eaws growler Flashcards

Aviation terminology
Terms Definitions
101.1 Navy Occupational Safety and Health (NAVOSH) programs: Respiratory Protection Program
A program, which identifies employees as requiring respirator protection equipment due to the nature of their work or job. Applies to any worker subject to areas or tasks known to require respirators. Medical screening and individual fit testing is required for each worker
101.1 Navy Occupational Safety and Health (NAVOSH) programs: Hearing Conservation Program
A program, which surveys and identifies potentially hazardous noise levels and personnel at risk. Program goal is to prevent hearing loss and ensure auditory fitness for duty.
101.1 Navy Occupational Safety and Health (NAVOSH) programs: Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
A program, which assesses all workplaces to, determined if hazards are present that necessitate the use of Personal Protective Equipment.
101.2 Identify the F/A-18E/F danger areas.

Flammable liquids, compressed gasses
areas including hydraulic reservoirs, fuel tanks, nitrogen charge struts, high-pressure accumulators
101.2 Identify the F/A-18E/F danger areas.

Canopy, seat and DFIRS explosive devices
many explosive devices are located throughout the airframe which have rocket motors, initiators and thrusters also controls that require special handling.
101.2 Identify the F/A-18E/F danger areas.

Airframe and external stores
- external fuel tanks, vertical ejection racks missiles launchers and conventional /nuclear weapons loaded on the wing or fuselage centerline pylons may be ejected.
101.2 Identify the F/A-18E/F danger areas.

Engine
danger areas resulting from engine operation are related to exhaust velocity and temperature, air intakes and high noise levels.
101.2 Identify the F/A-18E/F danger areas.

Radar antenna
operation of the radar makes this a radiation hazard to personnel.
101.2 Identify the F/A-18E/F danger areas.

APU exhaust
extreme caution should be used during aircraft start up this hazard area presents a high temperature danger.
101.2 Identify the F/A-18E/F danger areas.

Arresting Hook
extreme caution should be used due to inherent dangers of accumulated pressure.
101.2 Identify the F/A-18E/F danger areas.

All moving flight control surfaces
flaps, stabilizers, ailerons, rudders and wing fold
101.3 Identify the minimum safe distances from aircraft intakes/exhaust

Idle
9 feet radius intake
115-155 feet from the exhaust
101.3 Identify the minimum safe distances from aircraft intakes/exhaust

Military
25 feet radius from intake
325-725 feet from exhaust
101.3 Identify the minimum safe distances from aircraft intakes/exhaust

Maximum
25 feet radius from intake
850-925 feet from exhaust
101.4 Purpose and Location of the aircraft STEP, NO STEP Areas
No Step Areas on the Aircraft are places that are easily damaged by weight.
Areas to avoid are your flaps, stabilizers, ailerons, Radome surfaces and other areas labeled No Step.
101.5 Safety precautions when applying and removing external power
Circuit breakers and switches must be position as specified in the required IETMS
101.6 Identify the danger areas during Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) operations.
The Exhaust velocity of the APU reaches 142 MPH
The Exhaust temperature reaches 328-350 degrees Fahrenheit
101.7 Precautions/Restrictions that Apply to Ordnance Loaded Aircraft
Major maintenance on aircraft is prohibited.

Minor maintenance and routine servicing may be conducted ONLY after all weapons have been safetied
101.8 Precautions when Using Graphite or Carbon/Epoxy Composite Materials.
Wear respirators and goggles when exposed to these materials
Wear close weave cotton gloves when handling these materials.
102.2 State the proper procedures for aircraft grounding
To ensure proper grounding:

Connect grounding cable snugly to approved ground receptacle

Next, connect other end to one of nine grounding points on the aircraft
102.3 State the purpose of aircraft plugs and covers.
Protect aircraft openings from FOD intrusion
Protect protruding surfaces from physical and environmental damage
102.4 Requirements, duties, & responsibilities of Aircraft Handling Team personnel

Move Director
Prime responsibility lies with the director for the aircraft movement
Ensures a qualified brake rider mans cockpit
Ensures tow bar is secure prior to movement
Ensures aircraft is ready for the move
Ensures enough clearance all around the aircraft before/during move
Ensures aircraft has enough brake pressure
Sets the pace to a slow walking speed
102.4 Requirements, duties, & responsibilities of Aircraft Handling Team personnel

Brake Rider
Conducts a pre-movement inspection of aircraft
Ensures aircraft has all safety equipment installed
(Seat Pins / landing gear safety pins)
Ensures aircraft is free from servicing equipment / external cords
Ensures aircraft has enough brake pressure
(Minimum 2900 PSI)
Stays alert during entire aircraft move
Does not leave the cockpit until aircraft is final spotted
102.4 Requirements, duties, & responsibilities of Aircraft Handling Team personnel

Chock Walker
Pulls and installs chocks when instructed by the director
Stays alert to director's signals
Ensures aircraft is ready for move
(Free of any chains, power cords, and servicing equipment)
Watches out for ground obstacles and warns the director accordingly
Stay in a relatively safe position from aircraft wheels
102.4 Requirements, duties, & responsibilities of Aircraft Handling Team personnel

Safety Observer (Wing-Walker/Tail-Walker)
Conduct's a pre-tow inspection of the aircraft
Ensures safety pins are installed
Ensures aircraft is ready for move
Ensures aircraft is free of chains, cable cords, & SE
Ensures aircraft will clear all obstructions during move
102.4 Requirements, duties, & responsibilities of Aircraft Handling Team personne

Tractor Driver
Tows aircraft at a slow walking speed avoiding sudden stops or starts
Pre-OP's tractor ensuring the SE is up and ready
Follows instructions from the director
Avoid any and all obstructions
102.5 Discuss towing preparations
a. Minimum structural access doors must be installed to prevent damage to aircraft
b. Radome must be closed and secured (if installed).
c. Do not tow a/c with doors 68 L/R open. (engine bay doors).
d. Ensure aircraft emergency brake accumulator pressure gauge reads 2900-psi minimum.
e. Ensure aircraft is clear of all obstacles and support equipment.
102.6 State the purpose of the landing gear aircraft ground safety pins
Landing gear safety pins lock nose and main landing gear in the down position, preventing gear retraction.
 
102.7 Describe the hazard associated with canopy static buildup
During flight a high voltage static electrical charge of up to 100,000 volts may build up and be stored in the canopy

This is a hazard to touch unless it is discharged using a static charge removal kit  
102.8 Briefly discuss the canopy static discharge process
Make sure a/c is properly grounded
Ensure static charge removal kit has had a continuity check within the last 30 days
Connect kit to aircraft nose landing gear wheel well ground receptacle
d. Run the kit mittens over the canopy and windshield until static discharge is gone
* Note - A crackling / popping noise indicates a static charge exist while running mittens over.
103.1 State the purpose of a hydraulic patch test.
The purpose is to check the level of contamination of the aircraft hydraulic systems or support equipment hydraulic system.
The maximum level of contamination for aircraft is class 5 and class 3 for support equipment.
103.2 State the purpose of a tactical paint scheme.
The tactical paint scheme is applied to an aircraft to lessen the probability of visual or photographic detection.

