AP ENGLISH VOCAB WORDS Flashcards

vocabulary
Terms Definitions
clandestine
secretive
Therm
Heat
belligerent
warring
amity
friendship
mendicant
a beggar
Hyper
Over, Above
perspicacious
wise, insightful
carrion
rotten flesh
destitution
complete poverty
Distraught
agitated, frantic, distracted
antipathy
hate, loathing, repugnance
post mortem
after death
fable
a weak point
haughty
blatantly and disdainfully proud
inveterate
firmly established, long-standing; habitual
florid
excessively decorated or embellished
erudite
scholarly, learnes, bookish, pedantic
presumptuous
(adj.) - disrespectfully bold
caravansory
an inn for caravans
abstract
not applied to actual objects
waffle
to speak or write evasively
Hyperbole
"overshooting" Bold overstatement or extravagant exaggeration of fact
Mock Epic
Parody of traditional epic.
interject
throw in between; insert; interpose
retribution
(n.) - vengeance, revenge, payback
English Sonnet Starting Rhyme Scheme
abab
berserk
violently or destructively frenzied; wild; crazed; deranged:
incumbent (upon)
required of you/expected of you
eclipse
to obscure or overshadow the importance of
inverterbrate
adj. firmly established by long continuance, habitual, chronic
elan
enthusiastic and assured vigor and liveliness
aphorism
statement or quote expressing a general truth or moral
assonance
repetition of vowel sounds within words
derived
copied or adapted from a source
Bruit
to spread news, reports, or unsubstantiated rumors
resistant to lawful authority; having the purpose of overthrowing an established government.
seditious.
impel
v. to drive or urge forward
prodigious
extraordinary in size, amount, extent, degree, force, etc.:
terse
neatly or effectively concise; brief and pithy, as language.
antonmasia
Substitution of a title, epithet, or descriptive phrase for a proper name (or of a personal name for a common name) to designate a member of a group or class
octave
the musical interval of eight full tones
inexorable
inflexible; not to be persuaded or moved
consonance
repetition, at close intervals, of the final consonants of accented syllables or important words, especially at the end of words (slither and lather)
insipid
lacking flavor; dull; not at all stimulating
archetype
a character or personality type found in every society
adventitious
resulting from chance rather that from an inherent cause or character; accidental, not essential;(medicine) acquired, not congental
Ostentatious
having to do with showing off; pretentious
euphemisms
the substitution of a mild, indirect, or vague expression for one thought to be offensive, harsh, or blunt
Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard
Thomas Gray
Alliteration
Repetition of the same sound beginning several words in sequence
plot
arrangement of the narration based on cause and effect relationship
any general character that holds a familiar place in popular culture
archetype
denotation
a word that names or signifies something specific:
Abscond
to leave in a hurry, especially to escape the law
simulation
the taking on of the appearance, form, or sound of something else; an imitation
oxymoron
a figure of speech consisting of two apparently contradictory terms
pseudonym
a false name or alias used by writer
didactic poetry
poetry with the primary purpose of teaching or preaching
Tawdry
gaudy; showy and cheap; low or mean; base
anastrophe
the inversion of the natural or usual word order
colloquial/colloquialism
The use of slang or informalities in speech or writing. Not generally acceptable for formal writing, colloquialisms give a work a conversational, familiar tone. Colloquial expressions in writing include local or regional dialects.
Malapropism
Malapropism is an act or habit of misusing words ridiculously, esp. by the confusion of words that are similar in sound.
apogee
the point in which the orbit of a heavenly body or artificially satelite farthest from the earth
narrative devices
methods the author uses to help convey the message of his/her piece
Pun
Usually humorous use of a word in such a way to suggest 2 meanings
loose sentence
a long sentence that starts with its main clause, which is followed by several dependent clauses and modifying phrases. For example, "the child ran, frenzied and ignoring all hazards, as if being chased by demons."
begging the question
assuming something to be true that really needs proof
D. Phrase "dull chafe" interprets as
unvaried rituals of winter life
deus ex machina
(in ancient Greek and Roman drama) a god introduced into a play to resolve the entanglements of the plot.
diadem
crown
Parable
Allegory
compunction
anxiety
dalliance
flirtatious play
farcical
absurd; ludicrous
endosmosis
osmosis inward
obsequious
excessively submissive
apropos
appropriate, opprotune, prelevantly
diurnal
active by day
EQUIVOCAL
(adj.) doubtful; ambiguous
ENERVATE
(v) to weaken
fettle
condition or state
Assertion
a declaration or statement
righteous
morally correct or virtuous
Virulent
extremely poisonous or injurious
parallelism
parallel construction of structure
benign
gentle, kind, harmless, benevolent
affectation
unnatural trait or appearance
eccentric
departing from a recognized, conventional, or established norm or pattern; odd;
unconventional
iniquity
an evil or wicked act
titular
being such in name only
turgid
swollen, excessively embellished in style or language
context
circumstances of a situation; environment
apostrophe
addressing someone or something, usually not present, as though present
Spenserian
interlocking rhyme scheme
abab bcbc cdcd ee
fruition
attainment of anything desired; realization; accomplishment:
tautology
needless repetition which adds no meaning or understanding
motif
A recurring theme, subject or idea
magnaminous
noble and generous, especially in forgiving; not petty
quatrain
a poetic stanza of four lines
languish
to become weak, listless, or depressed
exogenous
Developing or originating from an outside source
Thomas Hardy
heart buried separately from body
telepathic
(adj.) - capable of reading minds
irony
incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs
depravity
the moral state of corruption, wickedness
candid
free from reservation, disguise, or subterfuge; straightforward:
Epic
An extended narrative poem in elevated or dignified language, celebrating the feats of a legendary or traditional hero
(Legend tells of a legendary warrior whose kung fu skills were the stuff of legend;
I AM BEOWULF)
Persona
the fictional voice that a writer adopts to tell a story, e.g. Mark Twain for Samuel Clemens
vernacular
the everyday speech of a particular country or region, often involving nonstandard usage
austere
strict, severe; simple, plain; sour in flavor
Humanism
A belief that emphasizes faith and optimism in human potential and humanity.
