English Poetry Terms 2 Flashcards

Terms Definitions
nebulous
hazy
Meditation
??
carl sandburg
grass
Pyrrhic
U U
Sonnet 18
William Shakespeare
Hyperbole
An extreme exaggerasion
Wrath
Forceful often vindictive anger
Dialect
unique pronunciations of words
masculine rhyme
one syllable rhymes
consonance
repetition of consonants, especially at the end of words
octave
a stanza of eight lines.
equivocal
(adj)- having two or more significations, having double meaning; of uncertain nature or classification
Alliteration
repeated consonant sounds at hte beginning of successive words as in "few flocked to the flight" or "Peter Piper packed a peck of pickled peppers"
imagery
language that appeals to the senses
Metaphor
Direct comparison of two unlike things. Ex. calling a person a tiger
Personification
Giving human characteristics to non- human subjects
haiku
unrhymed poetic form with one observation in three lines; seventeen syllables
blank verse
unrhymed verse in iambic pentameter
Iambic
Foot of 2 syllables - weak/strong
allusion
reference to something outside the poem that carries a history of meaning and strong emotional associations
Enjambment
when a logical, grammatical phrase is interrupted by the end of a line and continues on the next line without pause or punctuation.
anaphora
a repetition of an identical word repeated in the beginning of lines
irony
a contradiction that extend beyond its use as a figure of speech
free verse
unrhymed verse without a consistent metrical pattern
dactylic meter
opposite of anapestic with one accented syllable followed by two unaccented syllables ( / u u )
Simile
the explicit comparison of two unlike objects using like or as
syntax
the order of words in a sentence
Tone
The implied attitude of a writer toward the subject and characters of a work, as for example, Flannery O'Connor's ironic tone in her "Good Country People."
Assonance
The repetition of identical or similar vowel sounds in neighboring words without the repetition of consonants.
speaker
like the narrator of a story, the ________ is the voice that addresses the reader
Rhyme
repetition of sounds at the ends of words
a stanza or poem consisting of 4 lines
quatrain
persona
the identity of the voice that speaks the words of a poem
mood
The state of feeling created by a poem.
epic
A lengthy narrative poem in which the character is a figure of heroic stature and tells a historical or legendary story objectively.
internal rhyme
rhyme within the same line of poetry
a rhyme that occurs within a line
internal rhyme
Pastoral Poem
A poem that deals with shepherds, flocks nature, love, ect.
leaves of grass
poetry volume that has walt whitman's poetry in it
Connotation
The set of ideas associated with it in addition to its explicit meaning; the secondary meaning.
dream deferred-langston hughes
What happens to a dream deferred?
Does it dry up
like a raisin in the sun?
Or fester like a sore--
And then run?
Does it stink like rotten meat?
Or crust and sugar over--
like a syrupy sweet?
Maybe it just sags
like a heavy load.
Or does it explode?
quatrain
a poem of four lines(each line has a rythm and similar syllable count)
Line Break
How a poet decides to end an individual line
extended metaphor
a metaphor that stretches out over an entire poem or through several lines
Rhyme scheme
The pattern of end rhymes used in a poem, usually marked by letters to symbolize correspondence
end-stopped line
a line ending in a full pause, often indicated by appropriate punctuation such as a period or semicolon.
On 1st Looking into Chapman's Homer
"Much have I traveled in the realms of gold, and many goodly states and kingdoms seen"
finesse
diplomacy
Denotation
dictionary definition
Robert Frost
Poet
elegy
A poem of lamentation
Scansion
Determing the Rhyme Scheme.
narrative poetry
tells a story
Tippet
a long scarf or shawl
Meter
number of "feet" per line
Foot
the smallest repeated pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables in a poetic line
sonnet
14 line poem ENGLISH: shakespearean ITALIAN: Petrarchan
symbol
something that stands for something else
Limerick
short, light-hearted, humorous poem, 5 lines with A-A-B-B-A rhyme scheme
"Macavity's not there...you may look up in the air" ; "he's very tall and thin...for his eyes are sunken in"
Rhyme scheme
Diction
the author's choice of words that creates tone, attitude, and style, as well as meaning
divert
to turn aside from a course; distract
lyric poem
poetry that expresses a speaker's emotions or thoughts and does not tell a story
hyperboyle
a figure of speech that uses deliberate exaggeration for emphasis
similes
make comparison by using word "like" or "as"
Onomatopoeia
words that sound like what they mean
afford
be able to spare or give up
Oxymoron
Two words that appear to contradict each other
aphorism
a concise, sometimes witty saying that expresses a principal, truth, or obervation about life
Wordsworth
 