It is also used for deception, reduction of detection range and to confuse and mislead observers.
103.3 State the purpose of the following publications and their application

NAVAIR 01-1A-509
Provides information on material & procedures for the prevention & repair of corrosion.
Provides information on the upkeep of the aircraft paint scheme.
Supervisory and maintenance personnel shall use this manual as a guide for all corrosion control and maintenance efforts.
103.3 State the purpose of the following publications and their application

IETM
NAVAIR A1-F18EF-IETM
103.5 Discuss the purpose of composite airframe materials
New materials are used in aircraft to limit weight, decrease effects of corrosion and increase strength.
103.6 Discuss the following repair terms

Temporary Repair
A repair that will allow aircraft to be flown until permanent repair can be made.

Temporary repairs are as simple and practical as possible.
103.6 Discuss the following repair terms

One-time flight
A repair made to restore limited load carrying requirements that will allow an aircraft to be flown to a repair station for permanent repairs.
103.6 Discuss the following repair terms

Permanent repair
A repair that equals or exceeds strength of original structure or component with no adverse affects on structural integrity, fatigue, life, safety, or flying characteristics
104.1 State the type and model of engine used in the EA-18G
F414-GE-400

A low by-pass axial flow turbo fan engine of modular construction
With Afterburner
104.1 State the type and model of engine used in the EA-18G

ENGINE SECTIONS
Afterburner Fuel System
Armament Gas Ingestion System Fan
Basic Engine
Engine Anti-Icing System
Engine Instrument System
Fan Speed Lockup System
Ignition System
Lubrication System
Main Fuel System
Variable Exhaust Nozzle (VEN) System
Variable Geometry System
104.2 State the three modes of operation for the Auxiliary Power Unit (APU)
Main Engine Start (MES)
Ground Maintenance Mode (GMM)
Gives the aircraft hydraulic and electrical power with the engine decoupled from the AMAD.
Environmental Control System (ECS)
Uses air supplied by the APU to run ECS Systems and components
104.3 State the purpose & location of the In-Flight Refueling (IFR) probe
Located on the right forward part of fuselage
Allows aircraft to take fuel from a tanker
Electrically controlled by a switch in the cockpit
Hydraulically operated
104.4 Explain the purpose of the Aircraft Fuel Storage system
The fuel system contains and supplies on board fuel to the aircraft engines, auxiliary power unit
Provides cooling for certain hydraulic and lubrication systems.
Fuel is stored in
four internal fuselage tanks, two internal wing tanks & up to five external fuel tanks.
Internal Fuel Load 14,600 LBS.
Each additional drop tank adds 3200 LBS +/- 100 LBS (480 gallons).
104.5 State the purpose of the foam-lined wing tanks.
The wing tanks have sealed channels and suppression foam blocks inside the wings, to prevent an explosive atmosphere in case of battle damage/accidental damage or rupture.
State the difference between a Barometric and Radar altimeter

Barometric Altimeter
Gives aircraft altitude by sensing the difference in air pressure as the aircraft changes altitude
Altitude information is adjusted to local barometric altitude - Mean Sea Level (MSL) 29.92
Used above 5000ft and over water
State the difference between a Barometric and Radar altimeter

Radar Altimeter
Altitude is measured by bouncing a signal off the earth and receiving the same signal back.
The greater the time required the higher the aircraft’s relative altitude.
The maximum altitude displayed is 5000 feet Above Ground Level (AGL)
105.2 Define the following terms

Azimuth
Angular measurement that is measured clockwise in degrees on a horizontal plane.
105.2 Define the following terms:

Bearing
The position or direction of one point with respect to another or to the compass
105.2 Define the following terms:

Range
Distance to a target or station.
105.2 Define the following terms:

Heading
The Direction that you are pointing
105.2 Define the following terms:

True Heading
The Direction that you are pointing with reference to true north
105.2 Define the following terms:

Magnetic direction
The Direction that you are pointing measured in degrees with reference to magnetic north
105.2 Define the following terms:

Relative direction
Uses the current direction that an object is facing as the 0/360-azimuth alignment
106.1 State the objective of the Explosive Qualification and Certification Program
To ensure military and civilian personnel are qualified / certified in the safe handling, stowage and transportation of ordnance in which they are associated
106.2 State the purpose of suspension/accessory equipment
To suspend, release, arm single stores, bombs, and a variety of missile launchers
106.3 State the purpose of an impulse cartridge (Cartridge Actuated Devices (CADS)
To eject single stores and a variety of weapons from the aircraft
106.4 Define the following acronyms:

AIM
Air-Launched Intercept-Aerial Guided Missile. (Air Intercept Missile)
106.4 Define the following acronyms:

AGM
Air-Launched Surface-Attack Guided Missile. (Air to Ground Missile)
106.4 Define the following acronyms:

CATM
Captive Air Training Missile
106.4 Define the following acronyms:

HERO
Hazards of Electromagnetic Radiation to Ordnance
106.5 Describe the application of the following types of bombs:

Retarded
Slows the weapon down before it gets to the target in order to allow the jet to get away from bomb

Used for low level bombing missions
106.5 Describe the application of the following types of bombs:

Non-Retarded
No means to slow bomb down.

Used in high level bombing missions where the pilot and aircraft are safe from bomb detonation
106.6 Explain the significance of the following color-coding on weapons:

Yellow
High explosive.
Identified by striping around the circumference of the weapon and/or warhead section
106.6 Explain the significance of the following color-coding on weapons:

Brown
Live rocket motor.
Identified by striping around the motor section of the weapon
106.6 Explain the significance of the following color-coding on weapons:

BLUE
Training
No Rocket Motor
106.7 Define the following types of weapon-guided systems:

Active
Homing signal is generated, sent and received by the missile.
106.7 Define the following types of weapon-guided systems:

Semi-active
Homing signal is generated, sent and received by the missile.
106.7 Define the following types of weapon-guided systems:

Passive
Homing signal is generated and sent by a source external to the missile, not including the target.
106.8 Successfully describe the purpose of chaff and flares as countermeasure devices

Chaff
Very fine pieces of metal that are expelled into the airway.
Used for radar guided missiles.
Degrades launching missiles target lock.
106.8 Successfully describe the purpose of chaff and flares as countermeasure devices

Flares
Used for heat seeking infrared missiles
106.9 Describe the hazards associated with forward firing ordnance
Do not stand forward or behind forward firing ordnance
Do not climb under underneath any suspended equipment
106.10 Describe the type of bomb rack used on the EA-18G
BRU-32
Used to suspend single stores/weapons using a 14 or 30 inch suspension.
106.11 Describe the location and purpose of the ICM safety switch.
Door 6 Port Side
Extended prevents dispensing of countermeasure.
Flush allows dispensing of countermeasures.
107.1 Identify the minimum requirements for aircrew Personnel Protective Equipment
1) Flight suit
2) Aircrew fliers boots
3) Anti-g garment
4) Helmet
5) Survival radio/beacon
6) Aviator flight gloves
7) Anti-exposure suit
8) Identification tags
(dog tags)
9) Pocket Knife
10) Personal survival kit
11) Signal device
12) Flashlight
13) Life preserver
14) Laser eye protection
107.2 State the purpose of the Environmental Control System (ECS)
Provides Avionics Cooling

Provides Aircrew Comfort
(i.e.. Pressurization/Temperature Control)
Has 12 Subsystems
107.2 State the purpose of the Environmental Control System (ECS) has 12
1) Bleed air control
2) Bleed air leak detection
3) Air cycle conditioning
4) Cabin cooling and defog
5) Avionics cooling
6) Cabin pressurization
7) Anti-g
8) On-board oxygen generating system (OBOGS)
9) Windshield anti-ice and rain removal
10) Radar Liquid cooling
11) Canopy seal
12) Wave guide pressurization
107.3 State the purpose of the following personal flight equipment:

