GATE 1-2, Grammar: Compound Sentences - Parts Flashcards

Terms Definitions
[Shelley] brought potato salad, and I made apple pie.
subject
Shelley [brought] potato salad, and I made apple pie.
verb
Shelley brought [potato] salad, and I made apple pie.
adjective
Shelley brought potato [salad], and I made apple pie.
direct object
Shelley brought potato salad, [and] I made apple pie.
conjunction
Shelley brought potato salad, and [I] made apple pie.
subject
Shelley brought potato salad, and I [made] apple pie.
verb
Shelley brought potato salad, and I made [apple] pie.
adjective
Shelley brought potato salad, and I made apple [pie].
direct object
[Give] your sister the teddy bear, and you can have any toy from the shelf.
verb
Give [your] sister the teddy bear, and you can have any toy from the shelf.
adjective
Give your [sister] the teddy bear, and you can have any toy from the shelf.
indirect object
Give your sister the [teddy] bear, and you can have any toy from the shelf.
adjective
Give your sister the teddy [bear], and you can have any toy from the shelf.
direct object
Give your sister the teddy bear, [and] you can have any toy from the shelf.
conjunction
Give your sister the teddy bear, and [you] can have any toy from the shelf.
subject
Give your sister the teddy bear, and you [can] have any toy from the shelf.
helping verb
Give your sister the teddy bear, and you can [have] any toy from the shelf.
verb
Give your sister the teddy bear, and you can have [any] toy from the shelf.
adjective
Give your sister the teddy bear, and you can have any [toy] from the shelf.
direct object
Give your sister the teddy bear, and you can have any toy [from the shelf].
prepositional phrase: adjective
[We] decreed the first rule unfair, and our opponents called us cry babies.
subject
We [decreed] the first rule unfair, and our opponents called us cry babies.
verb
We decreed the [first] rule unfair, and our opponents called us cry babies.
adjective
We decreed the first [rule] unfair, and our opponents called us cry babies.
direct object
We decreed the first rule [unfair], and our opponents called us cry babies.
object complement: adjective
We decreed the first rule unfair, [and] our opponents called us cry babies.
conjunction
We decreed the first rule unfair, and [our] opponents called us cry babies.
adjective
We decreed the first rule unfair, and our [opponents] called us cry babies.
subject
We decreed the first rule unfair, and our opponents [called] us cry babies.
verb
We decreed the first rule unfair, and our opponents called [us] cry babies.
direct object
We decreed the first rule unfair, and our opponents called us [cry] babies.
adjective
We decreed the first rule unfair, and our opponents called us cry [babies].
object complement: noun
[Laura] became a famous dancer in New York City, and her sister stayed in Tucson and cared for their mother.
subject
Laura [became] a famous dancer in New York City, and her sister stayed in Tucson and cared for their mother.
linking verb
Laura became a [famous] dancer in New York City, and her sister stayed in Tucson and cared for their mother.
adjective
Laura became a famous [dancer] in New York City, and her sister stayed in Tucson and cared for their mother.
predicate nominative
Laura became a famous dancer [in New York City], and her sister stayed in Tucson and cared for their mother.
prepositional phrase: adjective
Laura became a famous dancer in New York City, [and] her sister stayed in Tucson and cared for their mother.
conjunction
Laura became a famous dancer in New York City, and [her] sister stayed in Tucson and cared for their mother.
adjective
Laura became a famous dancer in New York City, and her [sister] stayed in Tucson and cared for their mother.
subject
Laura became a famous dancer in New York City, and her sister [stayed] in Tucson and cared for their mother.
verb
Laura became a famous dancer in New York City, and her sister stayed [in Tucson] and cared for their mother.
prepositional phrase: adverb
Laura became a famous dancer in New York City, and her sister stayed in Tucson [and] cared for their mother.
conjunction
Laura became a famous dancer in New York City, and her sister stayed in Tucson and [cared] for their mother.
verb
Laura became a famous dancer in New York City, and her sister stayed in Tucson and cared [for their mother].
prepositional phrase: adverb
[Our] old car needs repairs again, and I hate riding the bus.
adjective
Our [old] car needs repairs again, and I hate riding the bus.
adjective
Our old [car] needs repairs again, and I hate riding the bus.
subject
Our old car [needs] repairs again, and I hate riding the bus.
verb
Our old car needs [repairs] again, and I hate riding the bus.
direct object
Our old car needs repairs [again], and I hate riding the bus.
adverb
Our old car needs repairs again, [and] I hate riding the bus.
conjunction
Our old car needs repairs again, and [I] hate riding the bus.
subject
Our old car needs repairs again, and I [hate] riding the bus.
verb
Our old car needs repairs again, and I hate [riding the bus].
gerund phrase: direct object
[To finish my homework], I worked for three hours, and to write your birthday poem, I refused to sleep.
infinitive phrase: adverb
To finish my homework, [I] worked for three hours, and to write your birthday poem, I refused to sleep.
subject
To finish my homework, I [worked] for three hours, and to write your birthday poem, I refused to sleep.
verb
To finish my homework, I worked [for three hours], and to write your birthday poem, I refused to sleep.
prepositional phrase: adverb
To finish my homework, I worked for three hours, [and] to write your birthday poem, I refused to sleep.
conjunction
To finish my homework, I worked for three hours, and [to write your birthday poem], I refused to sleep.
infinitive phrase: adverb
To finish my homework, I worked for three hours, and to write your birthday poem, [I] refused to sleep.
subject
To finish my homework, I worked for three hours, and to write your birthday poem, I [refused] to sleep.
verb
To finish my homework, I worked for three hours, and to write your birthday poem, I refused [to sleep].
infinitive phrase: direct object
[Searching his memory], Michael began to recall some of the details, and I wrote down all of them.
participial phrase: adjective
Searching his memory, [Michael] began to recall some of the details, and I wrote down all of them.
subject
Searching his memory, Michael [began] to recall some of the details, and I wrote down all of them.
verb
Searching his memory, Michael began [to recall some of the details], and I wrote down all of them.
infinitive phrase: direct object
Searching his memory, Michael began to recall some [of the details], and I wrote down all of them.
prepositional phrase: adjective
Searching his memory, Michael began to recall some of the details, [and] I wrote down all of them.
conjunction
Searching his memory, Michael began to recall some of the details, and [I] wrote down all of them.
subject
Searching his memory, Michael began to recall some of the details, and I [wrote] down all of them.
verb
Searching his memory, Michael began to recall some of the details, and I wrote [down] all of them.
adverb
Searching his memory, Michael began to recall some of the details, and I wrote down [all] of them.
direct object
Searching his memory, Michael began to recall some of the details, and I wrote down all [of them].
prepositional phrase: adjective
The [student] politely raising a hand may answer the question, and I will ignore the student calling out.
subject
The student [politely raising a hand] may answer the question, and I will ignore the student calling out.
participial phrase: adjective
The student politely raising a hand [may] answer the question, and I will ignore the student calling out.
helping verb
The student politely raising a hand may [answer] the question, and I will ignore the student calling out.
verb
The student politely raising a hand may answer the [question], and I will ignore the student calling out.
direct object
The student politely raising a hand may answer the question, [and] I will ignore the student calling out.
conjunction
The student politely raising a hand may answer the question, and [I] will ignore the student calling out.
subject
The student politely raising a hand may answer the question, and I [will] ignore the student calling out.
helping verb
The student politely raising a hand may answer the question, and I will [ignore] the student calling out.
verb
The student politely raising a hand may answer the question, and I will ignore the [student] calling out.
direct object
The student politely raising a hand may answer the question, and I will ignore the student [calling out].
participial phrase: adjective
The [new] roof is waterproof, and all of the doors are weatherproof.
adjective
The new [roof] is waterproof, and all of the doors are weatherproof.
subject
The new roof [is] waterproof, and all of the doors are weatherproof.
linking verb
The new roof is [waterproof], and all of the doors are weatherproof.
predicate adjective
The new roof is waterproof, [and] all of the doors are weatherproof.
conjunction
The new roof is waterproof, and [all] of the doors are weatherproof.
subject
The new roof is waterproof, and all [of the doors] are weatherproof.
prepositional phrase: adjective
The new roof is waterproof, and all of the doors [are] weatherproof.
linking verb
The new roof is waterproof, and all of the doors are [weatherproof].
predicate adjective
[On Mondays] my favorite class is English, and on Tuesdays my favorite class is dance.
prepositional phrase: adverb
On Mondays [my] favorite class is English, and on Tuesdays my favorite class is dance.
adjective
On Mondays my [favorite] class is English, and on Tuesdays my favorite class is dance.
adjective
On Mondays my favorite [class] is English, and on Tuesdays my favorite class is dance.
subject
On Mondays my favorite class [is] English, and on Tuesdays my favorite class is dance.
linking verb
On Mondays my favorite class is [English], and on Tuesdays my favorite class is dance.
predicate noun
On Mondays my favorite class is English, [and] on Tuesdays my favorite class is dance.
conjunction
On Mondays my favorite class is English, and [on Tuesdays] my favorite class is dance.
prepositional phrase: adverb
On Mondays my favorite class is English, and on Tuesdays [my] favorite class is dance.
adjective
On Mondays my favorite class is English, and on Tuesdays my [favorite] class is dance.
adjective
On Mondays my favorite class is English, and on Tuesdays my favorite [class] is dance.
subject
On Mondays my favorite class is English, and on Tuesdays my favorite class [is] dance.
linking verb
On Mondays my favorite class is English, and on Tuesdays my favorite class is [dance].
predicate noun
[I] can buy the book, or you can lend it to me.
subject
I [can] buy the book, or you can lend it to me.
helping verb
I can [buy] the book, or you can lend it to me.
verb
I can buy the [book], or you can lend it to me.
direct object
I can buy the book, [or] you can lend it to me.
conjunction
I can buy the book, or [you] can lend it to me.
subject
I can buy the book, or you [can] lend it to me.
helping verb
I can buy the book, or you can [lend] it to me.
verb
I can buy the book, or you can lend [it] to me.
direct object
I can buy the book, or you can lend it [to me].
prepositional phrase: adverb
[Katie] will buy a new dress, or I will make one for her.
subject
Katie [will] buy a new dress, or I will make one for her.
helping verb
Katie will [buy] a new dress, or I will make one for her.
verb
Katie will buy a [new] dress, or I will make one for her.
adjective
Katie will buy a new [dress], or I will make one for her.
direct object
Katie will buy a new dress, [or] I will make one for her.
conjunction
Katie will buy a new dress, or [I] will make one for her.
subject
Katie will buy a new dress, or I [will] make one for her.
helping verb
Katie will buy a new dress, or I will [make] one for her.
verb
Katie will buy a new dress, or I will make [one] for her.
direct object
Katie will buy a new dress, or I will make one [for her].
