Poetry Terms 7 Flashcards

Terms Definitions
glee
joy
couplet
2 lines
monosyllabic
one syllable--stressed
meter
rhythmical pattern
Hexameter
Six feet
quatrain
4 line stanza
Subject Matter
The plot
Genre
theme or type
The Lanyard
Billy Collins
Parallelism
Arrangement of words/phrases/sentences side by side in a similar gramatical structure
slant/approximate rhyme
any: slash, slosh
Sonnet
Iambic Meter
14 Lines
Quatrain, Couplet at the bottom
Type of lyric poetry
Speaker
Voice that is talking
euphemism
replacing harsh sayings
borrowed money without asking- stole
Dynamic
a character that changes
Dramatic Monologue
Soliloquy in a play
simile
comparison using like or as
euphany
the pleasent, mellifluous presentation of sounds in literary work.
Personification
giving non-human things, human-like qualities
Narrative
Poems that tell a story
Denotation
exact meaning, doesn't express feeling
T.S. Eliot
a male Modernism poet
inversion
reversal of normal word order
Metaphor
comparison not using "like" or "as"
allusion
reference to a well-known person, place, place, event, literary work, work of art that the poet expect the reader to recognize
heroic couplet
two end-stopped iambic pentameter lines rhymed aa, bb, cc, with the though usually completed in the two-line unit
Conceit
The term designates fanciful notion, usually expressed through and elaborate analogy and pointing to a striking parallel between ostensible dissimilar things. A Petrarchan Conceit may elaborately and extenisively compare love to some tangible object such as a rose, a ship, or a garden.
Trochee
Two syllables, stress followed by unstressed. "The Tiger" has trochaic feet in its first line.
Lyric Poem
Personal, reflective poetry that reveals the speaker's thoughts and feelings about the subject.
oxymoron
a single phrase that juxtaposes opposite terms
spondee
two syllables equally or almost equally accented
1700
emily dickinson wrote how many poems
Symbol
Something concrete used to represent something abstract
Foot
The combination of stressed and unstressed syllables, which make up the metric unit of a line
stress
the emphasis that falls on certain syllables and not others (ex- proDUCE vs. PROduce)
Espouse (v)
to adopt or to support (p.46)
eye rhyme
rhyme that appears correct from spelling but does not rhyme because of pronunciation
Assonance
The repetition of vowel sounds "began to beat" in The Tiger is an example of this repetition
Rhythm
metrical form in a line of verse
symbolism
an object larger than life, what something means (symbolizes)
A representation of language using the five senses: sight, smell, taste, feeling and hearing.
Imagery
Satire
witty language used to convey insults or scorn
onomatopoeia
words that imitate the sound they name
Irony
when say something but mean something else
imagery
the word "pictures" that written use to help understand the story
ballad
a narrative poem written in four-line stanzas, characterized by swift action and narrated in direct style
enjambment
continuation of a complete idea from one line or stanza to another
caesura
pause, usually within a line (after commas)
Sneer
To smile or laugh scornfully or critically
diction
writer or speaker's choice of words; key element of style
William Shakespeare wrote many of his plays in _______
blank verse
Structure
The way a piece of writing is constructed and organised
Alliteration
The repetition of the same or similar sounds at the beginning of words. Some famous examples of alliteration are tongue twisters such as Betty Botta bought some butter and Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.
rhyme
The occurrence of the same or similar sounds at the end of two or more words. The pattern is shown by using a different letter for each final sound.
Apostrophe
A figure of speech in which one directly addresses an absent or imaginary person, or some abstraction
Tone
the authors attitude toward what he or she has written
refrain
repetition of one or more phrases or lines at definite intervals in a poem
parody
a statement that reveals a kind of truth although it seems at first to be self-contradictory and untrue
Slant Rhyme
the vowels or the consonants of stressed syllables are identical
Figurative Language
words of phrases that describes one thing in terms of another, not meant to be taken literal
18. Informal diction
represents the plain language of everyday use, and often includes idiomatic expressions, slang, contractions, and many simple, common words.
Prose genre divisions
fiction (novels & short stories), nonfiction ( biography , autobiography, letters, essays and reports
dramatic irony
when a character says or does something that has more or different meanings from what he thinks it means, though the audience and/or other characters do understand the full ramification of the speech or action
understatement
a figure of speech that consists of saying less than one means, or saying what one means with less force than the occasion warrants
italian sonnet
abbaabba cdecde, it is composed of one octave and one sestet
English (Shakespearean) Sonnet
uses iambic pentameter- abab cdcd efef gg- a four part argument expressing a single thought or emotion- each quatrain usually contains a separate development of the sonnet's central idea with the couplet providing a conclusion.
