Vocab of Poetry Flashcards

Terms Definitions
Interpretation
explanation
gustatory
taste
Tetrameter
four feet
scholars
los eruditos
Lacedomonian Instruction
Blake
kinesthetic imagery
movement
to wordsworth
shelley
assonance
repeating vowel sound
the breeze
briza, brisa
the self
dickenson+whitman ideal
"My Number"
Billy Collins
Rhyme
Repetition of sound[s]
elegy
poem lamenting the dead
olfactory
represents sense of smell
lyrical
expresses feeling and emotions
The Bells
Edgar Allan Poe
Heptameter
7 feet per line
dialogue
verbal exchange between characters
EB
poetry about Italian oppression
iambic (iambs)
unstressed, stressed "New York"
speaker
the voice of the poem
Tanka
a form of Japanese poetry
parody
numerous imitation of another work.
paradox
contradictory statement that is true
quatrain
a stanza of four lines
Connotation
Meaning associated with a word
dialect
a special variety of language
simile
comparison using "like" or "as"
octameter eight feet per line
...
Lyric
a short poem of song-like quality
metaphor
the direct comparison of two dissimilar things not using like or as
Blank Verse
unrhymed verse (specifically unrhymed iambic pentameter)
ballad
a song, transmitted orally from generation to generation, that tells a story and that eventually is written down
Alliteration
the repetition of beginning consonant sounds in two or more words in a line of a poem.
allusion
an expression designed to call something to mind without mentioning it
ode
quatrains, two lines rhyme, romantic or dramatic, uses strophe
Counting stanzas
A strategy for understanding poetry
feminine rhyme
more than one syllable rhyme
Sonnet
a fourteen-line poem, usually in iambic pentameter with a definite rhyme scheme. (English: ABAB, CDCD, EFEF, GG; Italian: ABBAABBA, CDECDE).
Dramatic poetry
poetry written for the stage
iamb
a metrical foot: an unaccented syllable is followed by an accented one (u ' )
oxymoron
conjoining contradictory terms (as in 'deafening silence')
poem
a composition written with language selected for its beauty and sound. (may be written in verse or free verse)
couplet
a pair of lines, usually rhymed
Imagery
The formation of mental images, figures, or likenesses of things, or of such images collectively
foot
smallest repeated pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables in a poetic line
connotations
all the associations and emotions attached to a word
Rhythm
a musical quality produced by the repition of stressed and unstressed sylables or by the repititon of other sounds
onomatopoeia
the use of words that imitate sounds
free verse
contains neither regular rhyme nor regular meter
Symbol
An object, person, place, event, or quality that stands for something more than itself; something concrete that stands for something abstract
emily dickinson
who wrote "fame is a bee"?
haiku
an epigrammatic Japanese verse form of three short lines
limerick
A humorous, five-line poem in which lines 1, 2 and 5 rhyme and lines 3 and 4 rhyme.
limited
an inability to think imaginatively or independently
Poetic Diction
the use of elevated/ heightened language over ordinary language
Bishop
The Fish (person has caught a tremendous fish, but can't keep it because he/she admires the ugly thing)
Ambiguity
Unclearness by virtue of having more than one meaning.
hyperbole
an exaggeration used to create humor, to emphasize particular points, or to create dramatic effects
rythm
pattern created by hte stressed and unstressed syllables of words in sequence
Homage
n. honor, tribute, respect shown in public
second person
narrative mode in which the protagonist or another main character is referred to by employment of personal pronouns and other addressing forms such as 'you'
What dpes Satam accuse God of being?
tyrant
Poetic Device
way of writing, using figurative language to create specific effects
scansion
the process of analyzing a poem's metrical pattern
beckoned
(v) summoned by a silent motion; called
Fixed forms
are patterns that encompass a complete poem
refrain
a sound, word, phrase or line repeated regularly in a poem
tone
the attitude of the writer or speaker toward the subject or audience
irony
meaning the opposite of what is said (verbal irony)
Inversion
the reversel of the normal word order in a sequence or phrase
Narrative
Tells a true or imaginative story and has character, setting, plot, theme and a point of view.
jargon
a category of language defined by a trade or profession
extended metaphor
a sustained comparison in which part of all of a poem consists of a series of related metaphors
Poetry
an expressive form of writing that is meant to be enjoyed by the reader
Step 10
Answer the questions: What is this poem about? What is the author's purpose in writing this poem? What is the main idea of this poem
Soliloquy
Speech by a character, usually in a play, that is delivered when the speaker is alone, and is sometimes addressed to the audience.
verso
cada una de las líneas de un poema
didactic poetry
designed to teach an ethical, moral, or religious lesson
Internal Rhyme
When the rhyme happens inside the rhyme
line breaks
where the poet hit return twice, perhaps they decided to put an a star; or this could be where an enjambment happens
Narrator
someone who tells a story that is (imaginary voice)
Carpe diem
Seize the day; theme of Cavalier poetry
didactic poem
poetry having a primary purpose to teach or preach
ballad meter
a four-line stanza rhymed abcd with four feet in lines one three and three feet in line two and four.
A very short, witty poem: “Sir, I admit your general rule,/That every poet is a fool,/But you yourself may serve to show it,/That every fool is not a poet.” (Samuel Taylor Coleridge
Epigram
dead metaphor
a metaphor that has become so overused that we no longer realize that it is a figure of speech- we simply skip over the metaphorical connection it makes.
ex: roof of the mouth, eye of the storm, heart of the matter, arm of the chair
satirical: criticizing Mr. Artesian for the ridiculous lengths he goes to to save time
tone in "Mr. Artesian's Conscientiousness"
Shakespearean sonnet
Or English sonnet, has a rhyme scheme of abab cdcd efef gg. Often there is a volta, or turn, in the final couplet.
sensory words
writing or speech that appeals to one or more of the five senses
author's purpose
the reason the author wrote the piece of literature.
concrete poetry
poetry that acts out the meaning of the word
Pyrrhic Foot
A two syllable foot with no syllables stressed.
Stopping by the woods on a snowy evening
Robert Frost
stichic
poetry in a single block of lines, not divided into stanzas
understatement
A figure of speech in which a writer or speaker says less than what he or she means; the opposite of exaggeration.
Figurative Language
Writing or speech not meant to be interpreted literally; language that uses the three _____ of speech: metaphor, simile, personification.
accentual-syllabic meter
unit was the foot, combination of 2 or 3 stressed and unstressed syllables
End-stopped line
definite pause at the end of a verse due to punctuation
end rhyme
rhyming words at the end of two or more lines of poetry
type of poem with no ryme and based in nature
Haiku
Line break
the point at which one line ends and the next begins
rhyme that occurs at the end of a verse.
End Rhyme
line
a group of words in a row; one unit of a poem
figurative language/figure of speech
Writing or speech that is used to create vivid impressions by setting up comparisons between dissimilar things, or describing one thing in terms of a dissimilar thing
Composed upon Westminister Bridge, William Wordworth
Ne'er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep!
The river glideth at his own sweet will:
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