Vocabulary - Poetry Part I Flashcards

Terms Definitions
embroider
bordar
Glee
Joy
imagery
sensory poetry
pun
humorise saying
knell
funeral bell
hyperbole
extreme exaggeration
Stanza
Group of lines
gustatory imagery
taste imagery
Sir Patrick Spence
Anonymous
Federico Garcia Lorca
Spain
quintain
five line stanza
cacophony
harsh, discordant, unpleasant-sounding choice and arrangement of sounds
octave
an 8 line stanza
The Streets of Laredo
ballad
assonance
repetition of vowel sounds
Septet
a seven line stanza
Trochaic
stressed, unstressed (Ex. FOOTball)
personification
giving animals, ideas, abstractions, and inanimate objects human form or personality
structure
how a poem is organized
"Lament for a Maidenhead"
Sappho, epithalamion
metonymy
something associated with something else which represents a whole
hypergelast
n. one who laughs excessively
Paradox
a seemingly self-contradictory or absurd statement that is still true such as "the more we learn, the less we know" or the idea that one must sometimes be cruel to be kind. Meaning or symbolism is developed or emphasized by the use or apparent opposites; unbelievable.
hexameter
systematically arranged and measureed rhythm in verse. rhythm that continuously repeats a single basic pattern. rhythm chararcterized by regular recurrance of a systematic arrangement of basic patterns in larger figures
alliteration
repetition of initial identical consonant sounds
Symbol
Something that represents an idea
QUATRAIN
a stanza of four lines
simile
comparison made between two things through the use of a specific word of comparison such as like or as
Extended simile/metaphor
Simile/Metaphor that functions as controlling image of whole work.
ballad
Short, dramatic, narrative poem, an oral tradition usually containing a tragic theme.
consonance
repetition of similar final consonant sounds at the ends of words or accented syllables
John Donne, Song
Then fear not me,
stresses and pauses
used to add emphasis
sonnet
fourteen line poem in iambic pentameter
limerick
five anapestic lines usually rhyming aabba
metaphor
Comparing two unalike things without using like or as
Rhyme
Repetition of similar sounds usually at the ends of the lines of poetry
landscape
always projected outward from the writing self; always interpreted by the poet (a poet who loves nature will not tell a sweet poem about the bustlin' city)
quatrains
4 lines sections of a poem
narrative poem
Verse that tells a story
octet
a musical composition written for eight performers
meter
poetic measure; arrangement of words in regularly measured, patterned, or rhythmic lines or verses.
Dactylic
One stressed syllable followed by two unstressed syllables.
Inference
to dram a conclusion about something; an educated guess
Lyric
a genre of poetry that presents personal feeling, which are marked by imagination, melody or emotion.
verse
general term for works of poetry usually referring to poems that incorporate some kind of metric structure
understatement
a statement that is restrained in ironic contrast to what might have been said
Doggerel
Light verse which is humorous and comic by nature
anapestic foot
two unaccented syllables followed by an accented syllable
iambic meter
unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable
Exact rhyme
words rhyme in exactly every way
allegory
story where everything is symbolic and metaphoric
rhythm
the pattern formed by stressed and unstressed syllables
clarity
the quality or state of being clear
scansion
the process of measuring verse, of marking accented and unaccented syllables
onomatopoeia
words that imitate the sound they describe, such as buzz and crack
enjambment
the continuation of the sense and grammatical construction from one line of poetry to the next. Milton's Paradise Lost is notable for its use of enjambment, as seen in the following lines:
. . . .Or if Sion hill
Delight thee more, and Siloa's brook that flow'd
Fast by the oracle of God, . . . .
sensory language
something you or the poem describesusing the 5 scenses
anaphora
the regular repetition of the same word or phrase at the beginning of successive phrases or clauses
lyric poem
poetry that often expresses personal emotions or thoughts
ballade
a poem consisting commonly of three stanzas having an identical rhyme scheme, followed by an envoy, and having the same last line for each of the stanzas and the envoy.
Narrative poetry
poetry that tells a story in verse.
haiku
a short poem that originated in Japan focesed on nature usually serious may or may not rhyme in a 5,7,5 stanza line
free verse
poetry without a regular meter or rhyme scheme
anachronism
something located at a time when it could not have existed or occurred
foot
metrical unit by which a line is measured; usually consists of one stressed and one or two unstressed syllables
Rhyme Scheme
marking the ending to show matching lines; abab, cdcd
Theme
a unifying idea that is a recurrent element in a literary or artistic work
Dramatic Irony
When the readers know something the characters don't
iambic pentameter
lines have five metrical feet, that is, the pattern of an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable happens five times per line.
syntax
the ordering of words into patterns or sentences. If a poet shifts words from the usual word order, you know you are dealing with an older style of poetry or a poet who wants to shift emphasis onto a particular word.
The Cucumber
Nazim Hikmet
(SUMMARY: It is snowing outside and people are looking at a cucumber with amazement
THEME: There is hope even in the darkest times
USES: Symbols: spring=change, growth; hope, change=cucumber; snow=death, sadness; daisy=growth, life, spring. similes, personification
TONE: hopeful, amazement)
english sonnet
a.k.a Shakespearean Sonnet - 14 lines of iambic pentameter: abab cdcd efef gg
epitaph
a short, often humorous poem to mark someone's death (may appear on tombstone)
Sonnets
All fourteen lines long, each line in imabic pentameter, and each poet using a particular rhyme scheme that remains consistent through the whole sonnet cycle
end-stopped
ending punctuation at the end of a line
Figurative language
nonliteral way of examining one thing of another through a figure of speech (e.g., metaphor, simile, personification, symbol)
ellipsis
the omission from a sentence or other construction of one or more words that would complete or clarify the construction, as the omission of who are, while I am, or while we are from I like to interview people sitting down.
irony
a state of affairs or an event that seems contrary to what one expects and is often amusing as a result
verbal irony
speaker in poem says one thing but means the opposite
literary ballad
a narrative poem that is written in deliberate imitation of the language, form, and spirit of the traditional ballad
allusion
a link to some person, place, or event that has literary, historical, or geographical significance
approximate rhyme
words sound the same or similar but are not spelled the same
Languish
to be or become weak or feeble; droop; fade.
antithesis
A figure of speech in which words and phrases with opposite meanings are balanced against each other.
shakespearean sonnet
A fourteen line poem with a specific rhyme scheme. The poem is written in three quatrains and ends with a couplet. The rhyme scheme is abab cdcd efef gg
ballad stanza
rhyming pattern of a stanza with four lines -- lines 2 and 4 rhyme
QUANTITATIVE SYLLABICS
WHEN THE NUMBER OF SYLLABLES PER LINE VARIES
Trochaic meter
a meter in which the majority of feet are trochees.
synecdoche
A figure of speech in which a part is used for the whole (as hand for sailor), the whole for a part (as the law for police officer), the specific for the general (as cutthroat for assassin), the general for the specific (as thief for pickpocket), or the material for the thing made from it (as steel for sword).
anapestic foot (uu/)
3 syllables with the stress on the last syllable
iambic foot
A two syllable foot with the stress on the second syllable; the most common foot of the English language
End Rhyme
the rhyme the occurs at the end of the line
and you, my father
direct address in do not go gentle into that good night
theme for songs of exp
in order to achieve self awarness it is necessary to live your life with the innocence of childhood yet you must also have an awarness and understanding of things around you
no every person has to the pretties to be loved
what is the theme from sonnet 130
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