prepositional phrase: adjective
[Give] me a high-five, or I am leaving.
verb
Give [me] a high-five, or I am leaving.
indirect object
Give me a [high-five], or I am leaving.
direct object
Give me a high-five, [or] I am leaving.
conjunction
Give me a high-five, or [I] am leaving.
subject
Give me a high-five, or I [am] leaving.
helping verb
Give me a high-five, or I am [leaving].
verb
[We] must stop spending all of our money, or we will be poor.
subject
We [must] stop spending all of our money, or we will be poor.
helping verb
We must [stop] spending all of our money, or we will be poor.
verb
We must stop [spending all of our money], or we will be poor.
gerund phrase: direct object
We must stop spending all [of our money], or we will be poor.
prepositional phrase: adjective
We must stop spending all of our money, [or] we will be poor.
conjunction
We must stop spending all of our money, or [we] will be poor.
subject
We must stop spending all of our money, or we [will] be poor.
helping verb
We must stop spending all of our money, or we will [be] poor.
linking verb
We must stop spending all of our money, or we will be [poor].
predicate adjective
[Roger] stole the money, or someone framed him.
subject
Roger [stole] the money, or someone framed him.
verb
Roger stole the [money], or someone framed him.
direct object
Roger stole the money, [or] someone framed him.
conjunction
Roger stole the money, or [someone] framed him.
subject
Roger stole the money, or someone [framed] him.
verb
Roger stole the money, or someone framed [him].
direct object
[Misty] and Murphy will find each other again, or I will lose all hope.
subject
Misty [and] Murphy will find each other again, or I will lose all hope.
conjunction
Misty and [Murphy] will find each other again, or I will lose all hope.
subject
Misty and Murphy [will] find each other again, or I will lose all hope.
helping verb
Misty and Murphy will [find] each other again, or I will lose all hope.
verb
Misty and Murphy will find [each] other again, or I will lose all hope.
adjective
Misty and Murphy will find each [other] again, or I will lose all hope.
direct object
Misty and Murphy will find each other [again], or I will lose all hope.
adverb
Misty and Murphy will find each other again, [or] I will lose all hope.
conjunction
Misty and Murphy will find each other again, or [I] will lose all hope.
subject
Misty and Murphy will find each other again, or I [will] lose all hope.
helping verb
Misty and Murphy will find each other again, or I will [lose] all hope.
verb
Misty and Murphy will find each other again, or I will lose [all] hope.
adjective
Misty and Murphy will find each other again, or I will lose all [hope].
direct object
[Philadelphia] will win the game, or you will owe me two desserts.
subject
Philadelphia [will] win the game, or you will owe me two desserts.
helping verb
Philadelphia will [win] the game, or you will owe me two desserts.
verb
Philadelphia will win the [game], or you will owe me two desserts.
direct object
Philadelphia will win the game, [or] you will owe me two desserts.
conjunction
Philadelphia will win the game, or [you] will owe me two desserts.
subject
Philadelphia will win the game, or you [will] owe me two desserts.
helping verb
Philadelphia will win the game, or you will [owe] me two desserts.
verb
Philadelphia will win the game, or you will owe [me] two desserts.
indirect object
Philadelphia will win the game, or you will owe me [two] desserts.
adjective
Philadelphia will win the game, or you will owe me two [desserts].
direct object
[Exercising regularly] will lower your cholesterol, or medicine will lower it.
gerund phrase: subject
Exercising regularly [will] lower your cholesterol, or medicine will lower it.
helping verb
Exercising regularly will [lower] your cholesterol, or medicine will lower it.
verb
Exercising regularly will lower [your] cholesterol, or medicine will lower it.
adjective
Exercising regularly will lower your [cholesterol], or medicine will lower it.
direct object
Exercising regularly will lower your cholesterol, [or] medicine will lower it.
conjunction
Exercising regularly will lower your cholesterol, or [medicine] will lower it.
subject
Exercising regularly will lower your cholesterol, or medicine [will] lower it.
helping verb
Exercising regularly will lower your cholesterol, or medicine will [lower] it.
verb
Exercising regularly will lower your cholesterol, or medicine will lower [it].
direct object
[We] waited in line for several hours, but Justin Bieber did not show up.
subject
We [waited] in line for several hours, but Justin Bieber did not show up.
verb
We waited [in line] for several hours, but Justin Bieber did not show up.
prepositional phrase: adverb
We waited in line [for several hours], but Justin Bieber did not show up.
prepositional phrase: adverb
We waited in line for several hours, [but] Justin Bieber did not show up.
conjunction
We waited in line for several hours, but [Justin Bieber] did not show up.
subject
We waited in line for several hours, but Justin Bieber [did] not show up.
helping verb
We waited in line for several hours, but Justin Bieber did [not] show up.
adverb
We waited in line for several hours, but Justin Bieber did not [show] up.
verb
We waited in line for several hours, but Justin Bieber did not show [up].
adverb
[Mickey] is handsome, but his family is awful.
subject
Mickey [is] handsome, but his family is awful.
linking verb
Mickey is [handsome], but his family is awful.
predicate adjective
Mickey is handsome, [but] his family is awful.
conjunction
Mickey is handsome, but [his] family is awful.
adjective
Mickey is handsome, but his [family] is awful.
subject
Mickey is handsome, but his family [is] awful.
linking verb
Mickey is handsome, but his family is [awful].
predicate adjective
[Richelle] gave me her house key, but I lost it.
subject
Richelle [gave] me her house key, but I lost it.
verb
Richelle gave [me] her house key, but I lost it.
indirect object
Richelle gave me [her] house key, but I lost it.
adjective
Richelle gave me her [house] key, but I lost it.
adjective
Richelle gave me her house [key], but I lost it.
direct object
Richelle gave me her house key, [but] I lost it.
conjunction
Richelle gave me her house key, but [I] lost it.
subject
Richelle gave me her house key, but I [lost] it.
verb
Richelle gave me her house key, but I lost [it].
direct object
[Swimming laps] has made my shoulders strong, but my back still hurts.
gerund phrase: subject
Swimming laps [has] made my shoulders strong, but my back still hurts.
helping verb
Swimming laps has [made] my shoulders strong, but my back still hurts.
verb
Swimming laps has made [my] shoulders strong, but my back still hurts.
adjective
Swimming laps has made my [shoulders] strong, but my back still hurts.
direct object
Swimming laps has made my shoulders [strong], but my back still hurts.
object complement: adjective
Swimming laps has made my shoulders strong, [but] my back still hurts.
conjunction
Swimming laps has made my shoulders strong, but [my] back still hurts.
adjective
Swimming laps has made my shoulders strong, but my [back] still hurts.
subject
Swimming laps has made my shoulders strong, but my back [still] hurts.
adverb
Swimming laps has made my shoulders strong, but my back still [hurts].
verb
[Chad] wanted to buy a houseboat, but Mitchell, his roommate, is afraid of water.
subject
Chad [wanted] to buy a houseboat, but Mitchell, his roommate, is afraid of water.
verb
Chad wanted [to buy a houseboat], but Mitchell, his roommate, is afraid of water.
infinitive phrase: direct object
Chad wanted to buy a houseboat, [but] Mitchell, his roommate, is afraid of water.
conjunction
Chad wanted to buy a houseboat, but [Mitchell], his roommate, is afraid of water.
subject
Chad wanted to buy a houseboat, but Mitchell, [his roommate], is afraid of water.
appositive phrase
Chad wanted to buy a houseboat, but Mitchell, his roommate, [is] afraid of water.
linking verb
Chad wanted to buy a houseboat, but Mitchell, his roommate, is [afraid] of water.
predicate adjective
Chad wanted to buy a houseboat, but Mitchell, his roommate, is afraid [of water].
prepositional phrase: adverb
[Having quickly fled the scene in his purple plaid pants], Michael felt safe, but the fashion police still busted him.
participial phrase: adjective
Having quickly fled the scene [in his purple plaid pants], Michael felt safe, but the fashion police still busted him.
prepositional phrase: adverb
Having quickly fled the scene in his purple plaid pants, [Michael] felt safe, but the fashion police still busted him.
subject
Having quickly fled the scene in his purple plaid pants, Michael [felt] safe, but the fashion police still busted him.
linking verb
Having quickly fled the scene in his purple plaid pants, Michael felt [safe], but the fashion police still busted him.
predicate adjective
Having quickly fled the scene in his purple plaid pants, Michael felt safe, [but] the fashion police still busted him.
conjunction
Having quickly fled the scene in his purple plaid pants, Michael felt safe, but the [fashion] police still busted him.
adjective
Having quickly fled the scene in his purple plaid pants, Michael felt safe, but the fashion [police] still busted him.
subject
Having quickly fled the scene in his purple plaid pants, Michael felt safe, but the fashion police [still] busted him.
adverb
Having quickly fled the scene in his purple plaid pants, Michael felt safe, but the fashion police still [busted] him.
verb
Having quickly fled the scene in his purple plaid pants, Michael felt safe, but the fashion police still busted [him].
direct object
[Her] short plaid shirtdress was cute, but she could not wear it to school.
adjective
Her [short] plaid shirtdress was cute, but she could not wear it to school.
adjective
Her short [plaid] shirtdress was cute, but she could not wear it to school.
adjective
Her short plaid [shirtdress] was cute, but she could not wear it to school.
subject
Her short plaid shirtdress [was] cute, but she could not wear it to school.
linking verb
Her short plaid shirtdress was [cute], but she could not wear it to school.
predicate adjective
Her short plaid shirtdress was cute, [but] she could not wear it to school.
conjunction
Her short plaid shirtdress was cute, but [she] could not wear it to school.
subject
Her short plaid shirtdress was cute, but she [could] not wear it to school.
helping verb
Her short plaid shirtdress was cute, but she could [not] wear it to school.
adverb
Her short plaid shirtdress was cute, but she could not [wear] it to school.
verb
Her short plaid shirtdress was cute, but she could not wear [it] to school.
direct object
Her short plaid shirtdress was cute, but she could not wear it [to school].
prepositional phrase: adverb
[Emily] posted another funny status update, but nobody commented on it.
subject
Emily [posted] another funny status update, but nobody commented on it.
verb
Emily posted [another] funny status update, but nobody commented on it.
adjective
Emily posted another [funny] status update, but nobody commented on it.
adjective
Emily posted another funny [status] update, but nobody commented on it.
adjective
Emily posted another funny status [update], but nobody commented on it.
direct object
Emily posted another funny status update, [but] nobody commented on it.
conjunction
Emily posted another funny status update, but [nobody] commented on it.
subject
Emily posted another funny status update, but nobody [commented] on it.
verb
Emily posted another funny status update, but nobody commented [on it].
prepositional phrase: adverb
[After last night's rehearsal], I tried to read your email, but my computer was misbehaving.