The MBU-16/P or MBU-23/P Mask
Designed for use with a regulator, which provides breathing gas (100% oxygen or oxygen diluted with air) upon demand at a pressure schedule dependent on the altitude.
The mask provides facial protection from projectiles and fire as well as being qualified for depths of 16ft under water.
107.3 State the purpose of the following personal flight equipment

The CRU-103/P Oxygen regulator
A chest mounted, positive pressure, g-modulated regulator that provides on demand oxygen flow to the aircrew member
107.3 State the purpose of the following personal flight equipment:

The LPU-36/P Life Preserver
A Low Profile Floatation Collar (LPFC) is equipped with the FLU-8B/P automatic/manual inflation assembly.
The LPU-36/P is authorized for use only by aircrew personnel operating aircraft equipped with ejection seat systems.
107.3 State the purpose of the following personal flight equipment:

Anti-G garments
Consist of a bladder system encased in fire-resistant cloth outer shell.
As G-forces increase the bladders inflate automatically to apply pressure on the body to restrict the flow of blood downward to the aircrew members waist and feet to lessen the effects of blackout.
107.4 State the objective of the Egress Systems Checkout Certification Program.
1) To thoroughly familiarize personnel working in or around the cockpit with the ejection Systems / Any special hazards associated with those systems, and to routinely monitor all such qualified personnel.

2) All maintenance personnel must qualify upon arrival to command / prior to working on a/c.

3) All qualified personnel must re-qualify every 6 months.

4) TAD personnel must re-qualify after being away from command for 90 days
107.5 State the purpose of the ejection seats
Provides a place for the aircrew to sit

Emergency egress during flight
107.6 Define the following conditions:

Hypoxia (blackout)
The higher the altitude the amount of oxygen per unit of volume of air decreases, there for the oxygen intake is reduced unless the individual breathes additional oxygen
The eyes, body, and muscles will fail.
107.6 Define the following conditions:

Anoxia:
Death caused by complete lack of oxygen.
107.7 Identify the two types of Aviator's Breathing Oxygen (ABO)
a. Gaseous oxygen (type I)
MIL-0-27210D
b. Liquid oxygen
N/A
107.8 State the purpose of the Dry Bay Fire Suppression System (DBFSS)
The Dry Bay Fire Suppression System suppresses fire events associated with ballistic damage to the aircraft before a significant fire occurs. This system performs without pilot action.
DBFSS consists of 14 optical fire detectors, 6 dry bay extinguishers and a fire suppression control alarm.
107.9 State the purpose of the Parachute Harness Sensing Release Unit (PHSRU)
The Parachute Harness Sensing Release Unit
(PHSRU) is a sea water activated release system that
provides a backup automatic mode of separating the
parachute from the aircrew.
107.10 Describe the A/A24A-56 Helmet Unit, Intergrated, Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System (JHMCS)
The A/A24A--56 Helmet Unit, Integrated (Joint
Helmet Mounted Cueing System) is a display system
used to display cueing symbology for navigation,
weapons and sensors at high off boresight
angles.
107.11 State the purpose of the Helmet Mounted Display Unit (HDU)
Is part of JHMCS
The (HDU) has a built in hinge pivot that allows symbology to be displayed and fold clear of the visor assembly when the visor is retracted.
108.1 Define and explain the following acronyms:

SEAD (SUPPRESSION OF ENEMY AIR DEFENSES)
SEAD’s function is to neutralize, destroy, or temporarily degrade the enemy air defenses.
The role of SEAD is essentially to force the enemy to “run for cover” rather than shoot a missile during the specific time that our Strike aircraft will be flying into the SAM threat rings.
108.1 Define and explain the following acronyms:

WAS (WAR AT SEA)
The objective in this mission is to destroy the enemy’s naval vessels and amphibious force.
108.1 Define and explain the following acronyms:

CAS (CLOSE AIR SUPPORT)
The mission in the CAS arena is to precisely deliver various munitions at a set time.
The forward air controller (FAC) is the person responsible for passing certain key pieces of information to the CAS aircraft.
Things like target description, location of friendly forces, time-on-target (TOT), and suspected air threat in the area must all are passed.
108.1 Define and explain the following acronyms:

ACM (AIR COMBAT MANEUVERING)
Often characterized as “Dog Fighting”, ACM involves two or more opposing aircraft attempting to maneuver their aircraft to a weapons solution while in this visual arena.
108.1 Define and explain the following acronyms:

FCF (FUNCTIONAL CHECK FLIGHT)
Required to determine whether the airframe, power plant, accessories, and equipment are functioning per predetermined standards
Usually following a maintenance action or extended no-fly period.
108.1 Define and explain the following acronyms:

FCLP (FIELD CARRIER LANDING PRACTICE)
A form of training that is used to simulate landing on the aircraft carrier performed just prior to deploying aboard the ship.
108.2 Define and explain the following acronyms:

VMC (VISUAL METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS)
Meteorological conditions expressed in terms of visibility, cloud distance, and ceiling that are equal to or better than specified minimums.
The basic weather requirements for VMC are a 1000 ft. ceiling and 3 mile visibility (1000/3).
108.2 Define and explain the following acronyms:

IMC (INSTRUMENT METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS)
Meteorological conditions expressed in terms of visibility, distance from clouds and ceiling less than the minimum specified for visual meteorological conditions.
If the weather is less than 1000/3 then IMC exists.
108.2 Define and explain the following acronyms:

VFR (VISUAL FLIGHT RULES)
If VMC exists then pilots have the option of operating their aircraft with in a set of rules known as visual flight rules.
Essentially, when the weather is good (i.e. better than 1000/3) we can operate VFR.
These Visual Flight Rules are spelled out in the Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR).
108.2 Define and explain the following acronyms:

IFR (INSTRUMENT FLIGHT RULES)
If IMC exists then pilots are required to operate with adherence to Instrument Flight Rules (IFR).
Operating IFR requires the pilots to file a flight plan with the local air traffic control facility.
Aircraft operating IFR are under the positive control of some ATC agency.
108.3 Discuss the purpose of the Carrier Air Traffic Control Center (CATCC)
This is the centralized agency responsible for the status keeping of all carrier air operations and the control of all airborne aircraft under the operation officer’s cognizance except those being controlled by the CDC and the air officer
Comprised of two independent work centers
Air Ops and
Carrier Controlled Approach (CAA).
108.4 Describe the following:

Fresnel Lens Optical Landing System (FLOS)
The FLOS or “meatball” is an optical system on board the carrier that aids pilots in landing aboard the ship.
108.4 Describe the following:

Manually Operated Visual Landing System (MOVLAS)
MOVLAS is an emergency system that is supposed to be used when the primary optical landing system is rendered inoperative.
201 Airframes Systems
201.1.1 Aircraft Structure

Radome
Provides an electrically transparent window for transmission and reception of radar signals. Covers the radar.
201 Airframes Systems
201.1.1 Aircraft Structure

Forward Fuselage
From the end of the Nose Radome to the aft edge of panel 18. It includes the windshield, canopy, cockpit, leading edge extension, and nose landing gear.
201 Airframes Systems
201.1.1 Aircraft Structure

