Patrick Spens"
conflict
a fight battle or struggle
Paradox
a statement that appears self-contradictory but underlines a single truth
Imagery
The pattern of related comparative aspects of language, particularly of images, in a literary work
Denotation
the dictionary meaning of a word
Whitman
"When I Heard the Learned Astronomer"
ballad
long poem that tells a story (song)
Narrative poem
A poem that tells a story
line
sequence of words printed sperately on a page
Envoy
A short final stanza of a poem
The Sick Rose
"O Rose, thou art sick!"
a repeated sound, word, phrase, line, or group of lines
refrain
Found Poem
poem using found words, phrases, and sentences
apostrophe
when a speaker or writer breaks off and directs speech to an imaginary person
elision
the omission of an unstressed vowel or syllable to preserve the meter of a line of poetry
rhyme scheme
a regular pattern of rhyming words in a poem
the art of criticizing a subject by ridiculing it without being rude or impolite
Define 'satire'
a kind of metaphor that uses like or as to compare two things
simile
acrostic poem
the first letter of each line spells a word, usually the same words as in the title
a line or group of lines in a poem separated from other groups of lines by extra white space
stanza
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