AP English 7 Flashcards

Terms Definitions
Haughty
Arrogant
heist
robbery
prescience
foreknowledge
Ominous
Threatening
plethora
overfullness, superabundance
negligent
careless, irresponsible
halcyon
peaceful, tranquil
sanctimonious
self righteous
apathetic
indifferent, unconcerned
insipid
without flavor; tasteless
archetype
a perfect example
invert
turn upside down
dissension
difference of opinion
turgid
swollen; distended; tumid.
aptitude
(n) quickness to learn
Tenacity
quality of persistent, stubborn
Malleable
Easily shaped, or influenced
labyrinthine
(adj.) - intricate, maze-like
prolixity
excessive and unnecessary wordiness
castgate
to punish, chastise, criticize severely
Eulogy
a panegyric, encomium, tribute, testimonial
Bilious
peevish or irritable; sickeningly unpleasant
CUISINE
(n) food; style of cooking
didactic
intended for instruction; instructive. inclined to teach or lecture others too much
divisive
(adj.) - causing conflict, opposition
colloquial
characteristic of informal spoken language or conversation
sanguine
cheerfully optimistic, hopeful, or confident:
purview
range of skills or authority; capability
dogmatic
an authoritative assertion of opinions or beliefs
sentimental
a term that describes characters' excessive emotional response to experience; also nauseatingly nostalgic and mawkish
prose
ordinary speech or writing without rhyme or meter; referring to speech or writing other than verse
blase
indifferent to or bored with life
Assonance
The repeated use of vowel sounds.
Absolve
to clear of guilt or blame
Euphemism
A(n) _______________ is mild or pleasant sounding expression that substitutes for a harsh, indelicate, or simply less pleasant idea. _______________ are often used to soften the impact of what is being discussed. For example, the word "departed" is a(n) ________________ for the word "dead." just as the phrase "in the family way" is a(n) _______________ for the word "pregnant."
Diction
can be serious, formal, simple, playful
canard
(noun). a false rumor, fabricated story, hoax
Metaphor
Metaphor comparison of two unlike things using the verb "to be" and not using like or as as in a simile.
beguile
to influence by trickery, flattery, etc.; mislead; delude.
Rhythm
the ordered or free occurences of sound in poetry
Ex. To be | or not | to be, | that is | the ques- tion
perception
becoming aware of something via the senses
satire
a work that reveals a critical attitude toward some element of human behavior by porting it in an extreme or exaggerated way
predicate
to base (an action, statement, etc); to affrim as a quality or attribute of something
image
a word or phrase representing that which can be seen, touched, tasted, smelled, or felt; imagery is the use of images in speech and writing
EXULT
(v) to rejoice greatly; be jubilant, triumphant
Recant
To withdraw or to repudiate a statement or belief, revoke
introvert
person more interested in own thoughts and feelings than in matters outside the self
diurnal
(adj) daily; in daytime; active in daytime
premise; major, minor
two parts of a syllogism
ellipsis
three dots that indicate words have been left out of quotation
conceit
a fanciful expression, usually in the form of an extended metaphor or surprising analogy between seemingly dissimlar objects. displays intellectual cleverness due to the unusual comparison being made
analogy
a similarity between like features of two things, on which a comparison may be based:
symbolism
When a thing represents more than just itself
inductive reasoning
reasoning that begins by citing a number of specific instances or examples and then shows how collectively they constitute a general principal
cultural criticism
criticism that sets literature in a social context
critique
an analysis or assessment of a thing or situation for the purpose of determining its nature, limitations, and conformity to a set of standards
laconic
short or terse- the lake has few words
historical commentary
a spoken or written piece which provides insight, fact, or opinion including historical events
Theme
The idea or point of a story formulated as a generalization
Personification
A figure of speech in which ideas or objects are described as having human qualities or personalities
(And the sun smiled down on me)
metonymy
a figure of speech in which a term naming an object is substituted for anouther word with which it is closely associated
KILOMETER
(n) unit of length = 1000 meters (0.62 mile)
Flashback
a device in the narrative of a motion picture, novel, etc., by which an event or scene taking place before the present time in the narrative is inserted into the chronological structure of the work
Point of View-second
a story directed to the reader using "you";
used most commonly when giving directions
to prostrate
to lie down on the ground in humility, submission, or admiration; often implies groveling
conjecture
guess
credence
belief
Prodigious
enormous
repining
wishing discontentedly
populace
population, inhabitants
tantalize
teased, tempted
inscrutable
puzzling, incomprehensible
indigenous
domestic, homegrown
proclivity
tendency or inclination
logos
appeals to reason
fiat
dictim, mandate, decree
bona fide
good faith
denotation
strict, literal, dictionary definition.
sleazy
cheap; ethically low, mean
assuage
to lessen the intensity
DUPLICITY
(n) double-dealing; conniving; lying
gratuitous
adj--unnecessary and unwarranted; without cause
perfidious
deliberately faithless; treacherous; deceitful:
mendacious
adj. lying; habitually dishonest; untruthful
gamut
a complete extent or range
refractory
resisting; intractable; hard to manage
oxymoron
contradictory words used together (jumbo shrimp, bittersweet, etc)
 
