Greek Drama Vocab Flashcards

Terms Definitions
Hubris
excessive pride
lethargic
unnaturally drowsy; sluggish, dull (from Lethe, a river in Hades whose waters, when drunk, caused forgetfulness)
labyrinthine
full of confusing passageways; intriguing; complicated like a maze (from the Labyrinth, a fabled maze in Crete)
herculean
very difficult; requiring great strength or effort (from Hercules (Heracles), a hero of superhuman strength)
aegis
shied or protection; auspices, sponsorship (from aegis, the protective shield Zeus and symbol of Athena)
Classical
characterized by consciousness of perfection of form; opposed to "formlessness" of the romantic
Blank Verse
unrhymed iambic pentameter verse
Laconic
using words sparingly; terse; concise (from lakonikos, meaning Spartan; the Spartans were known for their terseness)
ambrosial
exceptionally pleasing to taste or smell; extremely delicious, excellent (from ambrosia, food of the gods)
jovial
jolly, merry, good-humored (from Jove, or Jupiter - the planet Jupiter was at one point believed to make those born under its influence cheerful)
hermetic
airtight (from Hermes, who among his other attributes was the god of magic)
draconian
cruel, harsh, severe (from Draco, an Athenian lawmaker who drew up a harsh code of laws)
auroral
pertaining to or resembling the dawn (from Aurora, goddess of the dawn)
Chorus
singing and dancing groups in Greek tragedy - derives from Dionysiac rituals
Iambic
an unaccented syllable followed by an accented one
Exodos
conclusion of the play (similar to epilogue)
Tragedy
form of drama in which the protagonist undergoes a morally significant struggle
Golden Mean
Doctrine of moderation in all things; taking nothing to excess
Episode
any unit of action in a play; comparable to a scene
atlas
book of maps (from Atlas, a giant who supported the world on his shoulders)
Polis
"city-state"
Anagnorisis
recognition
Stasimon
Greek statis
choragos
chorus leader
monologue
speaking alone
logeion
speaking place
hamartia
tragic flaw.
Reversal
good to bad
Tragic Hero Cycle
Areté-Hubris-Até-Apotheosis-
peripetia
reversal of fortune
skene
costume changes place
Thespis
the inventor of tragedy
Parados
entrance used by chorus
Electra Complex
daughter likes dad
Melpomene
the muse of tragedy
lines next to people
pardos
deuteragonist
secondary character who accompanies the main protagonist
Oracle of Delphi
shrine to Apollo
Dionysius
emotion without intellect. instinct, feeling appetite
Aeschylus
Who added a second actor?
catharsis
(psychoanalysis) purging of emotional tensions
Orchestra
dancing place where actors performed
prologue
an introduction to a play
Actors
All men until late 1800s
what was more imp. effective rhetorical delivery of lines or realism of dialogue?
delivery
nomos
human laws instituted by a city
sophocles
introduced third actor, made the chorus 15 men, invented painted scenery
oikos
the family unit, including its physical property; its needs are often in tension with the polis
Dithyramb
Hyms, coral od to a god
antistrophe
second movement, singing while turning west to east
(Tragic Structure) Greeks:
man ruled by fate
Cult of Dionysus
controversial practice involving uninhibited dancing and emothional displays that created an altered mental state
archetype
(in Jungian psychology) a collectively inherited unconscious idea, pattern of thought, image, etc., universally present in individual psyches.
protagonist
main character in a fiction or drama
Theatron
seeing place where audience sat. Could hold 16,000 people (only for free males at first, but later for women and slaves, too).
recognition
the point at which a character understands his or her situation as it really is.
stage direction
instructions written by the dramatist to describe the appearance and actions of characters, as well as the sets, props,costumes, sound effects and lighting for a play
Tragic Hero
A fundamentally decent guy who undergoes a change of fortune due to one flaw
Periakti
While a bit speculative, the later Greek theater may have used revolving painted triangular prisms that revolved, and so change the senery on-stage.
thespian
pertaining to tragedy or to the dramatic art in general.
Cleisthenes
founder of Greek democracy 2500 years ago
Greek actors
only men, young men played girls
City Dionysia
contained the festival in which playwrights would contribute tragedies and a satyr comedy
verisimilitude
apperance of truth; quality of seeming to be true
denouement
rapid cause and effect chain from climax to resolution
corinth
ancient city in greece, oedipus's home and supposed birthplace
festivals
spring and one specific to the community
Aristotle
father of science, literature, and one of the greatest philosophers
Action(unity)
all action centers around the main character (no sub plots)
The greek theater grew out of the worship of which god?
Dionysus
Deus ex Machina
any moment, usually unsatisfying, in which characters are rescued from conflict at the last moment by luck or improbable accidents. "God from the machine".
eithics and morals
what were sophocles early plays about
Thymele
Altar in the center of the orchestra used to make sacrifices to Dionysus.
peripeteia
reversal of fate (from good fortune to bad, usually)
Tragic Flaw
the hero falls becuase of some weakness of character, moral blindness
strophe
when the chorus moves from right to left
moira
Greek term for "fate" or "the sharer out." Customarily, fate was depicted as 3 sisters who spun out the thread of one's life. One spun the thread, the second determined the length, and the third (representing death) cut the thread.
strophie
stanza in which the chorus moves in one direction
Time(unity)
all action occurs in real time (24 hours)
Dionysus
god of wine and revelry who died in the Winter and was born again in the Spring
comic relief
a humorous scene or incident in an otherwise serious or tragic work;breaks the tension yet emphasizes the unfolding tragedy
23
how old was sophocles when he won his first playwrighting contest
Parode
A song sung by the chorus when it enters
Satyr play
also known as a farce, parodies the same tragic figures and provides comic relief
the 3 actors by sophocles
i. protagonist
ii. deuteragonist (2nd actor)
iii. tritaganist (3rd actor)
exodus
exit song of the chorus after the last episode
oedipus at colonus
what is an example of his final plays
quest for identity
in search for your true self; main theme in many Greek plays
3 theban plays of Antigone
oedipus Rex, oedipus at colonus, antigone
what was the chorus
12-15 ppl, represented a group of old women or men
c.550 and c.220 BC
What time period was the height opf theatre in Greece?
How was it performed?
there was a sacrifice of a goat, play writing contest
(all citizens required to attend)
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