prepositional phrase: adverb
After last night's rehearsal, [I] tried to read your email, but my computer was misbehaving.
subject
After last night's rehearsal, I [tried] to read your email, but my computer was misbehaving.
verb
After last night's rehearsal, I tried [to read your email], but my computer was misbehaving.
infinitive phrase: direct object
After last night's rehearsal, I tried to read your email, [but] my computer was misbehaving.
conjunction
After last night's rehearsal, I tried to read your email, but [my] computer was misbehaving.
adjective
After last night's rehearsal, I tried to read your email, but my [computer] was misbehaving.
subject
After last night's rehearsal, I tried to read your email, but my computer [was] misbehaving.
linking verb
After last night's rehearsal, I tried to read your email, but my computer was [misbehaving].
verb
[Studying for the test] boosted my confidence, but I probably still missed half of the questions.
gerund phrase: subject
Studying [for the test] boosted my confidence, but I probably still missed half of the questions.
prepositional phrase: adverb
Studying for the test [boosted] my confidence, but I probably still missed half of the questions.
verb
Studying for the test boosted [my] confidence, but I probably still missed half of the questions.
adjective
Studying for the test boosted my [confidence], but I probably still missed half of the questions.
direct object
Studying for the test boosted my confidence, [but] I probably still missed half of the questions.
conjunction
Studying for the test boosted my confidence, but [I] probably still missed half of the questions.
subject
Studying for the test boosted my confidence, but I [probably] still missed half of the questions.
adverb
Studying for the test boosted my confidence, but I probably [still] missed half of the questions.
adverb
Studying for the test boosted my confidence, but I probably still [missed] half of the questions.
verb
Studying for the test boosted my confidence, but I probably still missed [half] of the questions.
direct object
Studying for the test boosted my confidence, but I probably still missed half [of the questions].
prepositional phrase: adjective
[His roof repaired] and his new carpeting installed, Boba Fett was ready for a vacation at his summer house, but Jabba the Hutt made him an irresistible offer.
absolute phrase
His roof repaired [and] his new carpeting installed, Boba Fett was ready for a vacation at his summer house, but Jabba the Hutt made him an irresistible offer.
conjunction
His roof repaired and [his new carpeting installed], Boba Fett was ready for a vacation at his summer house, but Jabba the Hutt made him an irresistible offer.
absolute phrase
His roof repaired and his new carpeting installed, [Boba Fett] was ready for a vacation at his summer house, but Jabba the Hutt made him an irresistible offer.
subject
His roof repaired and his new carpeting installed, Boba Fett [was] ready for a vacation at his summer house, but Jabba the Hutt made him an irresistible offer.
linking verb
His roof repaired and his new carpeting installed, Boba Fett was [ready] for a vacation at his summer house, but Jabba the Hutt made him an irresistible offer.
predicate adjective
His roof repaired and his new carpeting installed, Boba Fett was ready [for a vacation] at his summer house, but Jabba the Hutt made him an irresistible offer.
prepositional phrase: adverb
His roof repaired and his new carpeting installed, Boba Fett was ready for a vacation [at his summer house], but Jabba the Hutt made him an irresistible offer.
prepositional phrase: adjective
His roof repaired and his new carpeting installed, Boba Fett was ready for a vacation at his summer house, [but] Jabba the Hutt made him an irresistible offer.
conjunction
His roof repaired and his new carpeting installed, Boba Fett was ready for a vacation at his summer house, but [Jabba the Hutt] made him an irresistible offer.
subject
His roof repaired and his new carpeting installed, Boba Fett was ready for a vacation at his summer house, but Jabba the Hutt [made] him an irresistible offer.
verb
His roof repaired and his new carpeting installed, Boba Fett was ready for a vacation at his summer house, but Jabba the Hutt made [him] an irresistible offer.
indirect object
His roof repaired and his new carpeting installed, Boba Fett was ready for a vacation at his summer house, but Jabba the Hutt made him an [irresistible] offer.
adjective
His roof repaired and his new carpeting installed, Boba Fett was ready for a vacation at his summer house, but Jabba the Hutt made him an irresistible [offer].
direct object
[I] feel wonderful, for I have found my path in life!
subject
I [feel] wonderful, for I have found my path in life!
linking verb
I feel [wonderful], for I have found my path in life!
predicate adjective
I feel wonderful, [for] I have found my path in life!
conjunction
I feel wonderful, for [I] have found my path in life!
subject
I feel wonderful, for I [have] found my path in life!
helping verb
I feel wonderful, for I have [found] my path in life!
verb
I feel wonderful, for I have found [my] path in life!
adjective
I feel wonderful, for I have found my [path] in life!
direct object
I feel wonderful, for I have found my path [in life]!
prepositional phrase: adjective
[Molly] will succeed in her career, for she is exceptionally smart.
subject
Molly [will] succeed in her career, for she is exceptionally smart.
helping verb
Molly will [succeed] in her career, for she is exceptionally smart.
verb
Molly will succeed [in her career], for she is exceptionally smart.
prepositional phrase: adverb
Molly will succeed in her career, [for] she is exceptionally smart.
conjunction
Molly will succeed in her career, for [she] is exceptionally smart.
subject
Molly will succeed in her career, for she [is] exceptionally smart.
linking verb
Molly will succeed in her career, for she is [exceptionally] smart.
adverb
Molly will succeed in her career, for she is exceptionally [smart].
predicate adjective
[Those] turtles perched on that log are naughty, for they have eaten all of my lettuce.
adjective
Those [turtles] perched on that log are naughty, for they have eaten all of my lettuce.
subject
Those turtles [perched on that log] are naughty, for they have eaten all of my lettuce.
participial phrase: adjective
Those turtles perched [on that log] are naughty, for they have eaten all of my lettuce.
prepositional phrase: adverb
Those turtles perched on that log [are] naughty, for they have eaten all of my lettuce.
linking verb
Those turtles perched on that log are [naughty], for they have eaten all of my lettuce.
predicate adjective
Those turtles perched on that log are naughty, [for] they have eaten all of my lettuce.
conjunction
Those turtles perched on that log are naughty, for [they] have eaten all of my lettuce.
subject
Those turtles perched on that log are naughty, for they [have] eaten all of my lettuce.
helping verb
Those turtles perched on that log are naughty, for they have [eaten] all of my lettuce.
verb
Those turtles perched on that log are naughty, for they have eaten [all] of my lettuce.
direct object
Those turtles perched on that log are naughty, for they have eaten all [of my lettuce].
prepositional phrase: adverb
[Fifty] points are not enough, for I need seventy points to earn an A.
adjective
Fifty [points] are not enough, for I need seventy points to earn an A.
subject
Fifty points [are] not enough, for I need seventy points to earn an A.
linking verb
Fifty points are [not] enough, for I need seventy points to earn an A.
adverb
Fifty points are not [enough], for I need seventy points to earn an A.
predicate adjective
Fifty points are not enough, [for] I need seventy points to earn an A.
conjunction
Fifty points are not enough, for [I] need seventy points to earn an A.
subject
Fifty points are not enough, for I [need] seventy points to earn an A.
verb
Fifty points are not enough, for I need [seventy] points to earn an A.
adjective
Fifty points are not enough, for I need seventy [points] to earn an A.
direct object
Fifty points are not enough, for I need seventy points [to earn an A].
infinitive phrase: adverb
[Cheating] is not an option, for cheaters never win.
subject
Cheating [is] not an option, for cheaters never win.
linking verb
Cheating is [not] an option, for cheaters never win.
adverb
Cheating is not an [option], for cheaters never win.
predicate noun
Cheating is not an option, [for] cheaters never win.
conjunction
Cheating is not an option, for [cheaters] never win.
subject
Cheating is not an option, for cheaters [never] win.
adverb
Cheating is not an option, for cheaters never [win].
verb
The [first] house collapsed, so we built a new one.
adjective
The first [house] collapsed, so we built a new one.
subject
The first house [collapsed], so we built a new one.
verb
The first house collapsed, [so] we built a new one.
conjunction
The first house collapsed, so [we] built a new one.
subject
The first house collapsed, so we [built] a new one.
verb
The first house collapsed, so we built a [new] one.
adjective
The first house collapsed, so we built a new [one].
direct object
[Running long distances] will destroy your feet and knees, so buy a bike and learn to ride.
gerund phrase: subject
Running long distances [will] destroy your feet and knees, so buy a bike and learn to ride.
helping verb
Running long distances will [destroy] your feet and knees, so buy a bike and learn to ride.
verb
Running long distances will destroy [your] feet and knees, so buy a bike and learn to ride.
adjective
Running long distances will destroy your [feet] and knees, so buy a bike and learn to ride.
direct object
Running long distances will destroy your feet [and] knees, so buy a bike and learn to ride.
conjunction
Running long distances will destroy your feet and [knees], so buy a bike and learn to ride.
direct object
Running long distances will destroy your feet and knees, [so] buy a bike and learn to ride.
conjunction
Running long distances will destroy your feet and knees, so [buy] a bike and learn to ride.
verb
Running long distances will destroy your feet and knees, so buy a [bike] and learn to ride.
direct object
Running long distances will destroy your feet and knees, so buy a bike [and] learn to ride.
conjunction
Running long distances will destroy your feet and knees, so buy a bike and [learn] to ride.
verb
Running long distances will destroy your feet and knees, so buy a bike and learn [to ride].
infinitive phrase: direct object
[Emily], the prettiest girl at the party, laughed at my dancing, so I left early.
subject
Emily, [the prettiest girl at the party], laughed at my dancing, so I left early.
appositive phrase
Emily, the prettiest girl [at the party], laughed at my dancing, so I left early.
prepositional phrase: adjective
Emily, the prettiest girl at the party, [laughed] at my dancing, so I left early.
verb
Emily, the prettiest girl at the party, laughed [at my dancing], so I left early.
prepositional phrase: adverb
Emily, the prettiest girl at the party, laughed at my dancing, [so] I left early.
conjunction
Emily, the prettiest girl at the party, laughed at my dancing, so [I] left early.
subject
Emily, the prettiest girl at the party, laughed at my dancing, so I [left] early.
verb
Emily, the prettiest girl at the party, laughed at my dancing, so I left [early].
adverb
[Turning around], she spotted the stolen car speeding away, so she called the police.
participial phrase: adjective
Turning around, [she] spotted the stolen car speeding away, so she called the police.
subject
Turning around, she [spotted] the stolen car speeding away, so she called the police.
verb
Turning around, she spotted the [stolen] car speeding away, so she called the police.
adjective
Turning around, she spotted the stolen [car] speeding away, so she called the police.
direct object
Turning around, she spotted the stolen car [speeding away], so she called the police.
participial phrase: adjective
Turning around, she spotted the stolen car speeding away, [so] she called the police.