Hyperbole or overstatement
adds emphasis without intending to be literally true
masculine rhyme
rhyme that occurs in a final stressed syllable
Stanza
Refers to a grouping of lines set off by a space that usually has a set pattern of meter and rhyme
literary allusion
a reference to a person, place, or thing from previous literature; the 3 most popular : bible, shakespeare, and mythology
Metaphysical Conceit
term used to describe the works of 17th century poets who used "conceits" which are unusual and surprising comparisons between very different things
free verse
poetry that has no fixed pattern of meter
iambic pentameter
a common meter in poetry, a 10 syllable line
Dramatic
a poem written in the voice of a character assumed by the poet
internal rhyme
a word inside a line rhymes with another word on the same line
Dramatic Poetry
poetry in which one or more characters speak. Usually noted by quotation marks.
Syntax
the way words are put together to form a sentence
Synecdoche
Using part of a whole to stand for the whole (ex: All hands on deck. Hands = sailors)
Concrete Poem
a poem that makes a picture on the page with words or letters.
terza rima
a verse form with a rhyme scheme: aba bcb cdc, etc.
How does poetry state the ordinary?
as though it were extraordinary
occasional poem
a poem written for a particular for a particular occation
who was the first poet to read at a presidential inaguration?
robert frost
Closed form poetry
a type of form or structure in poetry characterized by regularity and consistency such as rhyme, line length, metrical pattern
hapless
unlucky
trees
joyce kilmer
Lyric
musical poetry
Trochaic
hard, soft
base details
siegfield sasson
Rhyme, Masculine, Feminine
...
e.e. cummings
buffalo bill's
Carpe Diem
Seize the day
Tonight I can write
Neruda
father of haiku
Matsuo Basho
Pun
a play on words
Lord Alfred Tennyson
The Eagle
Textual
symbol just in this book
Ambiguity
The multiple meanings, either intentional or unintentional, of a word, phrase, sentence, or passage.
iambic tetrameter
Passionate Shepard
Nymphs Reply
meter that is four feet or beat
iambic (2 syllables)
tetrameter (4 feet per poem)
Bereft (adj)
deprived of or lacking something
Paradox
A statement that seems contradictory but isn't (extended Oxymoron)
Haiku
traditional Japanese poetry with 17 syllables, broken into three lines with 5, 7, and 5 syllables, respectively (usually about nature)
Euphony
Smooth language; pleasant to the ears
Verse
line or lines of a poem
end stop
end of line with punctuation
epyllion
treats mythological subjects and love themes
connotation
what a word suggests to you
tetrameter
a metrical line containing four feet
Epic
long narrative about a serious subject, told in an elevated style
interpret
give an interpretation or explanation to
dialogue
conversation between 2 or more characters; tells u what ur supposed to see
synesthesia
the poetic description of a sense impression in terms of another sense, as in "a loud perfume" or an "icy voice"
allegory
a narrative or description having a second mening beneath the surface one
Exact rhyme
indicates identicle consonant or vowel sounds
a very short, humorous or nonsensical poem
limerick
Poem
a text that uses stanzas and figurative language
Elegy
A lyric poem written to commemorate someone who has died. No distinct, fixed pattern
Image
a verbal approximation of a sensory impression, concept, or emotion
dialect
spoken by definable groups of people from a particular geographic region, economic group, or social class
alliteraton
the repetition of sounds, most often consonant sounds, at the beginning of words. Gives emphasis to words.
concrete poetry
poetry which contains a strongly visual element
anapest
2 unstressed syllables followed by 1 stressed syllable.
23. Connotation
associations and implications that go beyond the literal meaning of a word, which derive from how the word has been commonly used and the associations people make with it.
theme
the central message or insight into life revealed through a literary work
blank verse
Poetry written in unrhymed iambic pentameter
figures of speech
expressions, such as similes, metaphors, and personifications, that make imaginative, rather than literal, comparisons or associations.
narrative poem
tells a story that includes plot, characters, and setting.
aubade
a poem about dawn; a morning love poem; or a poem about the parting of lovers at dawn
The cuckoo's song is unpleasing to the unmarried ear
synecdoche
repetittion
a poet chooses a word that significat to the meaning of the poem and repets it to give it emphasis
rhyme scheme
the pattern of rhyme in a poem
metonymy
when something is referred to by a specific aspect or detail
narrative poetry
is a verse that tells a story.
