Gothic Vocab Flashcards

Chartes Cathedral
Terms Definitions
incipient
beginning
Sainte-Chapelle (dates)
1243-1248
Flying Buttress
sojourn
a temporary stay
audacity
boldness or daring
candelabrum
a candle chandelier
ephemeron
something short lived
Amiens
1220
France
-towers different sizes
-later, more decoration, sculpture expanding past the portals
-one of tallest!
-lots of sculpture in the portals
Salisbury Cathedral (image)
respite
a delay in time
Avatar
Graphic representaion or people
Tracery
Branching ornamental stonework. Supports glass in window
Early Gothic time period
1140-1194
Amiens Cathedral (location)
Amiens, France
Royal portal
in Chartes cathedral
castellated
high walls like a tle
stringcourse
a continuous projecting horizontal band set in the surface of a wall and usually molded.
Ameins, Beau Dieu
1220-1225
France
-more realistic physical form
-almost separate from architectural setting
-beautiful God (v. Romanesque judge...now blessing)
>trying to draw people into the church
-standing on a lion and a dragon (Christianity overcomes secular and evil)
High gothic: Rayonnant time period
1194-1300
in sooth
in truth or in reality
Dissemble
to hide under a false apperance
tabard
a short sleeveless outer tunic emblazoned with a coat of arms
drolleries
in Gothic manuscript illumination, the playful designs added to the margins depicting scenes of leap-frog and other amusements, as well as images of plants and animals.
Gothic
1140-1500
Originally dero, a style of architecture developed in northern France that spread throughout Europe between the 12th and 16th centuries; characterized by height, pointed arches, flying buttresses, and light
Portal
Entrance to church (usually facing West)
Bosses
Elaborately curved knobs where the ribs meet
gargoyle
an open-mouthed grotesque figure, most often used as a waterspout, projecting from an upper gutter or rooftop of a building, used to carry water away from the walls
Notre Dame facade fifth floor
bell towers
Rose and lancet windows
in Chartes Cathedral
dissimulation
describing how someone hides under a false apperance
corbel
stone bracket projecting from a wall or corner (the clerestory) to support the rib arches.
mullion
a vertical strip between the casements or panes of a window
transom
the horizontal division of a window constructed of wood or stone.
Triforiums
a band of arcades, frequently blind arcades, below the clerestory. Its insertion frequently results in a four story elevation
Pinnacle
Pointed end of a spire, buttress etc.
Divine light
sunlight that is seemingly transformed into sacred light (God's light) as it passes through stained glass windows
Earliest example of flying buttresses is found here
Notre dame
choir screen
Physical barrier in church to separate visitors from the choir and priest
choir
the area of the church between a transept and main apse. It is the area where the service is sung and clergy may stand, and the main or high altar is located. In some churches there is no choir, while in others, the choir is quite large and surrounded by an ambulatory.
moralized Bible
a heavily illustrated Bible, each page pairing paintings of Old and New Testament episodes with explanations of their moral significance
Flamboyant tracery
flamelike tracery made up of curves and countercurves
Rayonnant
the radiant style of the high Gothic age
Rose window
a circular window with stained glass and stone tracery used on the facades and the ends of the transepts in Gothic cathedrals
High Gothic Elevation
3 story elevation, removed gallery
(From bottom to top)
Arcade
Triforium
Clerestory
radiating chapels open up to create a continuous space, rib vaults stop at capitals, a lot of stained glass, pointed arches
Saint-Denis
idiosyncrasy
a mannerism that is not normal for the person
coif
a skullcap worn by nuns under a veil or by soldiers under a hood of mail or formerly by British sergeants-at-law
hall church
a structure which does not contain a clerestory or triforium; thus the aisles and nave will be approximately the same height.
lancet window
a tall, narrow window crowned by a sharply pointed arch
Buon Fresco
True or wet fresco; pigments are mixed with water and become chemically bound to the freshly laid lime plaster
Notre Dame facade fourth floor
hanging space for cathedral bells
hammer beam ceiling
In order to give greater height in the center, the ordinary tie beam is cut through, and the portions remaining, known as hammer beams, are supported by curved braces from the wall
Chartres cathedral, Portal of the South Transept
figures now sit in front of column rather than as the column.
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