conjunction
Turning around, she spotted the stolen car speeding away, so [she] called the police.
subject
Turning around, she spotted the stolen car speeding away, so she [called] the police.
verb
Turning around, she spotted the stolen car speeding away, so she called the [police].
direct object
[To win the game], he needed to collect the most points, so he played carefully.
infinitive phrase: adverb
To win the game, [he] needed to collect the most points, so he played carefully.
subject
To win the game, he [needed] to collect the most points, so he played carefully.
verb
To win the game, he needed [to collect the most points], so he played carefully.
infinitive phrase: direct object
To win the game, he needed to collect the most points, [so] he played carefully.
conjunction
To win the game, he needed to collect the most points, so [he] played carefully.
subject
To win the game, he needed to collect the most points, so he [played] carefully.
verb
To win the game, he needed to collect the most points, so he played [carefully].
adverb
[Aidan] wanted to look cool, so he dressed as Anakin Skywalker.
subject
Aidan [wanted] to look cool, so he dressed as Anakin Skywalker.
verb
Aidan wanted [to look cool], so he dressed as Anakin Skywalker.
infinitive phrase: direct object
Aidan wanted to look cool, [so] he dressed as Anakin Skywalker.
conjunction
Aidan wanted to look cool, so [he] dressed as Anakin Skywalker.
subject
Aidan wanted to look cool, so he [dressed] as Anakin Skywalker.
verb
Aidan wanted to look cool, so he dressed [as Anakin Skywalker].
prepositional phrase: adverb
[Your] friend, the smart one from biology class, saved my life, so give her my thanks.
adjective
Your [friend], the smart one from biology class, saved my life, so give her my thanks.
subject
Your friend, [the smart one from biology class], saved my life, so give her my thanks.
appositive phrase
Your friend, the smart one [from biology class], saved my life, so give her my thanks.
prepositional phrase: adjective
Your friend, the smart one from biology class, [saved] my life, so give her my thanks.
verb
Your friend, the smart one from biology class, saved [my] life, so give her my thanks.
adjective
Your friend, the smart one from biology class, saved my [life], so give her my thanks.
direct object
Your friend, the smart one from biology class, saved my life, [so] give her my thanks.
conjunction
Your friend, the smart one from biology class, saved my life, so [give] her my thanks.
verb
Your friend, the smart one from biology class, saved my life, so give [her] my thanks.
adjective
Your friend, the smart one from biology class, saved my life, so give her [my] thanks.
adjective
Your friend, the smart one from biology class, saved my life, so give her my [thanks].
direct object
[My glasses broken], I could not see, so I may have hit your mailbox accidentally.
absolute phrase
My glasses broken, [I] could not see, so I may have hit your mailbox accidentally.
subject
My glasses broken, I [could] not see, so I may have hit your mailbox accidentally.
helping verb
My glasses broken, I could [not] see, so I may have hit your mailbox accidentally.
adverb
My glasses broken, I could not [see], so I may have hit your mailbox accidentally.
verb
My glasses broken, I could not see, [so] I may have hit your mailbox accidentally.
conjunction
My glasses broken, I could not see, so [I] may have hit your mailbox accidentally.
subject
My glasses broken, I could not see, so I [may] have hit your mailbox accidentally.
helping verb
My glasses broken, I could not see, so I may [have] hit your mailbox accidentally.
helping verb
My glasses broken, I could not see, so I may have [hit] your mailbox accidentally.
verb
My glasses broken, I could not see, so I may have hit [your] mailbox accidentally.
adjective
My glasses broken, I could not see, so I may have hit your [mailbox] accidentally.
direct object
My glasses broken, I could not see, so I may have hit your mailbox [accidentally].
adverb
The [race] starts early, so I need a full night's sleep.
subject
The race [starts] early, so I need a full night's sleep.
verb
The race starts [early], so I need a full night's sleep.
adverb
The race starts early, [so] I need a full night's sleep.
conjunction
The race starts early, so [I] need a full night's sleep.
subject
The race starts early, so I [need] a full night's sleep.
verb
The race starts early, so I need a [full] night's sleep.
adjective
The race starts early, so I need a full [night's] sleep.
adjective
The race starts early, so I need a full night's [sleep].
direct object
[Fyodor] always cheats, so you should not play with him.
subject
Fyodor [always] cheats, so you should not play with him.
adverb
Fyodor always [cheats], so you should not play with him.
verb
Fyodor always cheats, [so] you should not play with him.
conjunction
Fyodor always cheats, so [you] should not play with him.
subject
Fyodor always cheats, so you [should] not play with him.
helping verb
Fyodor always cheats, so you should [not] play with him.
adverb
Fyodor always cheats, so you should not [play] with him.
verb
Fyodor always cheats, so you should not play [with him].
prepositional phrase: adverb
The [dinner] tasted horrible, yet I wanted seconds.
subject
The dinner [tasted] horrible, yet I wanted seconds.
linking verb
The dinner tasted [horrible], yet I wanted seconds.
predicate adjective
The dinner tasted horrible, [yet] I wanted seconds.
conjunction
The dinner tasted horrible, yet [I] wanted seconds.
subject
The dinner tasted horrible, yet I [wanted] seconds.
verb
The dinner tasted horrible, yet I wanted [seconds].
direct object
[Felipe] never studies, yet he always earns the best grades.
subject
Felipe [never] studies, yet he always earns the best grades.
adverb
Felipe never [studies], yet he always earns the best grades.
verb
Felipe never studies, [yet] he always earns the best grades.
conjunction
Felipe never studies, yet [he] always earns the best grades.
subject
Felipe never studies, yet he [always] earns the best grades.
adverb
Felipe never studies, yet he always [earns] the best grades.
verb
Felipe never studies, yet he always earns the [best] grades.
adjective
Felipe never studies, yet he always earns the best [grades].
direct object
[Danielle] paid me a nice compliment, yet I still do not trust her.
subject
Danielle [paid] me a nice compliment, yet I still do not trust her.
verb
Danielle paid [me] a nice compliment, yet I still do not trust her.
indirect object
Danielle paid me a [nice] compliment, yet I still do not trust her.
adjective
Danielle paid me a nice [compliment], yet I still do not trust her.
direct object
Danielle paid me a nice compliment, [yet] I still do not trust her.
conjunction
Danielle paid me a nice compliment, yet [I] still do not trust her.
subject
Danielle paid me a nice compliment, yet I [still] do not trust her.
adverb
Danielle paid me a nice compliment, yet I still [do] not trust her.
helping verb
Danielle paid me a nice compliment, yet I still do [not] trust her.
adverb
Danielle paid me a nice compliment, yet I still do not [trust] her.
verb
Danielle paid me a nice compliment, yet I still do not trust [her].
direct object
[My] aide typed for several hours, yet she never finished the work.
adjective
My [aide] typed for several hours, yet she never finished the work.
subject
My aide [typed] for several hours, yet she never finished the work.
verb
My aide typed [for several hours], yet she never finished the work.
prepositional phrase: adverb
My aide typed for several hours, [yet] she never finished the work.
conjunction
My aide typed for several hours, yet [she] never finished the work.
subject
My aide typed for several hours, yet she [never] finished the work.
adverb
My aide typed for several hours, yet she never [finished] the work.
verb
My aide typed for several hours, yet she never finished the [work].
direct object
The [dream] gave Jordan an uneasy feeling about the stunt, yet he refused to disappoint his fans.
subject
The dream [gave] Jordan an uneasy feeling about the stunt, yet he refused to disappoint his fans.
verb
The dream gave [Jordan] an uneasy feeling about the stunt, yet he refused to disappoint his fans.
indirect object
The dream gave Jordan an [uneasy] feeling about the stunt, yet he refused to disappoint his fans.
adjective
The dream gave Jordan an uneasy [feeling] about the stunt, yet he refused to disappoint his fans.
direct object
The dream gave Jordan an uneasy feeling [about the stunt], yet he refused to disappoint his fans.
prepositional phrase: adjective
The dream gave Jordan an uneasy feeling about the stunt, [yet] he refused to disappoint his fans.
conjunction
The dream gave Jordan an uneasy feeling about the stunt, yet [he] refused to disappoint his fans.
subject
The dream gave Jordan an uneasy feeling about the stunt, yet he [refused] to disappoint his fans.
verb
The dream gave Jordan an uneasy feeling about the stunt, yet he refused [to disappoint his fans].
infinitive phrase: direct object
[Swimming in the middle of winter] was a bad idea, yet I still am happy about it.
gerund phrase: subject
Swimming [in the middle of winter] was a bad idea, yet I still am happy about it.
prepositional phrase: adverb
Swimming in the middle of winter [was] a bad idea, yet I still am happy about it.
linking verb
Swimming in the middle of winter was a [bad] idea, yet I still am happy about it.
adjective
Swimming in the middle of winter was a bad [idea], yet I still am happy about it.
predicate noun
Swimming in the middle of winter was a bad idea, [yet] I still am happy about it.
conjunction
Swimming in the middle of winter was a bad idea, yet [I] still am happy about it.
subject
Swimming in the middle of winter was a bad idea, yet I [still] am happy about it.
adverb
Swimming in the middle of winter was a bad idea, yet I still [am] happy about it.
linking verb
Swimming in the middle of winter was a bad idea, yet I still am [happy] about it.
predicate adjective
Swimming in the middle of winter was a bad idea, yet I still am happy [about it].
prepositional phrase: adverb
[He] could not reach her on the phone, nor could he find her at the house.
subject
He [could] not reach her on the phone, nor could he find her at the house.
helping verb
He could [not] reach her on the phone, nor could he find her at the house.
adverb
He could not [reach] her on the phone, nor could he find her at the house.
verb
He could not reach [her] on the phone, nor could he find her at the house.
direct object
He could not reach her [on the phone], nor could he find her at the house.
prepositional phrase: adverb
He could not reach her on the phone, [nor] could he find her at the house.
conjunction
He could not reach her on the phone, nor [could] he find her at the house.
helping verb
He could not reach her on the phone, nor could [he] find her at the house.
subject
He could not reach her on the phone, nor could he [find] her at the house.
verb
He could not reach her on the phone, nor could he find [her] at the house.
direct object
He could not reach her on the phone, nor could he find her [at the house].
prepositional phrase: adverb
[Shelley] never broke a promise, nor did she ever tell a lie.
subject
Shelley [never] broke a promise, nor did she ever tell a lie.
adverb
Shelley never [broke] a promise, nor did she ever tell a lie.
verb
Shelley never broke a [promise], nor did she ever tell a lie.
direct object
Shelley never broke a promise, [nor] did she ever tell a lie.
conjunction
Shelley never broke a promise, nor [did] she ever tell a lie.
helping verb
Shelley never broke a promise, nor did [she] ever tell a lie.
subject
Shelley never broke a promise, nor did she [ever] tell a lie.