Center Fuselage
From the forward edge of panel 26 to the aft edge of panel 55L/R. Includes main landing gear, intake ducts, external stores stations, fuselage fuel tanks and airframe mounted accessory drive.
201 Airframes Systems
201.1.1 Aircraft Structure

Aft Fuselage
From panel 62L/R to the exhaust nozzles. It includes the engines, speed brake, vertical stabilizers, horizontal stabilators, and arresting hook.
201 Airframes Systems
201.1.1 Aircraft Structure

Wing
Provides lift for the aircraft, stores fuel, houses LEF's, TEF's and Ailerons, outboard section folds for carrier operation, allows for attachment of non jettison able pylons for weapons/fuel stores.
201 Airframes Systems
201.1.1 Aircraft Structure

Leading Edge Extension (LEX)
Provides added lift at high angles of attack. Mounted on either side of the Forward Fuselage they are an extension of the wing leading edge.
201 Airframes Systems
201.1.2 Flight Control Surfaces


Ailerons
In flight, the ailerons are commanded asymmetrically to produce roll motion, during takeoff and landing (with flaps switch set to half or full) they deflect symmetrically with the trailing edge flaps up to 45 degrees, trailing edge flap down to change lift. The ailerons are located on the outboard trailing edge of each wing.
201 Airframes Systems
201.1.2 Flight Control Surfaces


Leading Edge Flaps
When taking off or landing the leading edge flaps deflect symmetrically to change lift. In flight they deflect asymmetrically to aid the ailerons in producing roll motion. The leading edge flaps are located on the inboard and outboard leading edge of each wing.
201 Airframes Systems
201.1.2 Flight Control Surfaces

Trailing Edge Flaps
When taking off or landing the leading edge flaps deflect symmetrically to change lift. In flight they independently deflect asymmetrically to aid the ailerons in producing roll motion. The trailing edge flaps are located on the trailing edge of each wing.
201 Airframes Systems
201.1.2 Flight Control Surfaces

Stabilators
The stabilators deflect symmetrically to produce pitch motion and asymmetrically to produce roll motion. The stabilators are located on either side of the tail of the aircraft. Also provide pitch compensation during selection of the lex spoilers.
201 Airframes Systems
201.1.2 Flight Control Surfaces


Speed brake function LEX Spoiler
Operated deployment is enabled only during auto flap up operation. Provides, a speed brake at speeds less than MACH 1.5 and a high nose down pitch movement when transitioning from a high AOA.
201 Airframes Systems
201.1.3 Hydraulics Systems

Hydraulic System 1
Provides hydraulic fluid pressure to the primary flight controls either as a primary or backup source. System contains pump manifold, pump reservoir, filter unit, case drain filter, oil fuel heat exchange, and related indicator.
201 Airframes Systems
201.1.3 Hydraulics Systems

Hydraulic System 2
Same as System 1. Provides hydraulic fluid pressure to the primary flight controls either as a primary or backup source. The system also supplies pressure to all other non-flight control systems.
201 Airframes Systems
201.1.3 Hydraulics Systems

Auxiliary Power Unit Accumulator
Gas Charge cylinder provides required fluid pressure to the APU start motor and emergency hydraulic systems.
201 Airframes Systems
201.1.3 Hydraulics Systems

Switching Valves
Each switching valve allows backup hydraulic pressure to replace the primary hydraulic pressure, if the primary hydraulic pressure fails. If primary hydraulic is restored, the switching valve shifts to normal operating position.
201 Airframes Systems
201.1.4 Landing Gear

Nose Landing Gear
Nose landing gear strut assembly provides landing, takeoff and taxi energy absorption, and tire/runway compliance. Located on the underside of the Forward Fuselage. Dual chamber design provides a smooth long strike during landing and catapult operations.
201 Airframes Systems
201.1.4 Landing Gear

Main Landing Gear
A lever design with a shock absorber. Provides a stable platform for aircraft carrier and shore-based operations. Also absorbs the energy from ground loads during landing and taxi operations. Located on the underside of the Center Fuselage.
201 Airframes Systems
201.1.4 Landing Gear

Wheel Brakes
Provides pilot modulated individual wheel-controlled braking. An anti skid system is combined with the normal system to prevent wheel skid. Located on the main landing gear wheels.
201 Airframes Systems
201.1.4 Landing Gear

Launch Bar
Provides a means of steering the aircraft during carrier deck tracking and engages the catapult, applying catapult tow forces to the aircraft. Located on the forward side of the nose landing gear shock strut.
201 Airframes Systems
201.1.4 Landing Gear

Arresting Hook
A hydraulically controlled arm attached to the underside of the aft fuselage. A hook point is attached to the end of the arm. When the arresting hook is lowered for carrier landing, the hook point engages an arrestment cable on the carrier deck to stop the aircraft. Also provides a means of stopping the aircraft where normal runway landings are not available. Located on the underside of the aft fuselage.
201 Airframes Systems
201.1.5 Environmental Control Systems

Bleed Air System
Engine bleed air is extracted from the last compressor stage of both engines, regulated and routed to the air cycle air conditioning system.
201.1.5 Environmental Control Systems

Air Cycle Air Conditioning System
Cools and conditions hot bleed air for use in various aircraft systems, such as fuel pressurization, canopy seal, anti-g, throttle boost, anti ice, rain removal, avionics and cabin cooling.
201.1.5 Environmental Control Systems

Anti-Gravity System
Automatically regulates the air to the pilot's anti-g suit to increase pilot tolerance to high acceleration levels.
201.1.5 Environmental Control Systems

Oxygen System
Gaseous oxygen is supplied in an emergency situation only through the seat pan oxygen bottle.
201.1.5 Environmental Control Systems

On-Board Oxygen Generating System
Removes nitrogen and other contaminants from engine bleed air. The resultant product gas is an oxygen rich breathing mixture for pilots use.
201.1.6 Egress Systems

Ejection Seat System
Provides support for the crewmember during normal flight conditions and a method of escape from the aircraft during emergency conditions. System is made up of main beam, parachute, seat bucket, survival kit, and catapult.
201.1.6 Egress Systems

Canopy System
Main components are electro-mechanical canopy actuator, canopy unlatch thruster, canopy jettison motors. Provides entry to the cockpit and protects the crewmember from the elements. May be operated electrically or manually and can be jettisoned
in an emergency.
201.1.6 Egress Systems

Emergency Oxygen System
Oxygen is required at altitudes over 10,000 feet and for entire night flights. The emergency oxygen bottle, located in the ejection seat survival kit, is actuated automatically upon ejection or manually in the case of an oxygen system failure. Actuation is performed by pulling a green ring on the left hand side of the seat pan assembly
201.1.7 Fire Systems

Fire Detection System
A double loop system that provides warnings for the APU bay, left and right AMAD bays, and aft engine bays. A single loop system is used for the left and right forward engine bays. A fire condition in either engine or AMAD is indicated by left or right fire warning light, a fire condition in the APU bay is indicated by APU fire warning light, a voice alert is transmitted to the headset during fire conditions.
201.2.1 Electronic Flight Control System
The Electronic flight control system is made up of two flight control computers, control surface servo actuators, air data and inertial sensors and control sensors. The system also includes a built-in test to provide failure warning and fault isolation. The flight control computers combine inputs with air data and inertial inputs and provide electrical signals to servo actuators. The servo actuators move control surfaces the direction and amount required to produce desired aircraft motion.
201.2.3 Emergency Extension of the Landing Gear
Emergency extension is primarily free fall aided by stored energy in the MLG shock absorber and hydraulic system no. 2B pressure. Hydraulic system no. 2B pressure is supplied by the Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) and emergency brake accumulators and serves to unlock the landing gear up lock mechanisms and aid in landing gear down lock. Emergency extension is controlled by the LDG GEAR control.
201.5.1 What are the precautions associated with:

Ejection Seats
Main Firing Handle Safety Pin: Safeties the ejection control handle during all ground parking, servicing and towing. It is inserted through the hole in the base of the ejection control handle. Ejection Seat Safe/Armed Handle: Safeties the ejection control handle, preventing accidental seat ejection. In the safe position it is rotated full up and forward to the locked “SAFE” position
201.5.1 What are the precautions associated with:

Canopy Jettison System
Canopy Jettison Ground Safety Pin: Safeties the internal CANOPY JETT lever, preventing accidental canopy jettison by movement of internal CANOPY JETT lever. The pin must penetrate internal CANOPY JETT lever mounting plate and initiator lever to prevent accidental canopy jettison.
201.5.1 What are the precautions associated with:

Canopy Normal System
Open door 9 set and hold external canopy control switch to the open position until canopy is fully opened and release. If an electrical or mechanical failure occurs when the canopy is open, do not close canopy manually, unless weather conditions exists that require it.
Caution: Do not open canopy in wind excess of 60 knots.
Warning: “To prevent death or injury from electrical shock, make sure windshield and canopy static charge is discharged.”
201.5.1 What are the precautions associated with:

Gaseous Oxygen
Comply with safety directives.
Safe distance for smoking, opens flames, or sparks in an oxygen handling area is 50 feet.
202.1.1. Secondary power systems

Auxiliary Power Unit (APU)
To provide pneumatic air for motoring over/starting an engine or to drive an AMAD in GMM, can also be used for ground check out of the ECS. Located in door 52.
202.1.1. Secondary power systems

Airframe Mounted Accessory Drive (AMAD)
The airframe mounted accessory drives are two identical interchangeable gearboxes. Each is mechanically connected to an engine by a power transmission shaft (PTS). The AMAD is pneumatically connected to the APU through the air turbine starter (ATS). The AMAD transmits power to the engine for starts. Power to drive the AMAD accessories is provided by the engine during normal operations or by the APU during ground maintenance operations. Located inside door 53L and 53R.
202.1.1. Secondary power systems

Secondary Power Compressed Air
Provides pneumatic power for operating the air turbine starter or the environmental control system, provided by the APU or engine bleed air. An air connection is located in the right well wheel and allows use of an external air source for system operation (huffer starts).
202.1.2 Power Plant and related systems

Engine
F414-GE-400 is a low by-pass axial flow turbo fan engine of modular construction with afterburner
202.1.2 Power Plant and related systems

Ignition
Alternator, electrical control unit, ignition exciter, main igniter and after burner igniter. Remains on until engine reaches 45% or throttle is moved to off, A/B ignition comes on when A/B is selected and remains on until light off is detected
202.1.2 Power Plant and related systems

Lubrication
Self contained oil system to clean, cool, filter and pressurize. MIL-L-23699
202.1.2 Power Plant and related systems

Main fuel
Use of a Motive Flow Boost Pump, Nozzle Actuator fuel pump, Engine Fuel Pump and Integrated Engine Fuel Control to filter, pressurize and supply fuel for all main fuel combustion operations at all throttle settings
202.1.2 Power Plant and related systems

Afterburner fuel
Use of a Motive Flow Boost Pump, Nozzle Actuator fuel pump, Engine Fuel Pump and Integrated Engine Fuel Control to filter, pressurize and supply fuel for Afterburner operations whenever selected through the throttle. During non-Afterburner operations this fuel is re-routed for main combustion
202.1.2 Power Plant and related systems

Variable Exhaust Nozzle (VEN)
The VEN system is a self-contained, hydraulically (FUEL) controlled throat area for the exhaust gasses from the turbine and afterburner. The VEN is controlled to provide required thrust and fuel efficiencies while maintaining exhaust gas temperature
202.1.2 Power Plant and related systems

Variable Geometry
Consists of the fan variable geometry, which provides the best efficiency of the fan while preserving fan margin. It also consists of the compressor variable geometry, which provides the best efficiency of the compressor while preserving stall margin
202.1.2 Power Plant and related systems

Anti-icing
Uses fourth stage high pressure compressor bleed airs to prevent build up of ice on the front frame struts, inlet guide vanes and inlet center body. Anti-icing air enters the 18 hollow struts and passes through the number one bearing support into the center body. Anti-icing air exits through holes in the trailing edge of each strut, de-icing air exits through holes in the trailing edge of each strut, de-icing fan IGV’s and through holes around the aft side of the inlet center body. Prevents ice buildup on inlet guide vanes
202.1.2 Power Plant and related systems

Engine instrument
Converts engine parameters to cockpit readouts, advisories and cautions. EFD and LDDI Main Engine displays may be brought up on any DDI, VFC or MPCD
202.1.2 Power Plant and related systems

Throttle
Movement is transmitted by electrical interface and communicates with the FADEC and FCCs
202.1.3 Fuel Systems

Fuel storage
Fuel is carried internally by four interconnected fuselage tanks and two wing tanks. External fuel can also be carried on five 480-gallon tank
202.1.3 Fuel Systems

Refuel/Defuel
Can be done with or without electrical power. Maximum supply pressure 55 psi. Re-fueled through a single point pressure receptacle in door 8 or the IFR probe. De-fuel is done by applying suction pressure at the refuel/defuel receptacle. External fuel tank must be transferred into internal tanks by air pressure or alternate defueled through the external fuel tank cap
202.1.3 Fuel Systems

Internal Fuel Transfer
Keeps the feed tanks (2 and 3) full and controls the sequence of tank-to-tank transfer
202.1.3 Fuel Systems

Center of Gravity (CG) Control
The signal data computer monitors the amount of fuel in tanks 1 and 4; therefore, if fuel in tank 4 becomes excessive the computer will close the valves in the effected tank to prevent an aft CG problem
202.1.3 Fuel Systems

Hot Fuel Re circulation
Cools the fuel by circulating fuel up into the wings to be cooled by means of convection, which is used to dissipate heat from the AMAD and hydraulic system
202.1.3 Fuel Systems

Fuel Pressurization and Vent
Internal fuel pressurization and vent system provides ram air pressurization of all internal fuel tanks. External fuel pressurization is provided by engine bleed air
202.4.1 How does the AMAD interface with the APU and engine?
The AMAD is pneumatically connected to APU through the air turbine starter (ATS). The AMAD transmits power from the ATS to the engine for starting and motoring. Power to drive the AMAD accessories is provided by the engine during normal operation and by the APU in the ground maintenance mode of operation.
202.5.2 What special safety precautions apply to?

Fueling
The wearing of goggles, watch gauges to prevent over pressuring fuel cells and watch vents for fuel overflow. Personnel manning a fire extinguisher in the event of fuel spillage.
202.5.2 What special safety precautions apply to?