Anaphora
The repetition of words or phrases at the beginning of lines
Enamel
A cosmetic or paint that gives a smooth, glossy appearance
expected rhythm
the rhythmic expectation set up by the basic meter of a poem
a pair of rhyming lines usually of the same length and meter. expresses a single idea
couplet
a word, phrase, or group of lines that repeat in a poem
Repetition/Refrain
Endstop
Line feels like it ends with a comma or period
39. Apostrophe
An address, either to someone who is absent and therefore cannot hear the speaker or to something nonhuman that cannot comprehend
Traditional Poetry
A form of literary art in which language is used for its aesthetic and evocative qualities in addition to its meaning
form
the physical structure of a poem on a page
haiku structure
17 syllables: lines 1 and 3 have 5; line 2 has 7
end rhyme
rhyme that occurs at the end of lines, rather than within them
1st person point-of-view
the narrator speaks as "I" and the narrator is a character in the story who may or may not influence events within it
Figure of Speech
Way of saying one thing in terms of something else
occurs at the end of the line with a double syllable word
double end rhyme
turistas
turists
Hyperbole
Exaggeration
repetons
repeated lines
Sestet
six lines
hyberbole
extreme exaggeration
Mending Wall
Robert Frost
slough
to cast off
romance
poem containing knights
EB
taught herself Hebrew
monometer
one foot per line
dimeter
two feet per line
conceits
strange or fanciful ideas
visual
of or pertaining to sight
Concrete words
Things you can touch
pattern
Anything repeated in a predictable combination.
Denotations
literal, dictionary meanings of a word
syntactical unit
read entire phrases/sentences rather than reading by line of poetry
consonance
The repetition of similar consonant sounds in a group of words.
masculine/feminine rhyme
final stressed syllables/ final unstressed syllables
Surprise Endings
End strongly with an unexpected ending
emblematic verse
also called calligramme or concrete poem; a poem in which the words or letters form a typographical picture, either imitating how something looks or suggesting what the subject does
Accent
emphasis given one or more syllables in a word
lyric poetry
poetry that expresses a speaker's feelings w/o telling a story
warble
n. a melodious succession of low pleasing sounds; a musical trill
static character
•A character who remains the same.
pyrric foot
(uu) to unstressed syllables; this type is rare and is found between other types of feet
Dickinson
There is no frigate like a book
English sonnet
14-lined poem composed of three quatrains and a rhyming couplet
rime royal
seven lines of iambic pentameter rhyming ABABBCC and was used by the king James of Scottland
Blason
An ordered poem of praise or blame, proceeding detail by detail; also, and econmium for one's beloved.
Enjambment.
The running over of a sentence or thought into the next couplet or line without a pause at the end of the line; a run-on line. For example, the first two lines here are enjambed:
Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments. Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds
Or bends with the remover to remove. . . . -Shakespeare
Repetition
using the same word, phrase, or lines more than once
sensory language
language that appeals to the senses- used to create pictures in your imagination and help you experience what the poet describes
Epitaphs
lines composed to mark the death of someone
licet, licere, licui
it is lawful, it is allowed
ballads
poems that tell a story; like songs, they may have a chorus; often deal with adventure or romance
To His Coy Mistress
Andrew Marvell, English, mid 1600s
mixed metaphor
the inconsistent mixture of two or more metaphors; usually unintentional and often conjure ludicrous images
what is Milton's subject?
the fall of man- creation
Lyrical Poetry
A type of emotional songlike poetry, distinguished from dramatic and narrative poetry
Slant Rhymes
An almost rhyme; using words with similar sounds
pentameter
what oft was though, but ne'er so well express'd/ the bookful blockhead ignorantly read/with loads of learned lumber in his head
line
a group of words in a poem poets choose where to begin and end
Sarcasm
a type of irony in which a person appears to be praising something but is actually insulting it. Its purpose is to injure or to hurt
refrain (chorus)
a regularly repeated line or group of lines in a poem
rhyming couplets
a pair of rhyming lines that usually have the same meter and length
stanza forms
Couplet 2 line stanza
Triplet 3 line
Quatrain 4 line
Quintet 5 line
Sestet 6 line
Septet 7 line
Octave 8 line
9 line stanza
10 line stanza
limerick
Lines 1, 2, and 5 rhyme and has 3 beats......and lines 3 and 4 rhyme and each has 2 beats.
dactylic meter
meter in which a majority of feet are dactyls
Continous Form
form of a poem where the lines follow each other without formal grouping, the only breaks being dictated by units of meaning
4 types of poetry
1. narrative (tells a story), 2. lyric (expresses thoughts and feelings), 3. concrete (shaped to look like their subjects), 4. haiku and limericks (short poems that follow strict syllable patterns)
"Or gazing on the new soft fallen mask
Of snow upon the mountains and the moors"
"Bright Star" by John Keats
FS?:
From the crowd there went up a roar
Like the beating of waves on the shore.
simile

The "roar" was "like" a "beating wave"
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