adverb
Shelley never broke a promise, nor did she ever [tell] a lie.
verb
Shelley never broke a promise, nor did she ever tell a [lie].
direct object
[Learning to skydive] will not cure your fear of heights, nor will it make you more beautiful.
gerund phrase: subject
Learning [to skydive] will not cure your fear of heights, nor will it make you more beautiful.
infinitive phrase: object of a gerund
Learning to skydive [will] not cure your fear of heights, nor will it make you more beautiful.
helping verb
Learning to skydive will [not] cure your fear of heights, nor will it make you more beautiful.
adverb
Learning to skydive will not [cure] your fear of heights, nor will it make you more beautiful.
verb
Learning to skydive will not cure [your] fear of heights, nor will it make you more beautiful.
adjective
Learning to skydive will not cure your [fear] of heights, nor will it make you more beautiful.
direct object
Learning to skydive will not cure your fear [of heights], nor will it make you more beautiful.
prepositional phrase: adjective
Learning to skydive will not cure your fear of heights, [nor] will it make you more beautiful.
conjunction
Learning to skydive will not cure your fear of heights, nor [will] it make you more beautiful.
helping verb
Learning to skydive will not cure your fear of heights, nor will [it] make you more beautiful.
subject
Learning to skydive will not cure your fear of heights, nor will it [make] you more beautiful.
verb
Learning to skydive will not cure your fear of heights, nor will it make [you] more beautiful.
direct object
Learning to skydive will not cure your fear of heights, nor will it make you [more] beautiful.
adverb
Learning to skydive will not cure your fear of heights, nor will it make you more [beautiful].
object compliment: adjective
The [CEO] would not sell us her company's secrets, nor would she sell them to our competitor.
subject
The CEO [would] not sell us her company's secrets, nor would she sell them to our competitor.
helping verb
The CEO would [not] sell us her company's secrets, nor would she sell them to our competitor.
adverb
The CEO would not [sell] us her company's secrets, nor would she sell them to our competitor.
verb
The CEO would not sell [us] her company's secrets, nor would she sell them to our competitor.
indirect object
The CEO would not sell us [her] company's secrets, nor would she sell them to our competitor.
adjective
The CEO would not sell us her [company's] secrets, nor would she sell them to our competitor.
adjective
The CEO would not sell us her company's [secrets], nor would she sell them to our competitor.
direct object
The CEO would not sell us her company's secrets, [nor] would she sell them to our competitor.
conjunction
The CEO would not sell us her company's secrets, nor [would] she sell them to our competitor.
helping verb
The CEO would not sell us her company's secrets, nor would [she] sell them to our competitor.
subject
The CEO would not sell us her company's secrets, nor would she [sell] them to our competitor.
verb
The CEO would not sell us her company's secrets, nor would she sell [them] to our competitor.
direct object
The CEO would not sell us her company's secrets, nor would she sell them [to our competitor].
prepositional phrase: adverb
[I] graduated from high school in 1994; my class had 160 students in it.
subject
I [graduated] from high school in 1994; my class had 160 students in it.
verb
I graduated [from high school] in 1994; my class had 160 students in it.
prepositional phrase: adverb
I graduated from high school [in 1994]; my class had 160 students in it.
prepositional phrase: adverb
I graduated from high school in 1994; [my] class had 160 students in it.
adjective
I graduated from high school in 1994; my [class] had 160 students in it.
subject
I graduated from high school in 1994; my class [had] 160 students in it.
verb
I graduated from high school in 1994; my class had [160] students in it.
adjective
I graduated from high school in 1994; my class had 160 [students] in it.
direct object
I graduated from high school in 1994; my class had 160 students [in it].
prepositional phrase: adverb
The [children] had lost everything in the fire; we bought them new toys to calm their minds.
subject
The children [had] lost everything in the fire; we bought them new toys to calm their minds.
helping verb
The children had [lost] everything in the fire; we bought them new toys to calm their minds.
verb
The children had lost [everything] in the fire; we bought them new toys to calm their minds.
direct object
The children had lost everything [in the fire]; we bought them new toys to calm their minds.
prepositional phrase: adverb
The children had lost everything in the fire; [we] bought them new toys to calm their minds.
subject
The children had lost everything in the fire; we [bought] them new toys to calm their minds.
verb
The children had lost everything in the fire; we bought [them] new toys to calm their minds.
indirect object
The children had lost everything in the fire; we bought them [new] toys to calm their minds.
adjective
The children had lost everything in the fire; we bought them new [toys] to calm their minds.
direct object
The children had lost everything in the fire; we bought them new toys [to calm their minds].
infinitive phrase: adverb
[After the game], Tanya needed a ride; the battery in her car had died.
prepositional phrase: adverb
After the game, [Tanya] needed a ride; the battery in her car had died.
subject
After the game, Tanya [needed] a ride; the battery in her car had died.
verb
After the game, Tanya needed a [ride]; the battery in her car had died.
direct object
After the game, Tanya needed a ride; the [battery] in her car had died.
subject
After the game, Tanya needed a ride; the battery [in her car] had died.
prepositional phrase: adjective
After the game, Tanya needed a ride; the battery in her car [had] died.
helping verb
After the game, Tanya needed a ride; the battery in her car had [died].
verb
[Aunt Ginny], the oldest of my relatives, lives in Vermont; she still attends dances on Friday nights at the Rotary Club.
subject
Aunt Ginny, [the oldest of my relatives], lives in Vermont; she still attends dances on Friday nights at the Rotary Club.
appositive phrase
Aunt Ginny, the oldest [of my relatives], lives in Vermont; she still attends dances on Friday nights at the Rotary Club.
prepositional phrase: adjective
Aunt Ginny, the oldest of my relatives, [lives] in Vermont; she still attends dances on Friday nights at the Rotary Club.
verb
Aunt Ginny, the oldest of my relatives, lives [in Vermont]; she still attends dances on Friday nights at the Rotary Club.
prepositional phrase: adverb
Aunt Ginny, the oldest of my relatives, lives in Vermont; [she] still attends dances on Friday nights at the Rotary Club.
subject
Aunt Ginny, the oldest of my relatives, lives in Vermont; she [still] attends dances on Friday nights at the Rotary Club.
adverb
Aunt Ginny, the oldest of my relatives, lives in Vermont; she still [attends] dances on Friday nights at the Rotary Club.
verb
Aunt Ginny, the oldest of my relatives, lives in Vermont; she still attends [dances] on Friday nights at the Rotary Club.
direct object
Aunt Ginny, the oldest of my relatives, lives in Vermont; she still attends dances [on Friday nights] at the Rotary Club.
prepositional phrase: adverb
Aunt Ginny, the oldest of my relatives, lives in Vermont; she still attends dances on Friday nights [at the Rotary Club].
prepositional phrase: adjective
[Having never seen a duck], Rebecca was eager to walk around the pond; she wants one as a pet now.
participial phrase: adjective
Having never seen a duck, [Rebecca] was eager to walk around the pond; she wants one as a pet now.
subject
Having never seen a duck, Rebecca [was] eager to walk around the pond; she wants one as a pet now.
linking verb
Having never seen a duck, Rebecca was [eager] to walk around the pond; she wants one as a pet now.
predicate adjective
Having never seen a duck, Rebecca was excited [to walk around the pond]; she wants one as a pet now.
infinitive phrase: adverb
Having never seen a duck, Rebecca was eager to walk [around the pond]; she wants one as a pet now.
prepositional phrase: adverb
Having never seen a duck, Rebecca was eager to walk around the pond; [she] wants one as a pet now.
subject
Having never seen a duck, Rebecca was eager to walk around the pond; she [wants] one as a pet now.
verb
Having never seen a duck, Rebecca was eager to walk around the pond; she wants [one] as a pet now.
direct object
Having never seen a duck, Rebecca was eager to walk around the pond; she wants one [as a pet] now.
prepositional phrase: adjective
Having never seen a duck, Rebecca was eager to walk around the pond; she wants one as a pet [now].
adverb
[Learning to ride a bike] will not make you a better person; it will make you a happier person.
gerund phrase: subject
Learning [to ride a bike] will not make you a better person; it will make you a happier person.
infinitive phrase: object of a gerund
Learning to ride a bike [will] not make you a better person; it will make you a happier person.
helping verb
Learning to ride a bike will [not] make you a better person; it will make you a happier person.
adverb
Learning to ride a bike will not [make] you a better person; it will make you a happier person.
verb
Learning to ride a bike will not make [you] a better person; it will make you a happier person.
direct object
Learning to ride a bike will not make you a [better] person; it will make you a happier person.
adjective
Learning to ride a bike will not make you a better [person]; it will make you a happier person.
object complement: noun
Learning to ride a bike will not make you a better person; [it] will make you a happier person.
subject
Learning to ride a bike will not make you a better person; it [will] make you a happier person.
helping verb
Learning to ride a bike will not make you a better person; it will [make] you a happier person.
verb
Learning to ride a bike will not make you a better person; it will make [you] a happier person.
direct object
Learning to ride a bike will not make you a better person; it will make you a [happier] person.
adjective
Learning to ride a bike will not make you a better person; it will make you a happier [person].
object complement: noun
[To really solve the problem], we would have needed to work for several hours; to earn credit, we only needed to fill all the boxes with numbers.
infinitive phrase: adverb
To really solve the problem, [we] would have needed to work for several hours; to earn credit, we only needed to fill all the boxes with numbers.
subject
To really solve the problem, we [would] have needed to work for several hours; to earn credit, we only needed to fill all the boxes with numbers.
helping verb
To really solve the problem, we would [have] needed to work for several hours; to earn credit, we only needed to fill all the boxes with numbers.
helping verb
To really solve the problem, we would have [needed] to work for several hours; to earn credit, we only needed to fill all the boxes with numbers.
verb
To really solve the problem, we would have needed [to work for several hours]; to earn credit, we only needed to fill all the boxes with numbers.
infinitive phrase: direct object
To really solve the problem, we would have needed to work [for several hours]; to earn credit, we only needed to fill all the boxes with numbers.
prepositional phrase: adverb
To really solve the problem, we would have needed to work for several hours; [to earn credit], we only needed to fill all the boxes with numbers.
infinitive phrase: adverb
To really solve the problem, we would have needed to work for several hours; to earn credit, [we] only needed to fill all the boxes with numbers.
subject
To really solve the problem, we would have needed to work for several hours; to earn credit, we [only] needed to fill all the boxes with numbers.
adverb
To really solve the problem, we would have needed to work for several hours; to earn credit, we only [needed] to fill all the boxes with numbers.
verb
To really solve the problem, we would have needed to work for several hours; to earn credit, we only needed [to fill all the boxes with numbers].
infinitive phrase: direct object
To really solve the problem, we would have needed to work for several hours; to earn credit, we only needed to fill all the boxes [with numbers].
