Literary Terms 35 Flashcards

Terms Definitions
Antagonist
villain 
feeble
physically week
Ornate
Elaborately decorated
understatement
opposite of exaggeration
innovative
introducing something new
rhetorical modes
patterns of organization
Tone
How the author feels
parallelism
repetition of grammatical structure
protagonist
main character of literary work
setting
where the story takes place
"47. simile"
"comparison using �like,� �as,� or �than�: �He�s as messy as a pig.�"
First Person Point of View
Profound
Having great depth or seriousness
Foot
A metrical unit of poetry
foreshadow
to show or indicate beforehand; prefigure
Alliteration
the repetition of initial consonant sounds in consecutive words
elegy
a mournful, melancholic or plaintive poem, especially a funeral song or a lament for the dead
consonance
the repitition of consonant sounds within and at the end of words.
a reference to something literary, mythological, or historical that the author assumes the reader will recognize
allusion
Imagery
Language that appeals to the senses
style or manner of expression (experienced by the author)
tone
Aside
Dialogue intended for the audience, and supposedly not heard by actors on the stage
Existentialism
A philosophy that emphasizes the uniqueness and isolation of the individual experience in a hostile or indifferent universe
pejorative
describing words or phrases that belittle or speak negatively of someone
The arrangments of words into sentences, used by the author to convey tone, purpose, or effect
Syntax
subside
v.
 
the bunny subsided into the ground until i only saw its tail.
tragedy
play, novel, or other narrative, depicting serious and important events, in which the main character comes to an unhappy end
conflict
to come into collision or disagreement; be contradictory, at variance, or in opposition; clash:
moral
lesson that a story intends to teach
diction
the selection and arrangement of words in a literary work
ode
long, stately poem in stanzas of varied length, meter, and form
annotation
explanatory or critical notes added to a text
MOOD
An atmosphere created by a writer's diction and the details selected.
Simile
nouna figure of speech involving the comparison of one thing with another thing of a different kind, used to make a description more emphatic or vivid (e.g., as brave as a lion, crazy like a fox).
a real or fictional episode; a division of an act in a play
scene
PLAGIARISM
To use someone elses words without giving them credit.
metaphor
comparison of two things without using "like" or "as"
personification
a figure of speech where animals, ideas, or inorganic objects are given human characteristics.
"42. assonance"
"repetition of vowel sounds inside words"
irony
strictly a sub-set of allegory: irony not only says one thing and means another, but says one thing and means its opposite. The word is used often of consciously inappropriate or understated utterances (so two walkers in the pouring rain greet each other with 'lovely day!', 'yes, isn't it'). Irony depends upon the audience's being able to recognise that a comment is deliberately at odds with its occasion, and may often discriminate between two kinds of audience: one which recognises the irony, and the other which fails to do so. Dramatic irony occurs when an audience of a play know some crucial piece of information that the characters onstage do not know (such as the fact that Oedipus has unwittingly killed his father).
Pun
Using the double meaning of words to add a humourous effect.
FLASHBACK
the depiction of an incident which occurred before the opening of a work
Antimetabole
reversing the order of repeated words or phrases (a loosely chiastic structure, AB-BA) to intensify the final formulation, to present alternatives, or to show contrast
 

Ask not what you can do for rhetoric, but what rhetoric can do for you.
meter
pattern of rhythm determined by the relationship between the accented and unaccented syllables in a line of poetry
analogy
a similarity or comparison between two different things or the realtionship between them.
characterization
method used to develop a character through appearance, actions, thoughts etc.
Theme
A central idea, concern, or purpose of a literary work.
claim (categorial assertion)
EVERY, NONE, NO VERY, ALL
foil
to prevent the success of; frustrate; balk:
Paradox
a statement that seems contrary to common sense yet may, in fact, be true.
POV
What does the P in PDIDLS stand for?
monologue
a long speech given by one character to another character(s)
Motivation
A driving force that causes us to achieve goals.
Person vs. person
Two characters struggle with each other. Often, it’s the protagonist (hero) vs. the antagonist (the villain).
CHARACTERS ACTIONS
What a character does in a play.
point of view
perspective, or vantage point, from which a story is told
Apollonian
In contrast to Dionysian, it refers to the most noble, godlike qualities of human nature and behavior
rhythm
the pattern of sound created by the arrangements of stressed and unstressed syllables especially in poetry
Omniscient
Narrator sees into the minds of more than one character.
Foreshadowing
The introduction early in a story of verbal and dramatic hints that suggest what is to come later.
Free Verse
Poetry written without strict meter or rhyme
DIALOGUE
TWO BASIC MEANINGS: A) THE SPEECH OF CHARACTERS IN ANY KIND OF NARRATIVE, STORY OR PLAY; B) A LITERARY GENRE IN WHICH 'CHARACTERS' DISCUSS A SUBJECT AT LENGTH.
Utopia
An imaginary place or state of ideal perfection
alexandrine
a line of iambic hexameter; the final line of a Spenserian stanza is an alexandrine
 
Connotation
What a word suggests beyond its basic definition; a word's overtone of meaning
Cadence
The natural rise and fall of a language as it is normally spoken
Anecdote
A very brief story, told to illustrate a point or serve as an example of something.
symbol
a person, place, event, or object that has a meaning in itself but suggest other meanings as well; something that represents somehthing other than itself
didactic
teaching or intending to teach a moral lesson.
Tragic Hero
a character who experiences an inner struggle because of a character flaw.
formal language
The use of "high" language or dialect in preference to "low" language or dialect; academic language
waft
to move or be moved lightly over water or air; to drift
PERSUASIVE WRITING
Persuasive writing is one of the four forms of discourse, which uses reason and emotional appeals to convince a reader to think or act in a certain way.
Denotation
Literal meaning of a word as defined. Dictionary definition.
Verbal Irony
Verbal irony is a figure of speech.  The speaker intends to be understood as meaning something that contrasts with the literal or usual meaning of what he says.  The different sorts of discrepancy between the meaning of what is said and what is in fact on the particular occasion meant with it give rise to different kinds of verbal irony:
 
Example:  Mother comes into the TV room and discovers her 11-year-old watching South Park instead of doing his homework, as he was set to a dozen minutes ago.  Pointing to the screen she says, "Don't let me tempt you from your duties, kiddo, but when you're finished with your serious studies there, maybe we could take some time out for recreation and do a little math."
1st Persion
The narrator is a character in the story
I, me my
narrator
the teller of the story; not to be confused with the author
Rhetorical Question
A question asked for an effect, and not actually requiring an answer.
subject complement
the word or clause that follows a linking verb and complements, or completes, the subject of the sentence by either renaming it or describing it
Enter your front text here.
Enter your back text here.
Allegory
A work of literature or item in a work that is completely symbolic of something different.
A type of poem in which the speaker gives an account of a dramatic moment in his life and, in doing so, reveals his character.
Dramatic Monologue
Third person limited point of view
A person outside the story tells the story; unknown narrator
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