Greek tragedy Flashcards

Terms Definitions
emotional break; scatological humor
comedy
nemesis
fate that cannot be escaped
Thespian comes from Thespis; playwright; transforms drama from chanting to acting; put an actor on the stage
Sophocles
Stasimon
Choral ode, alternates with episodes and includes kommos
hubris
arrogance or overweening pride which causes the hero's transgression against the gods; usually the tragic flaw
orchestra
dancing space; circular; where chorus would dance and interact with actors
Catharsis
purging or cleansing which allows the viewer to become enlightened and emotionally stronger
hamartia
a tragic flaw, weakness of character or error in judgment, which causes the downfall of the hero
used to show characters in flight; frequently used for gods
Proskeneon:
tragedy
an imitation of a serious action which will arouse pity and fear in the viewer
in Antigone, towards the end: a praising poem, appeasing poem: attempt to convince gods not to allow tragedy to happen
Three Unities
Episode
act or scene in which the plot is developed
proscenium
stage
Peripeteia
reversal of fortune
Aeschylus
Used two actors
skene
background to the stage
Sophocles
Added a third actor
prologue
an introduction to a play
theatron
seating area of the theater
inherent
inborn tendencies; you inherit them
recognition (anagnorisis)
"knowing again/back/throughout"; a change from ignorance to awarness of a bond of love or hate.
catastrophe
the turning point in the tragedy
dramatic structure
inciting moment, exposition, rising action, complication, climax, reversal, falling action aka Plot
exposition
introduction of play, where audience is exposed to situation and conflict
Mimesis
The imitative element of nature and human behavior, best manifested in poetry.
Anagnorisis
Recognition of truth about one's self and his actions; moment of clarity
eccyclema
wheeled cart turned to show changing scene or time
inciting moment
starting point of dramatic structure or plot
Thespis
Greek poet who is said to have originated Greek tragedy
Parados
Chorus dances down either side of the stage and doesn't leave.
suffering (pathos)
"a clamity"; the third element of plot is "a destructive or painful act."
ate
mask
dithyrambs
goat songs
12
Aeschylus' chorus size
50
original chorus size
exode
a farcical (humorous) afterpiece
Euripides
known for strong female characters, intelligent slaves, satirizing heroes, etc.
(author of Medea)
arete
Greek word for inborn capacities; tendencies/qualities you are born with
Exidos
Chorus speaks final line and exits
Denouement
an outcome or solution; the unraveling of a plot
Aristotle
(382 B.C. - 322 B.C.) Greek philosopher; author of the Poetics
reversal
turning point of play, usually follows climax
Enternains, acts as ideal spectator
functions of chorus
narrative
(the author telling a story). tragedy (as opposed to epic) relies on enactment (dramatic performance) not on narrative.
Pathos
The emotions of pity and fear, as aroused by a tragic plot
tragic force
event starting falling action in a tragedy; often follows close after climax
imitation (mimesis)
the artist doesn't just COPY the shifting appearances f the world, but rather imitates or REPRESENTS reality itself, giving form and meaning to that reality.
Greek Tragedy
depicts the downfall of a nobel hero or heroine, usually through some combination of fate (hubris), and the will of the gods. the tragic hero's powerful wish to achieve some goal inevitably encounters limits, usually those of human frailty, the gods, or nature. the hero need not die in the end, but must undergo a change in fortune. in addition, tragic hero may achieve some revelation or recognition about human fate, destiny, and the will of the gods.
Anagorisis
Realisation of truth
Recognition
Character discovers major info
kommos
emotional lyric between actors and chorus
karos
abundance/ prosperity (part of heroic figure pattern)
chorus
people chanting lyrics in which they bear relation to the play's theme
dramatic irony
words/actions of a character that carries meaning but the audience knows much more
fatal flaw
error in protagonist which leads to their downfall
City/Greater Dionysia
Annual Athenian festival in honor of Dionysus, at which dramatic competitions were held
Messenger
The man who brought told Oedipus the truth about him; The man who transported Oedipus to Polybus and Merope
ode
a type of lyric poem; used in the stasimon
verbal irony
words used to suggest the opposite of what is meant
5 elements of a Tragedy
Prologue, Parados, Episode, Stasimon, Exodus
City Dionysia/ Greater Dionysia
Annual Athenian festival in honor of dionysus, at which dramatic competitions were held.
The Oedipus Legend
He would kill his father and sleep with his mother
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