Defueling
Same precautions apply as to fueling.
202.5.1 What safety precautions must be observed during engine ground turn-up?
Do not enter area of 9-foot radius of engine inlets while engines are at idle and 25 foot while at MIL or MAX power. On engines equipped with Viton coated outer bypass ducts, combustion can produce toxic fumes of hydrogen fluoride and carbonyl fluoride. Normal brake pressure is not available with out right engine operating. To maintain aircraft control, make sure parking brake is set. To prevent damage to fuselage formers if stabilator is to be operated, doors 68 L/R must be closed, top row of fasteners installed and lockset assemblies secured.
203.1.1 State the purpose of the following communication systems

Very-High Frequency/Ultra-High Frequency (VHF/UHF)
The VHF/UHF communication system provides air-to-air and air-to-ground plain or secure communications in fixed frequency mode, anti-jam (ECCM) mode, or maritime mode
Will only travel Line of Sight.
HF-will travel over the horizon.
203.1.1 State the purpose of the following communication systems

Intercommunication and Audio System (IAS)
Provides amplification and routing of audio signals between cockpit, ground crew, and rear cockpit. It also provides supplemental and backup Communication, radio navigation, and identification (CNI) controls, combined aircraft threat warnings and advisories, weapon tones, and voice alerting.
203.1.2 State the purpose of the following navigation systems

Tactical Air Navigation (TACAN)
Used to determine the relative bearing and slant range distance to a TACAN ground station or a similar TACAN equipped aircraft. The TACAN is also used as a source to keep aircraft present position and update the aircraft present position being kept by another source (INS or ADC)
203.1.2 State the purpose of the following navigation systems

Inertial Navigation System (INS)
A self-contained, fully automatic dead reckoning navigation system. On 164945 and up A/C the INS is closely coupled by the mission computer with the global positioning system (GPS) to provide highly accurate aircraft present position and velocity data. The Ins detects aircraft motion (acceleration and attitude) and provides acceleration, velocity, present position, pitch, roll, and true heading to related systems.
203.1.2 State the purpose of the following navigation systems

Global Positioning System (GPS)
A navigation system that receives reference information from a satellite source. This satellite information provides the pilot and other aircraft systems continuously updated present position, velocity and time information.
203.1.2 State the purpose of the following navigation systems

Attitude Reference Indicator (ARI)
A self-contained attitude reference system that provides backup pitch and roll attitude for use by other systems.
203.1.2 State the purpose of the following navigation systems

Instrument Landing System (ILS)
An all weather approach guidance system. The ILS decodes transmitted azimuth and elevation signals during an aircraft approach and provides steering information to be displayed on the head-up display (HUD), the attitude reference indicator or the electronic ADI indicator display.
203.1.3 State the purpose of the following tactical mission systems

Identification Friend or Foe (IFF)
Provides automatic identification function for the aircraft.
203.1.3 State the purpose of the following tactical mission systems

Data Link
Provides digital communication between the aircraft and other shipboard, airborne, or ground systems.
203.1.3 State the purpose of the following tactical mission systems

Radio Detection and Ranging (RADAR)
Provides Air-to-air (A/A) and Air-to-ground (A/G) modes for target detection, designation, tracking and navigation
203.1.3 State the purpose of the following tactical mission systems

Mission Computer (MC)
Computes and controls the data sent to the MPCD group. Computes and produces missile launch and weapon release commands
203.1.4 State the purpose of the following Tactical Electronic Warfare Systems (TEWS)

ALQ-99 PODS
Provides Very Low, Low, Medium, and High Band radar and communication jamming capability of hostile radar and communications threats, in order to enable a safer penetration of enemy airspace.
203.1.4 State the purpose of the following Tactical Electronic Warfare Systems (TEWS)

Countermeasure set (ALQ-165)
Detects and deceives enemy pulse fire control and guidance radars
203.1.4 State the purpose of the following Tactical Electronic Warfare Systems (TEWS)

ALQ-218-
Detects, classifies, locates, and reports radar emitters and radar associated signals. The system receives these signals by way of antennas mounted around the aircraft on the forward and aft fuselage and on the wingtips.
203.1.4 State the purpose of the following Tactical Electronic Warfare Systems (TEWS)

ALQ-99 PODS-
Jams enemy radar and SAM sights.
203.1.5 Identify the location of the following major components of the AN/ALQ-99 Tactical Jamming System POD

Turbo-Generator Housing (Hardback)-
THE TOP PORTION OF THE POD THAT ALL OTHER COMPONENTS MOUNT INTO. THIS IS THE PART THAT ACTUALLY ATTACHES TO THE AIRCRAFT.
Transmitters-
LOCATED BEHIND THE RAM AIR TURBINE (RAT) FORWARD AND AFT OF THE UNIVERSAL EXCITER.
Universal Exciter (UEU)-
)- LOCATED BETWEEN THE TWO TRANSMITTERS.
203.1.5 Identify the location of the following major components of the AN/ALQ-99 Tactical Jamming System POD

Ram Air Turbo-Generator (RAT)-
LOCATED AT THE FORWARD MOST PART OF THE POD.
Radome- MOUNTS ON THE BOTTOM OF HTE POD TO ENCLOSE THE LOWER PORTION OF THE TRANSMITTERS, ANTENNAS, AND UNIVERSAL EXCITER.
203.1.5 Identify the location of the following major components of the AN/ALQ-99 Tactical Jamming System POD

Ram Air Turbo-Generator (RAT)-
LOCATED AT THE FORWARD MOST PART OF THE POD.
Radome- MOUNTS ON THE BOTTOM OF HTE POD TO ENCLOSE THE LOWER PORTION OF THE TRANSMITTERS, ANTENNAS, AND UNIVERSAL EXCITER.
203.1.6 Describe the following Multipurpose Display Group (MDG) components

Heads-Up Display (HUD
The primary flight instrument in the aircraft. It provides flight, navigational steering, and weapon delivery information. The combiner assembly reflects the symbology into the pilot's forward field of view.
203.1.6 Describe the following Multipurpose Display Group (MDG) components

Digital Display Indicators (DDI)
LDDI-used primarily for stores management, caution, advisory, and BIT displays. RDDI-used primarily for sensor displays. Information can be brought up on either DDI and both are interchangeable.
203.1.6 Describe the following Multipurpose Display Group (MDG) components

Up Front Control Display (UPCD)
Touch screen used to turn on TACAN, IFF, D/L, ILS, and Canalized Radios
203.1.6 Describe the following Multipurpose Display Group (MDG) components

Multipurpose Color Display (MPCD)-
MPCD has mechanical pushbuttons for operator inputs and is used as a multifunction display; if two different map formats are selected on the MPCD and rear MPCD, only one displays the map video as background the other display format only provides symbology.
203.1.7 Describe the function of the Digital Map Set (DMS)
The DMS is part of the Tactical Aircraft Moving Map Capability (TAMMAC) system. The DMS is made up of a Digital Map Computer (DMC) and a high speed interface cable. The purpose of the TAMMAC system is to provide enhanced navigational/tactical situational awareness to aircrew, using on-board stored moving map and image database.
203.1.8 Describe the function of the Solid State Recorder
The SSR has a removable storage cartridge that records cockpit and sensor video, also stores off-board images received from the DCS and MIDS communication system in flight and allows access to images loaded on the Removable Memory Module (RMM) during mission planning.
203.1.9 State the location, purpose, and color of the following exterior lights Position

Position
A white light just below the tip of the vertical tail fin (Vertical Stab.). Three green lights on the right side of the A/C and three red lights on the left side of the A/C. The green and red lights are located at the following locations. Wing Tip, Lex Forward of the Wing Root, Aileron Hinge
203.1.9 State the location, purpose, and color of the following exterior lights Position