prepositional phrase: adverb
[Gray clouds hanging in the sky], we somberly left the stadium; our team had lost again.
absolute phrase
Gray clouds hanging [in the sky], we somberly left the stadium; our team had lost again.
prepositional phrase: adverb
Gray clouds hanging in the sky, [we] somberly left the stadium; our team had lost again.
subject
Gray clouds hanging in the sky, we [somberly] left the stadium; our team had lost again.
adverb
Gray clouds hanging in the sky, we somberly [left] the stadium; our team had lost again.
verb
Gray clouds hanging in the sky, we somberly left the [stadium]; our team had lost again.
direct object
Gray clouds hanging in the sky, we somberly left the stadium; [our] team had lost again.
adjective
Gray clouds hanging in the sky, we somberly left the stadium; our [team] had lost again.
subject
Gray clouds hanging in the sky, we somberly left the stadium; our team [had] lost again.
helping verb
Gray clouds hanging in the sky, we somberly left the stadium; our team had [lost] again.
verb
Gray clouds hanging in the sky, we somberly left the stadium; our team had lost [again].
adverb
[Aaron], Katie's oldest son, has been taking piano lessons for several years; he can play "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star," and most of "Mary had a Little Lamb."
subject
Aaron, [Katie's oldest son], has been taking piano lessons for several years; he can play "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star," and most of "Mary had a Little Lamb."
appositive phrase
Aaron, Katie's oldest son, [has] been taking piano lessons for several years; he can play "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star," and most of "Mary had a Little Lamb."
helping verb
Aaron, Katie's oldest son, has [been] taking piano lessons for several years; he can play "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star," and most of "Mary had a Little Lamb."
helping verb
Aaron, Katie's oldest son, has been [taking] piano lessons for several years; he can play "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star," and most of "Mary had a Little Lamb."
verb
Aaron, Katie's oldest son, has been taking [piano] lessons for several years; he can play "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star," and most of "Mary had a Little Lamb."
adjective
Aaron, Katie's oldest son, has been taking piano [lessons] for several years; he can play "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star," and most of "Mary had a Little Lamb."
direct object
Aaron, Katie's oldest son, has been taking piano lessons [for several years]; he can play "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star," and most of "Mary had a Little Lamb."
prepositional phrase: adverb
Aaron, Katie's oldest son, has been taking piano lessons for several years; [he] can play "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star," and most of "Mary had a Little Lamb."
subject
Aaron, Katie's oldest son, has been taking piano lessons for several years; he [can] play "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star," and most of "Mary had a Little Lamb."
helping verb
Aaron, Katie's oldest son, has been taking piano lessons for several years; he can [play] "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star," and most of "Mary had a Little Lamb."
verb
Aaron, Katie's oldest son, has been taking piano lessons for several years; he can play ["Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star,"] and most of "Mary had a Little Lamb."
direct object
Aaron, Katie's oldest son, has been taking piano lessons for several years; he can play "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star," [and] most of "Mary had a Little Lamb."
conjunction
Aaron, Katie's oldest son, has been taking piano lessons for several years; he can play "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star," and [most] of "Mary had a Little Lamb."
direct object
Aaron, Katie's oldest son, has been taking piano lessons for several years; he can play "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star," and most [of "Mary had a Little Lamb."]
prepositional phrase: adjective
The [pigeons] nesting in the rafters above our patio are driving me insane; they poop on everything.
subject
The pigeons [nesting in the rafters above our patio] are driving me insane; they poop on everything.
participial phrase: adjective
The pigeons nesting [in the rafters] above our patio are driving me insane; they poop on everything.
prepositional phrase: adverb
The pigeons nesting in the rafters [above our patio] are driving me insane; they poop on everything.
prepositional phrase: adjective
The pigeons nesting in the rafters above our patio [are] driving me insane; they poop on everything.
helping verb
The pigeons nesting in the rafters above our patio are [driving] me insane; they poop on everything.
verb
The pigeons nesting in the rafters above our patio are driving [me] insane; they poop on everything.
direct object
The pigeons nesting in the rafters above our patio are driving me [insane]; they poop on everything.
object complement: adjective
The pigeons nesting in the rafters above our patio are driving me insane; [they] poop on everything.
subject
The pigeons nesting in the rafters above our patio are driving me insane; they [poop] on everything.
verb
The pigeons nesting in the rafters above our patio are driving me insane; they poop [on everything].
prepositional phrase: adverb
[Artoo] is smart and brave; Threepio is a coward but also a good sport.
subject
Artoo [is] smart and brave; Threepio is a coward but also a good sport.
linking verb
Artoo is [smart] and brave; Threepio is a coward but also a good sport.
predicate adjective
Artoo is smart [and] brave; Threepio is a coward but also a good sport.
conjunction
Artoo is smart and [brave]; Threepio is a coward but also a good sport.
predicate adjective
Artoo is smart and brave; [Threepio] is a coward but also a good sport.
subject
Artoo is smart and brave; Threepio [is] a coward but also a good sport.
linking verb
Artoo is smart and brave; Threepio is a [coward] but also a good sport.
predicate noun
Artoo is smart and brave; Threepio is a coward [but] also a good sport.
conjunction
Artoo is smart and brave; Threepio is a coward but [also] a good sport.
adverb
Artoo is smart and brave; Threepio is a coward but also a [good] sport.
adjective
Artoo is smart and brave; Threepio is a coward but also a good [sport].
predicate noun
[She] wore a striped cardigan sweater and a pair of skinny indigo jeans; he wore his ripped pajamas with a stained t-shirt.
subject
She [wore] a striped cardigan sweater and a pair of skinny indigo jeans; he wore his ripped pajamas with a stained t-shirt.
verb
She wore a [striped] cardigan sweater and a pair of skinny indigo jeans; he wore his ripped pajamas with a stained t-shirt.
adjective
She wore a striped [cardigan] sweater and a pair of skinny indigo jeans; he wore his ripped pajamas with a stained t-shirt.
adjective
She wore a striped cardigan [sweater] and a pair of skinny indigo jeans; he wore his ripped pajamas with a stained t-shirt.
direct object
She wore a striped cardigan sweater [and] a pair of skinny indigo jeans; he wore his ripped pajamas with a stained t-shirt.
conjunction
She wore a striped cardigan sweater and a [pair] of skinny indigo jeans; he wore his ripped pajamas with a stained t-shirt.
direct object
She wore a striped cardigan sweater and a pair [of skinny indigo jeans]; he wore his ripped pajamas with a stained t-shirt.
prepositional phrase: adjective
She wore a striped cardigan sweater and a pair of skinny indigo jeans; [he] wore his ripped pajamas with a stained t-shirt.
subject
She wore a striped cardigan sweater and a pair of skinny indigo jeans; he [wore] his ripped pajamas with a stained t-shirt.
verb
She wore a striped cardigan sweater and a pair of skinny indigo jeans; he wore [his] ripped pajamas with a stained t-shirt.
adjective
She wore a striped cardigan sweater and a pair of skinny indigo jeans; he wore his [ripped] pajamas with a stained t-shirt.
adjective
She wore a striped cardigan sweater and a pair of skinny indigo jeans; he wore his ripped [pajamas] with a stained t-shirt.
direct object
She wore a striped cardigan sweater and a pair of skinny indigo jeans; he wore his ripped pajamas [with a stained t-shirt].
prepositional phrase: adverb
The [Santa Catalinas], the mountains to the north of Tucson, are the largest mountains in the area; the Tucson Mountains are much smaller.
subject
The Santa Catalinas, [the mountains to the north of Tucson], are the largest mountains in the area; the Tucson Mountains are much smaller.
appositive phrase
The Santa Catalinas, the mountains [to the north] of Tucson, are the largest mountains in the area; the Tucson Mountains are much smaller.
prepositional phrase: adjective
The Santa Catalinas, the mountains to the north [of Tucson], are the largest mountains in the area; the Tucson Mountains are much smaller.
prepositional phrase: adjective
The Santa Catalinas, the mountains to the north of Tucson, [are] the largest mountains in the area; the Tucson Mountains are much smaller.
linking verb
The Santa Catalinas, the mountains to the north of Tucson, are the [largest] mountains in the area; the Tucson Mountains are much smaller.
adjective
The Santa Catalinas, the mountains to the north of Tucson, are the largest [mountains] in the area; the Tucson Mountains are much smaller.
predicate noun
The Santa Catalinas, the mountains to the north of Tucson, are the largest mountains [in the area]; the Tucson Mountains are much smaller.
prepositional phrase: adjective
The Santa Catalinas, the mountains to the north of Tucson, are the largest mountains in the area; the [Tucson Mountains] are much smaller.
subject
The Santa Catalinas, the mountains to the north of Tucson, are the largest mountains in the area; the Tucson Mountains [are] much smaller.
linking verb
The Santa Catalinas, the mountains to the north of Tucson, are the largest mountains in the area; the Tucson Mountains are [much] smaller.
adverb
The Santa Catalinas, the mountains to the north of Tucson, are the largest mountains in the area; the Tucson Mountains are much [smaller].
predicate adjective
[Emily] finished all of her homework; therefore, she will be able to go to the movies.
subject
Emily [finished] all of her homework; therefore, she will be able to go to the movies.
verb
Emily finished [all] of her homework; therefore, she will be able to go to the movies.
direct object
Emily finished all [of her homework]; therefore, she will be able to go to the movies.
prepositional phrase: adjective
Emily finished all of her homework; [therefore], she will be able to go to the movies.
conjunctive adverb
Emily finished all of her homework; therefore, [she] will be able to go to the movies.
subject
Emily finished all of her homework; therefore, she [will] be able to go to the movies.
helping verb
Emily finished all of her homework; therefore, she will [be] able to go to the movies.
linking verb
Emily finished all of her homework; therefore, she will be [able] to go to the movies.
predicate adjective
Emily finished all of her homework; therefore, she will be able [to go to the movies].
infinitive phrase: adverb
Emily finished all of her homework; therefore, she will be able to go [to the movies].
prepositional phrase: adverb
[Jeremy] really wants to buy a new bike; therefore, he is saving all of his allowance money.
subject
Jeremy [really] wants to buy a new bike; therefore, he is saving all of his allowance money.
adverb
Jeremy really [wants] to buy a new bike; therefore, he is saving all of his allowance money.
verb
Jeremy really wants [to buy a new bike]; therefore, he is saving all of his allowance money.
infinitive phrase: direct object
Jeremy really wants to buy a new bike; [therefore], he is saving all of his allowance money.
conjunctive adverb
Jeremy really wants to buy a new bike; therefore, [he] is saving all of his allowance money.
subject
Jeremy really wants to buy a new bike; therefore, he [is] saving all of his allowance money.
helping verb
Jeremy really wants to buy a new bike; therefore, he is [saving] all of his allowance money.