The World Is Too Much With Us
 
Lines Composed a Few Miles From Tintern Abbey
It Is a Beautiful Evening
Stress
the emphasis, or accent, given a syllable in pronunciation.
Open Form
"Free verse"- no distinct rules or boundaries
v., to be dusted or lightly covered with dust
talcum
Theseus
The heroic Duke of Athens, engaged to Hippolyta.
Phonetic intensive
A word whose sound emphasizes its meaning.
ode
a poem inspired by or written for a person object or occurrance
metonymy
the use of a term associated with an image instead of using the image itself
setting
the time and place of a story or play
stanza
a group of two or more lines set together in a poem
words or phrases used in order to stimulate the senses
sensory details
the Big 6 refers to
William Blake, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, George Gordon Lord Byron, Percy Bysshe Shelley& John Keats
feminine/double rhyme
this is when the last two syllables of the words rhyme
Sensory Images
The use of details from any, some, or all of the five senses
Figurative Language
is writing or speech that is not meant to be taken literally
ceasura
a pause within a line of verse. It is not counted as part of the metrical pattern. The following line has a clear caesura in the middle:How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
What were the influences of the 'open form movement'?
1. 19th century: free verse- break from tradition- 'anti-close form' movementROMANTIC ERA poets2. William Wordsworth3. Walt Whitman~ themes: rebellion, self, transcendence, democracy, nature
offices
positions
four feet
tetrameter
firmament
the sky
un ventilateur
a fan
diaphanous
very sheer and light
couplet
two lines that rhyme
Spencerian
abab, bcbc, cdcd, ee
epithet
an adjective or other descriptive phrase that is regularly used to characterize a person, place, or thing
slant/imperfect rhyme
another name for half rhyme
literal
in accordance with, involving, or being the primary or strict meaning of the word or words; not figurative or metaphorical:
theme
a central message, concern, or purpose in a literary work
1789
The year the French Revolution began with a peasant revolt that sought to limit the powers of the Catholic church and weaken the power of the nobility and monarch.
Subject
What a story or play is about
Geoffrey Chaucer
1300's. England. French and Italian. The Canterbury Tales.
Dactyl
A metrical foot consisting of one accented syllable followed by two unaccented syllables
 
Ex. Mer-ri-ly
fester
to form pus; generate purulent matter; suppurate.
scanning
examination of a line of poetry to determine the number and type of feet
euphony
n. a pleasant and harmonious song or sound
Apostrophe
An adress to an absent or imaginary person.
poieien (Greek)
"to make." Poem comes from this word
-haiku-
three line japanese, 1st and 3rd have 5, the 2nd has 7
Lyric Poetry
Poems that are highly musical and express the observations and feelings of a single speaker
Herbert, Redemption
tenant wants new lease, goes to look for God in heaven, not there, finds him in a crapy place and grants him the new leas, then dies, resembles Jesus dying for the people, tenant is mankind and new and old lease is new and old testament
soliloquy
the act of talking while or as if alone. often used as a device in drama to disclose a character's innermost thoughts
WHO SPENT HIS LIFE TEACHING AND WRITING NATIVE AMERICAN FOLKLORE?
N. SCOTT MOMMADAY
End Rhyme
Occurs at the end of lines of poetry
masochist
one who enjoys his or her own pain and suffering
reflective (or meditative) structures
pondering a subject, theme, or event, and letting the mind play with it, skipping from one sound to another, or to related thought or subjects as the mind encounters them
What are some of attributes of modernists?
- straying from tradition particularly the Victorian period- rejection of traditional religion- often imagery is apocalyptic- they follow previous thinkers- many were totaliterians: picking a belief that can withstand chaos - period of 'isms' & 'manifests'
ban
curse
nickering
v. neighing
anapestic
u u /
Figures of Speech:
Oxymoron
Organization
structure of a piece
Anagogical
allegorical or spiritual interpretation, esp of sacred works such as the Bible
Form
external arrangement-does not equal content!
What was Out Out about?
War
Symbolism
An object represents an idea
synesthesia
using one sense to modify/describe another
rhetorical
language not appropriate to the situation
ephemeral
lasting a very short time; short-lived; transitory:
monosyllabic foot
a foot consisting of one syllable
Allegory
A symbolic narrative in which the surface details imply a secondary meaning; characters often represent moral qualities
Lyric
Brief poem of feelings of the speaker
peculiar words
in "blackberry eating," the berries falling onto the tongue represent?
Refrain
a repitition of a section of lines
Metrical Line
consists of a specific number of metrical feet
Folk ballads
relating to the traditional beliefs or ideas of ordinary people
Verse
A generic term used to describe poetic lines composed in a measured rhythmical pattern that are often rhymed.
poetic formsballad
a story told through poetry, usually to music
tercet
a triplet or stanza of three lines in which each line ends with the same rhyme
turn
a point in a poem when its meaning movies in a new and/or signifigant direction, or its theme emerges
Rhythm
the pattern of beats or stresses in a line of verses or prose.
iambic pentameter
the lines are written in a meter consisting of five iambic feet
v., to not drink, to be serious, to be in moderation
sobriety
Figure of speech
any way of saying something other than the ordinary way
What is a ballad?
Narrative poem that's intended to be sung.
When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer
"How soon unaccountable I became tired and sick, Till rising and gliding out I wandered off by myself"
/ 144
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