ATROPHY
wasting away of the body
diatribe
a bitter, sharply abusive denunciation, attack, or criticism:
Syllogism
a three-part deductive argument in which a conclusion is based on a major premise and a minor premise
paradox
a statement that seems contradictory but isn't
connotation
a suggested association a word communicates along with its dictionary definition
iconoclastic
seeking to overthrow popular beliefs and tradtions
parody
a composition that imitates somebody's style in a humorous way
crass
grossness of the mind, dismissing manners
tone
author's attitude toward his material &/or the audience.
Alliteration
The repetition of consonant sounds, usually at the beginning of words
carping
(adj) tending to find fault, especially in a petty, nasty or hairsplitting way (n) petty, nagging criticismSYN- NITPICKING- cavilingANT- APPROVING, uncritical
utopian
founded upon or involving idealized perfection.
sarcasm
witty language used to convey insults or scorn
sestina
6 six-line stanzas ending with tercet; last words of each line in 1st stanza are repeated as last words in next stanza, 39 lines
resources of language
figurative speech varying sentence length or rhetorical questions
voice
the real or assumed personality used by a writer or speaker. it can be active or passive
Allege
v. to assert without proof or confirmation
Figurative Language
language that contains figures of speech, such as similes andmetaphors. in order to create associations that are imaginative rather than literal.
repudiate
to disown, reject, or deny the validity of
Motif
the repetition or variations of an image or idea in a work used to develop theme or characters
antimetabole
repeating words in revers order for sureise and emphasis
auditory imagery
language/words appealing to the sense of sound/hearing
Onomatopoeia
A work capturing or approximating the sound of what it describes, such as "buzz" or "hiss."
ubiquitous
existing or being everywhere, esp. at the same time; omnipresent:
Foil
A character who is in most ways opposite to the main character (protagonist) or one who is nearly the same as the protagonist. The purpose of the foil character is to emphasize the traits of the main character by contrast only
Deduction
a kind of reasoning that assumes a general principle (major premise) and applies that to a specific application (minor premise)
synedoche
figure of speech in which a part stands for a whole
periodic scentence
a sentence that presents its central meaning in the main clause at the end
annotation
explanatory notes added to a text to explain, clarify, or prompt further thought.
periodic sentence
a sentence that presents its central meaning in a main clause at the end. This independent clause is preceded by a phrase or clause that cannot stand alone. The effect of (this) is to add emphasis and structural variety.
Sated (adj.)
1.to satisfy (any appetite or desire) fully. 2.to fill to excess; surfeit; glut.
syntax
the study of the rules for the formation of grammatical sentences in a language.
anecdote
a brief narrative offered in a text to capture the audience's attention or to support a generalization or claim
naturalism
a term often used as a synonym for realism; also a view of experience that is generally characterized as bleak and pessimistic
villanelle
19 line fixed form. 5 tercets and 1 quatrain of abba
Don Juan
the name of a literary womanizer; the term refers to any man who is irristable to woman and cosntantly pursues them
inference
the act or process of to deriving by reason, to conclude or judge from premises or evidence
ethos
"i'm not a doctor but i play one on tv" ethos described character; the natural disposition or moral character
Freytag's Pyramid: Crisis/ Climax/ Turning Point
the point at which the opposing forces that create the conflict interlock in the decisive action on which a plot WILL turn
akin
related/similar
anaphora
repetition
credulous
gullible
exposition
public exhibition
impartial
unbiased; neutral
kleptomaniac
pathological thief
vitrid
nasty, vengeful
Plenary
unlimited, unrestircted, absolute
lexicon
dictionary, wordbook, glossary
aggrandize
to make great
description
recreate/invent an event.
poem expressing sorrow
plaint
philippic