Metaphor
a direct comparison of two different things
ambiguity
multiple meanings a literary work may communicate, especially two meanings that are incompatible
Interior Monologue
writing that records the conversation that occurs inside a character's head
colloquial/ism
an informal or conversational use of language
Extended Parallelism
repetition of words for gramatical elements.
Onomatopoeia
word that imitates the sound it represents.
circumlocution
a roundabout or indirect way of speaking; the use of more words than necessary to express an idea.
philanthropy
n. good will towards all people, love of mankind, act of generosity
Protagonist
the principal character in a work of fiction
fantasy
a sotry that concerns an unresal world or contains unreal characters a fantasy may be merely whimsical or it may present a serious point.
Ingratiate
v. to win confidence or good graces for oneself
extended metaphor
a series of comparisons between two inlike objects
anaphora
a device of repitition in which the same expression is repeated at the beginning of two or more lines, clauses, or sentences.
Satire
The literary art of ridiculing a folly or vice in order to expose or correct it. The object of satire is usually some human frailty; people, institutions, ideas, and things are all fair game for satirists. Satire evokes attitudes of amusement, contempt, scorn, or indignation toward its faulty subject in the hope of somehow improving it.
either/or fallacy
requires absolutes which do not allow for intermediate causes. "do you want to go to college or dig ditches all your life?"
disparagingly
speaking slightingly of, in a way to undervalue and discredit
syntax
the study of the rules for the formation of grammatical sentences in a language.
devices of sound
techniques of deploying the sound of words, especially in poetry; metrical terms; creating a general effect or of discordant sound, imitating another sound, or reflecting a meaning
Chiasmus
a figure of speech by which the order of the terms in the first of two parallel clauses is reversed in the second. eg. "Pleasure's a sin, and sometimes sin's a pleasure" --Byron
Bildungsroman
A novel or story whose theme is the moral or psychological growth of the main character.
framing and reframing
refers to way an argument is presented (looks at positive and negative aspects)
to feather ones nest
to grow rich by taking advantage of circumstances
ephemeral
short-lived
informal
conversational
duplicity
double dealing
Indispensable
Absolutely needed
prosaic
commonplace; dull
disavow
to deny responsibility
abstemious
moderate in food/ drink
Invective
a direct verbal assault
bombast
pretentious exaggeratedly learned language
germane
relevant, pertinent, related to
ethos
(anthropology) the distinctive spirit of a culture or an era
malevolent
wanting harm to befall otehrs
Fabricated
made or concocted to deceive
antithesis
The direct or exact opposite
adjourn
to break up; to recess
tepid
Lukewarm; unenthusiastic, marked by an absence of interest
flashback
retrospection, where an earlier event is inserted into the normal chronology of the narrative
Pathos
That which induces an emotional response; the root word of sympathy, empathy, apathy, antipathy, etc.
microcosm
a little world; world in miniature
auspicious
adj - promising future success; favourable
impalpable/intangible
not able to be physically touched
Antagonist
the character that the main character (protagonist) struggles against
style
a way of expressing something (in language or art or music etc.) that is characteristic of a particular person or group of people or period
Imagery
a word or phrase representing that which can be seen, touched, tasted, smelled, or felt
rhetorical appeal
logos (facts) ethos (credibility) and pathos (emotion)
bellicose
having or showing a ready disposition to fight
gambit
in chess, an opening move that involves risk or sacrifice of a minor piece in order to gain a later advantage; any opening move of this type
Sarcasm
harsh, caustic personal remarks to or about someone; less subtle than irony
surplus(noun)
a quantity much larger than is needed
Implicit
To say or write something that suggests and implies but never says it directly or clearly.
allusion
a passing or casual reference; an incidental mention of something, either directly or by implication: an allusion to Shakespeare.
Climax
the point of highest interest in a literary work
monolith
a single large stone, often in the form of a column or monument
Lyric
A short poem (often only 12 lines long) Usually has no plot or chronology of events Expresses the feelings, perceptions, and thoughts of the speaker Very personal, emotional, or subjective。Example: Dadist poem
Hubris
Aristotle's term for the pride of the tragic hero that leads him to ignore or overlook warnings of impending disaster or to break moral laws.
When Oedipus is born, his father exiles him but the child returns as an adult and kills Laius, not recognizing him as his father. King Laius invited catastrophe by attempting to circumvent Apollo's prophecy. The King's actions revealed his hubris because he, a mortal, thought he knew more than Apollo, a god.
Interloper-verb
to thrust oneself into the affairs of others-Microsoft thought GNU/LINUX as a new interloper, who was stealing away the Desktop market.
Irrelevant Conclusions
Not based on the assertion amd evidence.
apathetic
having or showing little or no feeling or emotion; spiritless
Soliloquy
A speech in which a character who is alone speaks his or her thoughts aloud.
Paen
(noun) a song or hymn of praise and thanksgiving
stultify
verb - 1 to make someone or something appear absurd, foolish, contradictory, etc. 2 to cause something to be useless, worthless, futile, etc. 3 to dull the mind of someone, eg with tedious tasks
selection of details
The choice of details to lead the reader in a thought pattern.
loose sentence/non-periodic sentence
a type of sentence in which the main idea comes first, followed by dependent grammatical units such as phrases and clauses.
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