verb
Jeremy really wants to buy a new bike; therefore, he is saving [all] of his allowance money.
direct object
Jeremy really wants to buy a new bike; therefore, he is saving all [of his allowance money].
prepositional phrase: adjective
[Having been dumped by his girlfriend], Rob needs a date for the prom; therefore, he is combing his hair regularly and trying to be a good listener.
participial phrase: adjective
Having been dumped [by his girlfriend], Rob needs a date for the prom; therefore, he is combing his hair regularly and trying to be a good listener.
prepositional phrase: adverb
Having been dumped by his girlfriend, [Rob] needs a date for the prom; therefore, he is combing his hair regularly and trying to be a good listener.
subject
Having been dumped by his girlfriend, Rob [needs] a date for the prom; therefore, he is combing his hair regularly and trying to be a good listener.
verb
Having been dumped by his girlfriend, Rob needs a [date] for the prom; therefore, he is combing his hair regularly and trying to be a good listener.
direct object
Having been dumped by his girlfriend, Rob needs a date [for the prom]; therefore, he is combing his hair regularly and trying to be a good listener.
prepositional phrase: adjective
Having been dumped by his girlfriend, Rob needs a date for the prom; [therefore], he is combing his hair regularly and trying to be a good listener.
conjunctive adverb
Having been dumped by his girlfriend, Rob needs a date for the prom; therefore, [he] is combing his hair regularly and trying to be a good listener.
subject
Having been dumped by his girlfriend, Rob needs a date for the prom; therefore, he [is] combing his hair regularly and trying to be a good listener.
helping verb
Having been dumped by his girlfriend, Rob needs a date for the prom; therefore, he is [combing] his hair regularly and trying to be a good listener.
verb
Having been dumped by his girlfriend, Rob needs a date for the prom; therefore, he is combing [his] hair regularly and trying to be a good listener.
adjective
Having been dumped by his girlfriend, Rob needs a date for the prom; therefore, he is combing his [hair] regularly and trying to be a good listener.
direct object
Having been dumped by his girlfriend, Rob needs a date for the prom; therefore, he is combing his hair [regularly] and trying to be a good listener.
adverb
Having been dumped by his girlfriend, Rob needs a date for the prom; therefore, he is combing his hair regularly [and] trying to be a good listener.
conjunction
Having been dumped by his girlfriend, Rob needs a date for the prom; therefore, he is combing his hair regularly and [trying] to be a good listener.
verb
Having been dumped by his girlfriend, Rob needs a date for the prom; therefore, he is combing his hair regularly and trying [to be a good listener].
infinitive phrase: direct object
[Malia] finally found the coupon; however, it had expired already.
subject
Malia [finally] found the coupon; however, it had expired already.
adverb
Malia finally [found] the coupon; however, it had expired already.
verb
Malia finally found the [coupon]; however, it had expired already.
direct object
Malia finally found the coupon; [however], it had expired already.
conjunctive adverb
Malia finally found the coupon; however, [it] had expired already.
subject
Malia finally found the coupon; however, it [had] expired already.
helping verb
Malia finally found the coupon; however, it had [expired] already.
verb
Malia finally found the coupon; however, it had expired [already].
adverb
[Frederick] likes apples; however, his older brother prefers pears.
subject
Frederick [likes] apples; however, his older brother prefers pears.
verb
Frederick likes [apples]; however, his older brother prefers pears.
direct object
Frederick likes apples; [however], his older brother prefers pears.
conjunctive adverb
Frederick likes apples; however, [his] older brother prefers pears.
adjective
Frederick likes apples; however, his [older] brother prefers pears.
adjective
Frederick likes apples; however, his older [brother] prefers pears.
subject
Frederick likes apples; however, his older brother [prefers] pears.
verb
Frederick likes apples; however, his older brother prefers [pears].
direct object
[Seeing the saguaros capped with snow] gave me a great idea for a Christmas card; however, I have no artistic talent.
gerund phrase: subject
Seeing the saguaros [capped with snow] gave me a great idea for a Christmas card; however, I have no artistic talent.
participial phrases: adjective
Seeing the saguaros capped [with snow] gave me a great idea for a Christmas card; however, I have no artistic talent.
prepositional phrase: adverb
Seeing the saguaros capped with snow [gave] me a great idea for a Christmas card; however, I have no artistic talent.
verb
Seeing the saguaros capped with snow gave [me] a great idea for a Christmas card; however, I have no artistic talent.
indirect object
Seeing the saguaros capped with snow gave me a [great] idea for a Christmas card; however, I have no artistic talent.
adjective
Seeing the saguaros capped with snow gave me a great [idea] for a Christmas card; however, I have no artistic talent.
direct object
Seeing the saguaros capped with snow gave me a great idea [for a Christmas card]; however, I have no artistic talent.
prepositional phrase: adjective
Seeing the saguaros capped with snow gave me a great idea for a Christmas card; [however], I have no artistic talent.
conjunctive adverb
Seeing the saguaros capped with snow gave me a great idea for a Christmas card; however, [I] have no artistic talent.
subject
Seeing the saguaros capped with snow gave me a great idea for a Christmas card; however, I [have] no artistic talent.
verb
Seeing the saguaros capped with snow gave me a great idea for a Christmas card; however, I have [no] artistic talent.
adjective
Seeing the saguaros capped with snow gave me a great idea for a Christmas card; however, I have no [artistic] talent.
adjective
Seeing the saguaros capped with snow gave me a great idea for a Christmas card; however, I have no artistic [talent].
direct object
[Frustrated with her English teacher's jokes], Amy whispered, "sectumsempra"; however, nothing happened.
participial phrase: adjective
Frustrated [with her English teacher's jokes], Amy whispered, "sectumsempra"; however, nothing happened.
prepositional phrase: adverb
Frustrated with her English teacher's jokes, [Amy] whispered, "sectumsempra"; however, nothing happened.
subject
Frustrated with her English teacher's jokes, Amy [whispered], "sectumsempra"; however, nothing happened.
verb
Frustrated with her English teacher's jokes, Amy whispered, "[sectumsempra]"; however, nothing happened.
direct object
Frustrated with her English teacher's jokes, Amy whispered, "sectumsempra"; [however], nothing happened.
conjunctive adverb
Frustrated with her English teacher's jokes, Amy whispered, "sectumsempra"; however, [nothing] happened.
subject
Frustrated with her English teacher's jokes, Amy whispered, "sectumsempra"; however, nothing [happened].
verb
[Maggie] completely forgot about the assignment until late last night; nevertheless, she completed the whole thing by this morning.
subject
Maggie [completely] forgot about the assignment until late last night; nevertheless, she completed the whole thing by this morning.
adverb
Maggie completely [forgot] about the assignment until late last night; nevertheless, she completed the whole thing by this morning.
verb
Maggie completely forgot [about the assignment] until late last night; nevertheless, she completed the whole thing by this morning.
prepositional phrase: adverb
Maggie completely forgot about the assignment [until late last night]; nevertheless, she completed the whole thing by this morning.
prepositional phrase: adverb
Maggie completely forgot about the assignment until late last night; [nevertheless], she completed the whole thing by this morning.
conjunctive adverb
Maggie completely forgot about the assignment until late last night; nevertheless, [she] completed the whole thing by this morning.
subject
Maggie completely forgot about the assignment until late last night; nevertheless, she [completed] the whole thing by this morning.
verb
Maggie completely forgot about the assignment until late last night; nevertheless, she completed the [whole] thing by this morning.
adjective
Maggie completely forgot about the assignment until late last night; nevertheless, she completed the whole [thing] by this morning.
direct object
Maggie completely forgot about the assignment until late last night; nevertheless, she completed the whole thing [by this morning].
prepositional phrase: adverb
[He] looks scared; nevertheless, he is ready.
subject
He [looks] scared; nevertheless, he is ready.
linking verb
He looks [scared]; nevertheless, he is ready.
predicate adjective
He looks scared; [nevertheless], he is ready.
conjunctive adverb
He looks scared; nevertheless, [he] is ready.
subject
He looks scared; nevertheless, he [is] ready.
linking verb
He looks scared; nevertheless, he is [ready].
predicate adjective
[You] have cheated on every test; consequently, you are not receiving credit for this class.
subject
You [have] cheated on every test; consequently, you are not receiving credit for this class.
linking verb
You have [cheated] on every test; consequently, you are not receiving credit for this class.
verb
You have cheated [on every test]; consequently, you are not receiving credit for this class.
prepositional phrase: adverb
You have cheated on every test; [consequently], you are not receiving credit for this class.
conjunctive adverb
You have cheated on every test; consequently, [you] are not receiving credit for this class.
subject
You have cheated on every test; consequently, you [are] not receiving credit for this class.
helping verb
You have cheated on every test; consequently, you are [not] receiving credit for this class.
adverb
You have cheated on every test; consequently, you are not [receiving] credit for this class.
verb
You have cheated on every test; consequently, you are not receiving [credit] for this class.
direct object
You have cheated on every test; consequently, you are not receiving credit [for this class].
prepositional phrase: adjective
[Being pressured by the defense], he recklessly threw the ball; consequently, Jayron intercepted it and returned it for a touchdown.
participial phrase: adjective
Being pressured [by the defense], he recklessly threw the ball; consequently, Jayron intercepted it and returned it for a touchdown.
prepositional phrase: adverb
Being pressured by the defense, [he] recklessly threw the ball; consequently, Jayron intercepted it and returned it for a touchdown.
subject
Being pressured by the defense, he [recklessly] threw the ball; consequently, Jayron intercepted it and returned it for a touchdown.
adverb
Being pressured by the defense, he recklessly [threw] the ball; consequently, Jayron intercepted it and returned it for a touchdown.
verb
Being pressured by the defense, he recklessly threw the [ball]; consequently, Jayron intercepted it and returned it for a touchdown.
direct object
Being pressured by the defense, he recklessly threw the ball; [consequently], Jayron intercepted it and returned it for a touchdown.
conjunctive adverb
Being pressured by the defense, he recklessly threw the ball; consequently, [Jayron] intercepted it and returned it for a touchdown.
subject
Being pressured by the defense, he recklessly threw the ball; consequently, Jayron [intercepted] it and returned it for a touchdown.
verb
Being pressured by the defense, he recklessly threw the ball; consequently, Jayron intercepted [it] and returned it for a touchdown.
direct object
Being pressured by the defense, he recklessly threw the ball; consequently, Jayron intercepted it [and] returned it for a touchdown.
conjunction
Being pressured by the defense, he recklessly threw the ball; consequently, Jayron intercepted it and [returned] it for a touchdown.
verb
Being pressured by the defense, he recklessly threw the ball; consequently, Jayron intercepted it and returned [it] for a touchdown.
direct object
Being pressured by the defense, he recklessly threw the ball; consequently, Jayron intercepted it and returned it [for a touchdown].
prepositional phrase: adverb.