Strobe LT’S
Two red (anti-collision) lights, one on each outboard vertical stab. A Sequencer enables the adjustment to the flash pulses
203.1.9 State the location, purpose, and color of the following exterior lights Position

Landing/taxi
White light on the nose gear strut. Used to illuminate the taxiway/runway
203.1.9 State the location, purpose, and color of the following exterior lights Position

Day ID Lighting
A white strobe light on the nose strut
203.1.9 State the location, purpose, and color of the following exterior lights Position

Formation lights
8 LED lights green in color. Two on each wing tip, one on the outside of each vertical stab, one below each vertical stab, and one on each side of the forward fuselage just forward of the lex
203.1.10 State the purpose of the Deployable Flight Incident Recorder Set (DFIRS)
The DFIRS has two functions; the storage of flight data and the deployment of this data. The DFIRS signal data recorder and DFIRS data transfer interface unit provide flight data storage. Thirty minutes of continuous flight data is stored. The underwater initiator is activated when the aircraft reaches a depth of 15 to 25 feet. When the recorder is deployed, the beacon transmits on the military UHF guard frequency of 243 MHz. The antenna is an integral part of the recorder and transmits signals in all directions. The battery supplies power to operate the beacon for at least 72 hours.
203.1.11 State the purpose of the following flight reference equipment

Pitot Static system
Measures pitot and static pressures surrounding the aircraft.
203.1.11 State the purpose of the following flight reference equipment

Indicated airspeed indicator
Displays airspeed as a function of the pitot and static pressure. Airspeed is indicted in 10-knot increments from 20 to 200 knots and 50-knot increments from 200 to 850 knots
203.1.11 State the purpose of the following flight reference equipment

Standby pressure altimeter
Uses static pressure and provides a pointer display for altitude to 1000 feet, a drum display for altitude 1000 feet to 50,000 feet and a four digit display for indicating barometric pressure
203.1.11 State the purpose of the following flight reference equipment

Vertical speed indicator
Senses changes in static air pressure and displays them in the form of climb or dive rate from 0 to 6000 feet per minute
203.1.12 State the purpose of the following flight reference equipment

Air Data Pressure Transmitters-
Converts pneumatic static and total pressure inputs from the L-shaped pitot static/total temperature probes into digital signals which are proportional to the measured pressures. Air data is sent to the roll-pitch-yaw computers where it is evaluated using source error corrections to produce true air data. Air data and true air data are used by roll-pitch-yaw computer software for flight control law computations, pilot displays, and other avionics systems.
203.1.12 State the purpose of the following flight reference equipment

Angle of Attack (AOA) indexer
On the left side of the HUD. Shows approach angle of attack (AOA) with lighted symbols. The indexer operates only with the landing gear down and weight off the gear. Symbol lights to indicate approach speed red V (fast), amber circle (optimum), and green V (slow). The Lighted symbol will flash if the arresting hook is up and the “HOOK BYPASS” switch is in “CARRIER”
203.1.12 State the purpose of the following flight reference equipment

Angle of Attack Transmitters-
203.1.12 State the purpose of the following flight reference equipment
203.1.13 Describe the function of the following electrical power components

Power Supply-
The electrical power supply system consists of two generators, two transformer-rectifiers (TR), one battery with dedicated battery charger, and a power distribution (bus) system.
203.1.13 Describe the function of the following electrical power components

Maintenance Battery-
The maintenance battery supplies 28vdc power to the essential and maintenance buses. The battery supplies power to the essential buses if both power supplies and both AC generators are inoperative. The battery supplies power for engine start when external power is not applied.
203.1.13 Describe the function of the following electrical power components

Generator Converter Unit (GCU)
Protects against damage due to under voltage, over voltage, over and under frequency, and feeder faults. If a fault or malfunction occurs, the GCU removes the affected generator from its buses
203.1.13 Describe the function of the following electrical power components

Utility Battery (Secondary DC Power System)
Without external power the maintenance battery is used to start aircraft and power DC essential loads.
203.1.14 Describe the function of the Automatic Flight Control System (AFCS)
Provides autopilot and automatic throttle control (ATC). Autopilot provides commands to the electronic flight control system to maintain a constant heading, altitude, or attitude. ATC positions the engine throttle levers and power lever control to maintain a constant angle of attack during landing, with approach power compensation (APC), or constant airspeed during flight, with velocity control system (VCS)
203.1.15 State the purpose of the nose wheel well Digital Display Indicator (NDDI)
Receives and stores maintenance codes from the recorder, and provides a visual display of stored maintenance codes on operator request. Provides for manual activation of MSDRS to perform fluids level test of consumable fluids.
203.1.16 State the Purpose of the Advanced Memory Unit

Advanced Memory Unit (AMU)-
Replaced by the DMD.
203.1.16 State the Purpose of the Advanced Memory Unit

Digital Memory Device (DMD)-
Programmable solid state memory device. Records mission and maintenance data on two downloadable memory cards.
203.1.17 State the purpose of Flight Incident Recorder and Monitoring System (FIRAMS)
Monitors engine and airframe operational status for unit failures and caution/advisory conditions when the mission computer system is operating. If the mission computer system detects a unit failure, it commands the FIRAMS to store the applicable maintenance code. When the mission computer system detects specific unit failures, it commands the FIRAMS to store significant maintenance data and selected tactical information in a solid-state memory device.
203.1.18 Discuss the Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System (JHMCS
The JHMCS is used to cue, verify and employ weapons and sensors in high of borsight angles. The JHMCS improves the situational awareness, increases aircraft survivability and increases the ability to acquire a visual target
204.1.1      State the purpose of the following components of the Stores Management System or (SMS)

Armament control processor set
The brain of the SMS system consists of the Armament Computer and up to nine Signal Data Computer Converters.
204.1.1      State the purpose of the following components of the Stores Management System or (SMS)

Command Launch Computer (CLC)
The command launch computer (CLC) controls and monitors the high-speed anti-radiation missile (HARM).
204.1.2 Describe the following characteristics of the M61 20mm Gun system.


Rate of fire:
High-6000 rounds per minute; Low-4000 rounds per minute.
204.1.2 Describe the following characteristics of the M61 20mm Gun system.


Capacity
The system can accommodate a maximum of 400 rounds of 20mm ammunition. 
204.1.2 Describe the following characteristics of the M61 20mm Gun system.

Modes of operation
Two Air to Ground Modes
Continuously Computed Impact Point (CCIP)
Manual (MAN)
One Air-to-Air mode
Air-to-Air (A/A)
204.1.3 State the purpose of the Countermeasures Dispensing system (AN/ALE-47).
The system provides protection for the aircraft against enemy radars and missiles by ejecting chaff, flares, or other jammer payloads.
204.1.4 State the basic armament configuration of the F/A-18E/F aircraft
2 - wing tip mounted LAU-127 missile launcher. (stations 1 and 11)
2 - LAU-116 missile launchers. (stations 5 and 7)
4 - SUU-79 wing pylons, (stations 3,4,8 and 9)
1 - SUU-78 centerline pylon. (station 6)
2 - SUU-80 (stations 2 and 10)
1 - M61 gun.
204.1.5 State the basic characteristics of the following air-to-air missiles.

AIM-7 series (Sparrow) guided missile
Is a supersonic, radar guided, air-to-air weapon Semi-active homing, hydraulically operated control surfaces direct and stabilize the missile on course.
204.1.5 State the basic characteristics of the following air-to-air missiles.