a strong verbal denunciation
denotative
containing an exact meaning
inherent
essential, fundamental, or basic
envoy
a representative or messenger
Blank Verse
unrhymed iambic pentameter
avid
enthusiastic; ardent; dedicated; keen:
Welthow
Queen of Herot, Hrothgar's wife
motivation
reasons for a character's behavoir
hyperbole
figure of speechusing deliberate exaggeration or overstatement
Allusion
brief reference (sometimes indirect) to something outside the text, usually to literature, religion, history, etc.
duress
(noun) Definition: compulsion by threat or force; forcible restraint Synonyms: imprisonment, coercion, constraint.
abortive
failing to accompllish intended objective
appease
to satisfy, placate, calm, pacify
propitious
favorable indicative of favor, good results, or a happy outcome
rhetoric
using spoken or written communication to persuade; also used as a broad term or nonfiction
climax
arrangement of words, phrases, or clauses in an order of increasing importance.
politic
in best interest, wise, prudent, sensible
Deference
respectful submission or yielding to the judgment, opinion, will, etc., of another; respectful or courteous regard
collusion
(noun) Definition: a secret agreement, esp. for fraudulent or treacherous purposes. Synonyms: conspiracy.
Foreshadowing
the technique of suggesting or prefiguring a development in a literary work before it occurs.
Paramount
chief in importance, above all others
loose sentence
point is revealed at start
distinction
the recognizing or noting of differences; discrimination:
apostasy
deserting one's beliefs or one's faith (sometimes used metaphorically)
semiotic
of or relating to signs or symbols
ARGUMENT
form of persuasion that appeals to reason instead of emotion to convince an audience to think or act in a certain way.
leonine
relating to suggesting or resembling a lion
heroic couplet
two rhyming lines of iambic pentameter
Ambiguity
The multiple meanings of a word, phrase, sentence, or passage
geophysics
science treating of the forces that modify the earth
Parochial
describes people and outlooks that are narrow, restricted
esoteric
knowledge understood by or meant for only the select few who have special knowledge or interest; understood only by the select few; intended to be revealed only to the initiates of a group
perfunctory
performed merely as a routine duty; hasty and superficial:
Remonstrate (intransitive verb)
present and urge reasons in opposition, as to an act, measure, or any proceedings
irony
outcome that is the opposite of what is expected
Congeries
A heaping together and piling up of many words that have a similar meaning.
Ex. "This morning you have been rude, obnoxious, impolite, oafish."
idiom
an expression in a given language that cannot be understood from the literal meaning of the words in the expression; or, a regional speech or dialect
incalculable
not capable of being conceived of or determined; being beyond calculation; very great; unpredictable
clause
a group of words containing a subject and its verb that may or may not be a complete sentence
Abrogate
to abolish, do away with, or annul, especially by authority
setting
to put (something or someone) in a particular place:
oligarchy
n. a government in which the power is in the hands of only a few
elegy
a poetic lament upon the death of a particular person, usually ending in consolation
impasse
1.) a passage open only at one end; blind alley 2.) a situation with no escape
Pathos
part of a work of literature which is intended to bring out pity or sorrow from the reader. In rhetorical analysis, pathos represents emotional appeal.
pun
the humorous use of a word or phrase so as to emphasize or suggest its different meanings or applications, or the use of words that are alike or nearly alike in sound but different in meaning; a play on words.
point of view
the perspective from which a story is told
fiasco
a complete and ignominious failure.
moribund
in a dying state; near death.
ephemeral
lasting a very short time; short-lived; transitory:
flaccid
soft and limp; not firm; flabby:
lugubrious
mournful, dismal, or gloomy, esp. in an affected, exaggerated, or unrelieved manner:
latent
present but not visible, apparent, or actualized; existing as potential:
filch
steal
disparity
difference
clandestine
secret; undercover
specious
false, not genuine
Fanciful
Using the imagination
credulity
readinesss to believe
entity
something that exists independently
fecundity
(noun) fruitfulness or fertility
prognosticate
verb - to foretell
Bawdy
humorously coarse language or allusions
collioquialism
slang; informal or dialectical language
imperious
overbearing, arrogant; seeking to dominate; pressing, compelling
Procatalepsis
by anticipating an objection and answering it, permits an argument to continue moving forward while taking into account points or reasons opposing either the train of thought or its final conclusions. Often the objections are standard ones
Ex: It is usually argued at this point that if the government gets out of the mail delivery business, small towns like Podunk will not have any mail service. The answer to this can be found in the history of the Pony Express
Fait accompli
An accomplished and presumably irreversible deed or fact.
intimately
with great or especially intimate knowledge, Privately, personally, very closely
lethargic
deficient in alertness or activity, acting in an indifferent or slow, sluggish manner
Syntactic Permutation
Sentence structures that are extraordinarily complex and involved. They are often difficult for a reader to follow.
corpulent
excessively fat; The corpulent man loves eating.
Mood
The prevailing or dominant feeling of a work, scene, or event
prowess
skill pr expertise in a particular activity
Thesis ex
Frigthening assertion is correct what we love will ruin us.
Subversive
a radical supporter of political or social revolution
rhetorical modes
This flexible term describes the variety, the conventions, and the purposes of the major kinds of writing. The four most common rhetorical modes and their purposes are as follows: (1) The purpose of expositions (or expository writing) is to explain and analyze information by presenting an idea, relevant evidence, and appropriate discussion. The AP language exam essay questions are frequently expository topics. (2) The purpose of argumentation is to prove the validity of an idea, or point of view, by presenting sound reasoning, discussion, and argument that thoroughly convince the reader. Persuasive writing can be subjective. (4) The purpose of narration is to tell a story or narrate an event or series of events. This writing mode frequently uses tools of descriptive writing. These four writing modes are sometimes referred to as modes of discourse.
verbal irony
stating something but meaning the opposite
timorous
Timid by nature or revealing timidity, fearful
irreconcilable
impossible to bring into harmony or agreement
Subject
the subject matter of a conversation or discussion
congeal
v. to change from liquid to solid, thicken; to make inflexible or rigid syn: harden, jell, coagulate, solidify
Generic Conventions
features shown by texts that allow them to be put into a specific genre.
dicto simpliciter
an argument based on an unqualified generalization
exigency
the state or quality of requiring much effort or immediate action; pressing or urgent situation
subordinate clause
like all clauses, this word group contains both a subject and a verb, but unlike the independent clause, it cannot stand alone; also called dependent clause.
Lyric
A type of poetry that explores the poet's personal interpretation of and feelings about the world.
affinity
(n.) a natural liking or sympathy for; similarity
epanalepsis
Repetition at the end of a clause or sentence of the word or phrase with which it began.
a gambit(noun)
any maneuver by which one seeks to gain an advantage; Chess. an opening in which a player seeks to obtain some advantage by sacrificing a pawn or piece
to trifle with
to treat cavalierly, to use without respecting (to trifle with someone's feelings)
Iambic Pentameter
70% of verse is written this way; ten syllables per line, following an order of unaccedted-accented syllables
/ 229
Term:
Definition:
Definition:

Leave a Comment ({[ getComments().length ]})

Comments ({[ getComments().length ]})

{[comment.username]}

{[ comment.comment ]}

View All {[ getComments().length ]} Comments
Ask a homework question - tutors are online