[Joseph] should make me breakfast; moreover, he should clear the table and wash the dishes afterward.
subject
Joseph [should] make me breakfast; moreover, he should clear the table and wash the dishes afterward.
helping verb
Joseph should [make] me breakfast; moreover, he should clear the table and wash the dishes afterward.
verb
Joseph should make [me] breakfast; moreover, he should clear the table and wash the dishes afterward.
indirect object
Joseph should make me [breakfast]; moreover, he should clear the table and wash the dishes afterward.
direct object
Joseph should make me breakfast; [moreover], he should clear the table and wash the dishes afterward.
conjunctive adverb
Joseph should make me breakfast; moreover, [he] should clear the table and wash the dishes afterward.
subject
Joseph should make me breakfast; moreover, he [should] clear the table and wash the dishes afterward.
helping verb
Joseph should make me breakfast; moreover, he should [clear] the table and wash the dishes afterward.
verb
Joseph should make me breakfast; moreover, he should clear the [table] and wash the dishes afterward.
direct object
Joseph should make me breakfast; moreover, he should clear the table [and] wash the dishes afterward.
conjunction
Joseph should make me breakfast; moreover, he should clear the table and [wash] the dishes afterward.
verb
Joseph should make me breakfast; moreover, he should clear the table and wash the [dishes] afterward.
direct object
Joseph should make me breakfast; moreover, he should clear the table and wash the dishes [afterward].
adverb
[Facebook] has caused Ashley several problems at work; moreover, it has destroyed her marriage.
subject
Facebook [has] caused Ashley several problems at work; moreover, it has destroyed her marriage.
helping verb
Facebook has [caused] Ashley several problems at work; moreover, it has destroyed her marriage.
verb
Facebook has caused [Ashley] several problems at work; moreover, it has destroyed her marriage.
indirect object
Facebook has caused Ashley [several] problems at work; moreover, it has destroyed her marriage.
adjective
Facebook has caused Ashley several [problems] at work; moreover, it has destroyed her marriage.
direct object
Facebook has caused Ashley several problems [at work]; moreover, it has destroyed her marriage.
prepositional phrase: adjective
Facebook has caused Ashley several problems at work; [moreover], it has destroyed her marriage.
conjunctive adverb
Facebook has caused Ashley several problems at work; moreover, [it] has destroyed her marriage.
subject
Facebook has caused Ashley several problems at work; moreover, it [has] destroyed her marriage.
helping verb
Facebook has caused Ashley several problems at work; moreover, it has [destroyed] her marriage.
verb
Facebook has caused Ashley several problems at work; moreover, it has destroyed [her] marriage.
adjective
Facebook has caused Ashley several problems at work; moreover, it has destroyed her [marriage].
direct object
[Jessica] should bring us the recipe before Friday; otherwise, we will need to buy something at the store.
subject
Jessica [should] bring us the recipe before Friday; otherwise, we will need to buy something at the store.
helping verb
Jessica should [bring] us the recipe before Friday; otherwise, we will need to buy something at the store.
verb
Jessica should bring [us] the recipe before Friday; otherwise, we will need to buy something at the store.
indirect object
Jessica should bring us the [recipe] before Friday; otherwise, we will need to buy something at the store.
direct object
Jessica should bring us the recipe [before Friday]; otherwise, we will need to buy something at the store.
prepositional phrase: adverb
Jessica should bring us the recipe before Friday; [otherwise], we will need to buy something at the store.
conjunctive adverb
Jessica should bring us the recipe before Friday; otherwise, [we] will need to buy something at the store.
subject
Jessica should bring us the recipe before Friday; otherwise, we [will] need to buy something at the store.
helping verb
Jessica should bring us the recipe before Friday; otherwise, we will [need] to buy something at the store.
verb
Jessica should bring us the recipe before Friday; otherwise, we will need [to buy something] at the store.
infinitive phrase: direct object
Jessica should bring us the recipe before Friday; otherwise, we will need to buy something [at the store].
prepositional phrase: adverb
The [show] ran long; otherwise, I would have been early.
subject
The show [ran] long; otherwise, I would have been early.
verb
The show ran [long]; otherwise, I would have been early.
adverb
The show ran long; [otherwise], I would have been early.
conjunctive adverb
The show ran long; otherwise, [I] would have been early.
subject
The show ran long; otherwise, I [would] have been early.
helping verb
The show ran long; otherwise, I would [have] been early.
helping verb
The show ran long; otherwise, I would have [been] early.
linking verb
The show ran long; otherwise, I would have been [early].
predicate adjective
The [sheep] sleeping in the barn have a right to use the good hay; besides, the cows never use it.
subject
The sheep [sleeping in the barn] have a right to use the good hay; besides, the cows never use it.
participial phrase: adjective
The sheep sleeping [in the barn] have a right to use the good hay; besides, the cows never use it.
prepositional phrase: adverb
The sheep sleeping in the barn [have] a right to use the good hay; besides, the cows never use it.
verb
The sheep sleeping in the barn have a [right] to use the good hay; besides, the cows never use it.
direct object
The sheep sleeping in the barn have a right [to use the good hay]; besides, the cows never use it.
infinitive phrase: adjective
The sheep sleeping in the barn have a right to use the good hay; [besides], the cows never use it.
conjunctive adverb
The sheep sleeping in the barn have a right to use the good hay; besides, the [cows] never use it.
subject
The sheep sleeping in the barn have a right to use the good hay; besides, the cows [never] use it.
adverb
The sheep sleeping in the barn have a right to use the good hay; besides, the cows never [use] it.
verb
The sheep sleeping in the barn have a right to use the good hay; besides, the cows never use [it].
direct object
[Because of the rules violation], the team is ineligible for the playoffs; furthermore, the board is opening an investigation into other possible infractions.
prepositional phrase: adverb
Because of the rules violation, the [team] is ineligible for the playoffs; furthermore, the board is opening an investigation into other possible infractions.
subject
Because of the rules violation, the team [is] ineligible for the playoffs; furthermore, the board is opening an investigation into other possible infractions.
linking verb
Because of the rules violation, the team is [ineligible] for the playoffs; furthermore, the board is opening an investigation into other possible infractions.
predicate adjective
Because of the rules violation, the team is ineligible [for the playoffs]; furthermore, the board is opening an investigation into other possible infractions.
prepositional phrase: adverb
Because of the rules violation, the team is ineligible for the playoffs; [furthermore], the board is opening an investigation into other possible infractions.
conjunctive adverb
Because of the rules violation, the team is ineligible for the playoffs; furthermore, the [board] is opening an investigation into other possible infractions.
subject
Because of the rules violation, the team is ineligible for the playoffs; furthermore, the board [is] opening an investigation into other possible infractions.
helping verb
Because of the rules violation, the team is ineligible for the playoffs; furthermore, the board is [opening] an investigation into other possible infractions.
verb
Because of the rules violation, the team is ineligible for the playoffs; furthermore, the board is opening an [investigation] into other possible infractions.
direct object
Because of the rules violation, the team is ineligible for the playoffs; furthermore, the board is opening an investigation [into other possible infractions].
prepositional phrase: adjective
[Jonah] saved the cat from the burning building; accordingly, the mayor recognized him with a large and heavy plaque.
subject
Jonah [saved] the cat from the burning building; accordingly, the mayor recognized him with a large and heavy plaque.
verb
Jonah saved the [cat] from the burning building; accordingly, the mayor recognized him with a large and heavy plaque.
direct object
Jonah saved the cat [from the burning building]; accordingly, the mayor recognized him with a large and heavy plaque.
prepositional phrase: adverb
Jonah saved the cat from the burning building; [accordingly], the mayor recognized him with a large and heavy plaque.
conjunctive adverb
Jonah saved the cat from the burning building; accordingly, the [mayor] recognized him with a large and heavy plaque.
subject
Jonah saved the cat from the burning building; accordingly, the mayor [recognized] him with a large and heavy plaque.
verb
Jonah saved the cat from the burning building; accordingly, the mayor recognized [him] with a large and heavy plaque.
direct object
Jonah saved the cat from the burning building; accordingly, the mayor recognized him [with a large and heavy plaque].
prepositional phrase: adverb
[She] learned every song in the book; in fact, she could play all of them from memory.
subject
She [learned] every song in the book; in fact, she could play all of them from memory.
verb
She learned [every] song in the book; in fact, she could play all of them from memory.
adjective
She learned every [song] in the book; in fact, she could play all of them from memory.
direct object
She learned every song [in the book]; in fact, she could play all of them from memory.
prepositional phrase: adjective
She learned every song in the book; [in fact], she could play all of them from memory.
conjunctive adverb
She learned every song in the book; in fact, [she] could play all of them from memory.
subject
She learned every song in the book; in fact, she [could] play all of them from memory.
helping verb
She learned every song in the book; in fact, she could [play] all of them from memory.
verb
She learned every song in the book; in fact, she could play [all] of them from memory.
direct object
She learned every song in the book; in fact, she could play all [of them] from memory.
prepositional phrase: adjective
She learned every song in the book; in fact, she could play all of them [from memory].
prepositional phrase: adverb
[Samantha] cooked an enormous turkey; in addition, Bella and Margaret brought six pounds of fresh cranberry sauce.
subject
Samantha [cooked] an enormous turkey; in addition, Bella and Margaret brought six pounds of fresh cranberry sauce.
verb
Samantha cooked an [enormous] turkey; in addition, Bella and Margaret brought six pounds of fresh cranberry sauce.
adjective
Samantha cooked an enormous [turkey]; in addition, Bella and Margaret brought six pounds of fresh cranberry sauce.
direct object
Samantha cooked an enormous turkey; [in addition], Bella and Margaret brought six pounds of fresh cranberry sauce.
conjunctive adverb
Samantha cooked an enormous turkey; in addition, [Bella] and Margaret brought six pounds of fresh cranberry sauce.
subject
Samantha cooked an enormous turkey; in addition, Bella [and] Margaret brought six pounds of fresh cranberry sauce.
conjunction
Samantha cooked an enormous turkey; in addition, Bella and [Margaret] brought six pounds of fresh cranberry sauce.
subject
Samantha cooked an enormous turkey; in addition, Bella and Margaret [brought] six pounds of fresh cranberry sauce.
verb
Samantha cooked an enormous turkey; in addition, Bella and Margaret brought [six] pounds of fresh cranberry sauce.
adjective
Samantha cooked an enormous turkey; in addition, Bella and Margaret brought six [pounds] of fresh cranberry sauce.
direct object
Samantha cooked an enormous turkey; in addition, Bella and Margaret brought six pounds [of fresh cranberry sauce].
prepositional phrase: adjective
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Term:
Definition:
Definition:

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