greek tragedy vocab Flashcards

Terms Definitions
Cosmos
Order.
deuteragonistes
second actor
Oedipus
Tragic hero
parados
entrance of chorus
Catharsis
purging of emotion
Aeschylus
524-456 BCE
- The Orestria
Theatron
seats for the audience
Parodos
(literally, "passageways") are the paths by which the chorus and some actors (such as those representing messengers or people returning from abroad) made their entrances and exits.
orchestra
where chorus and actors performed
actor
the performer who impersonates the fictional character
exciting force
moves action, problem is presented
Masks
Characters wore them. Their purposes were to show age, gender, and social class
Dionysus
God of Wine and Vine (Fertility)
Agora
Town square where performances took place, also doubled as a marketplace
Chorus
Summerize what happened, open and close new episodes, set mood through song and dance, provide background information, and advise or question characters in the play
Agon
Scene where two characters put their case in a long speech
Skene
Greek for "tent." In the earliest fifth-century productions, probably this structure really was a tent at the back of the orchestra where the actors would change costumes and masks. Later, the tent was replaced by a permanent structure, and later still, by a stone skene building.
Exodus
Conclusion, or ending chorus sings at end
Unity of place
happens in the same place
Stasimon
Any choral ode sung after the Parodos
Hubris
Excessive pride (thinking you are a god)
dramatic competitions
each author submits 4 plays (3 tragedy, 1 comedy)
Pathos
An element in eperience or art evoking pity or compassion; an emotion of sympathetic pity
Strophe
A part of the stasimon sung while the chorus danced from stage right to stage left.
Satyr play
a play that parodies the same tragic figures in the tragedy. Provides comic relief
Deus ex Machina
literally "god from the machine", in classical drama the character, usually a god, who enters at the end of a play to resolve the complexities of a plot which would other wise be insoluble. In Greek tragedy, he was lowered by a crane (mechane). The use of this device was later criticized as showing the dramatist's lack of skill in resolving his plot naturally. By extension, the term has come to mean any arbitrary form of plot resolution.
Anagnorisis
A recognition on the part of the hero; change from ignorance to knowledge
Strophe and Antistrophe
2 diff divisons of chros 2 different voices
Polis
People
Laios
Oedipus's father
Episodes
play is acted
dramatis personae
list of characters/cast
defilement
a violation of chastity
Peripetia
A reversal of fortune
exposition
the beginning of a tragedy
Hamartia
although sometimes used synonymously with tragic flaw, it is actually an error in judgement or an ignorance of certain facts that leads to the hero's downfall or reversal in fortune; is often caused by the tragic flaw
prologos
any introductory speech preceding the action of the play; serves as exposition
blank verse
unrhymed verse. In iambic pentameter
dithyramb
choral songs in honor of Dionysus
Protagonist
The leading role in a play
Catastrophe
The closing portion of a drama; according to the Ancients, the fifth and final part of a plot.
strophe, antistrophe, and epode
metric stanza or arrangement
Thespis
introduced the 1st singular speaker in a play
Oracle
The medium through which a god speaks
Choryphaeus
Chorus leader, steps forward to speak with protagonists
Prologue
section of a tragedy before the parados
pun
humorous use of a word with two meanings
First Episode
first of many "episodes," when the characters and chorus talk
Recognition
A scene or moment in a narrative when the protagonist (or, sometimes, another character) gains some knowledge that causes a reversal in the plot. (Although the term recognition may be misleading, it actually refers to any moment in which knowledge is gained, not only to a recognition in the conventional sense.) When a recognition serves as the turning point in the narrative structure, it is often called a discovery.
A scene or moment in a narrative when the protagonist (or, sometimes, another character) gains some knowledge that causes a reversal in the plot. (Although the term recognition may be misleading, it actually refers to any moment in which knowledge is gained, not only to a recognition in the conventional sense.) When a recognition serves as the turning point in the narrative structure, it is often called a discovery.
Ekkyklema
A cart inside the Skene that could be rolled out to display the result of an event inside
Strophe & Antistrophe
movements of the chorus; also refers to sections of a choral ode
tragic flaw
a weakness or flaw in the character of a tragic hero or heroine, causing that character's downfall
/ 52
Term:
Definition:
Definition:

Leave a Comment ({[ getComments().length ]})

Comments ({[ getComments().length ]})

{[comment.username]}

{[ comment.comment ]}

View All {[ getComments().length ]} Comments
Ask a homework question - tutors are online