AIM-9 series (Sidewinder) guided missile
Is a supersonic, air-to-air weapon, with a passive infrared target detection, proportional-navigation guidance, and torque balance control system.
204.1.5 State the basic characteristics of the following air-to-air missiles.

AIM-120 Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile (AMRAAM)
Is a supersonic, air-to-air weapon, with active radar target detection and on-board inertial navigation guidance.
204.1.6 State the basic characteristics of the following air to ground missiles.


AGM-65 (Maverick) series missile
Is a guided, rocket propelled, air-to-ground missile for use against field fortifications, surface to air missile sites and armored vehicles. The forward section of the missile consists of a hermetically sealed guidance unit and main section. There are two types, Semi-Active Laser and Passive Infrared.
204.1.6 State the basic characteristics of the following air to ground missiles.

Harpoon
Is a long range, all weather anti ship missile. It can be launched at various altitudes, airspeeds, and aircraft attitudes and uses a low-level cruise trajectory, active radar guidance and terminal maneuvering to destroy the target. 
204.1.6 State the basic characteristics of the following air to ground missiles.

AGM-84 (series) missile

Standoff Land Attack Missile (SLAM)
Is an air-to-ground guided missile designated for use against both stationary and mobile targets. The SLAM can be loaded with up to three pre-planned (PP) mission and one target of opportunity (TOO) mission. It is a video guided missile, controlled by the launching aircraft or by a second aircraft through the data link mode.
204.1.6 State the basic characteristics of the following air to ground missiles.

AGM-88

High-speed Anti-Radiation Missile (HARM)
Is a passive supersonic, air-to-ground missile used for defense suppression, such a surface to air missile sites (SAMS)
205.1.2 Explain the term AAW and discuss the role of the
EA-18G in an AAW mission
The detection, tracking, destruction or neutralization of enemy air platforms and airborne weapons, whether launched by the enemy from air, surface, subsurface, or land platforms.

The Hornet's specific strengths lie in its ability to detect contacts at medium range (around 40nms) and contacts that are not hot to the fighters (i.e. beaming, dragging or flanking).
205.1.3 Explain the term AMW and discuss the role of the
EA-18G in an AMW mission.
Attacks launched from the sea by naval forces and by landing forces embarked in ships or craft designed to achieve a shore presence in a littoral zone. This includes fire support for troops in contact with enemy forces through the use of close air support or shore bombardment.
205.1.3 Explain the term AMW and discuss the role of the
EA-18G in an AMW mission.
The Hornet performs AMW primarily through Close Air Support (CAS), and are controlled via a ground based Forward Air Controller (FAC) or a Forward Air Controller - Airborne (FAC-A) an air based controller in an F-14 or A-10. CAS involves our checking in with the FAC or FAC-A and having our eyes talked onto the target area from large features to small until we have the actual target in sight. We then drop ordnance on the target, and may get corrections from the FAC for follow on ordnance delivery.
205.1.4 Explain the term ASU and discuss the role of the
EA-18G in an ASU mission.
The detection, tracking, and destruction or neutralization of enemy surface combatants and merchant ships.
We have little to do with ASU. This became a PMA of ours during the cold war, when it was likely that we would openly engage in hostilities with the Soviet Fleet. Currently, we perform Sledge Hammer events to practice attacking a large combatant, but the most likely use of ASU for the Hornet is our destroying a small, heavily armed boat, inbound to the CVN.
205.1.5 Explain the term ASW and discuss the role of the
EA-18G in an ASW mission.
The detection, tracking, and destruction or neutralization of enemy submarines.
We currently don't do any ASW. S-3's and Helos do the bulk of this mission.
205.1.6 Explain the term CCC and discuss the role of the
EA-18G in a CCC mission.
Providing communications and related facilities for coordination and control of external organizations or forces, and control of own unit's capabilities.
The Hornet performs CCC on virtually every mission, with the integration of our Ground Control Intercepts (GCI) or Airborne Intercept Control (AIC). If we perform any mission within the battle group, we are normally assigned a controller to alert us to hostile aircraft in the vicinity. Talking to the AIC or GCI controller’s exercises this PMA
205.1.7 Explain the term C2W and discuss the role of the
EA-18G in a C2W mission.
The integrated use of psychological operations (PSYOP), military deception, operations security (OPSEC), electronic warfare (EW), and physical destruction; mutually supported by intelligence, to deny information to, influence, degrade, or destroy adversary C2 capabilities while protecting friendly C2 capabilities
The E-2 and Air Force Rivet Joint assets are primarily responsible for this, as well as the ES-3's on board.
205.1.8 Explain the term FSO and discuss the role of the
EA-18G in a FSO mission.
Naval forces and designated shore facilities providing supporting services other than logistics replenishment to fleet units.
This is not one of our PMA's. We occasionally run missile profiles against the battle group ships.
205.1.9 Explain the term INT and discuss the role of the
EA-18G in an INT mission.
The collection, processing, and evaluation of information to determine location, identification, and capability of hostile forces through the employment of reconnaissance, surveillance, and other means.
This is not one of our PMA's. Our input to INT involves the pilot's airborne observations as well as any airborne sensor footage (FLIR) that we might be able to collect.
205.1.10 Explain the term MIW and discuss the role of the
EA-18G in a MIW mission.
The use of mines for control/denial of sea or harbor areas, and mine countermeasures over, under, or upon the surface.
This is one of our PMA's, and is the only mission area that is strategic in nature. We have few opportunities to practice mining, and they usually occur during workups. We are evaluated during the IDTC by having a CV wide MINEX as well as the Mine Readiness Certification and Inspection (MRCI). Each Hornet can carry 2 mines, and with GPS and the Hornet's precise delivery capability, we are able to place mines with remarkable accuracy.
205.1.11 Explain the term MOB and discuss the role of the
EA-18G in a MOB mission
The ability of naval forces to maneuver and maintain themselves in all situations over, under, or upon the surface.
Mobility involves our ability to deploy and get around. It is one of our PMA's. We get points for and include our pilot's NATOPS and Instrument checks, CQ simulators, FCLPs, shipboard CQ and Airways Navigation.
205.1.12 Explain the term NCO and discuss the role of the
EA-18G in a NCO mission.
Selected operations of a noncombatant nature not clearly categorized in any other warfare mission area. Included in this category are the necessary support requirements and/or special missions that are required of a unit but not directly related to the other Warfare Mission Areas.
Not one of our PMA's. Our squadron's involvement with Non-Combat Expeditionary Operations (NEO) has become more likely in the last few years. NEO's would normally involve flying protection for a helicopter evacuation of an area that is becoming dangerous for US citizens. Or flying presence ops over a country to establish stability and announce that US forces are in the area.
205.1.13 Explain the term STW and discuss the role of the
EA-18G in a STW mission.
The destruction or neutralization of enemy targets ashore through the use of conventional or nuclear weapons. This includes, but is not limited to, strategic targets, building yards, and operating bases from which the enemy is capable of conducting air, surface, or subsurface operations against U.S. or allied forces.
This is one of our most important PMA's. The squadron fly's STW missions in all theaters we pull into. Strike planning is a necessary part of the pilot's mission. The Hornet's involvement in STW can include dropping MK-80 series bombs, GBU's, Walleye, Maverick, JSOW and HARM. STW missions include executing pre-planned strikes in country, interdiction bombing campaigns, kill box missions and contingency operations.
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