AP English Vocabulary Flashcards

Terms Definitions
Pugnacious
Combative
antithesis
opposite
expeditiously
rapidly
diffident
shy
repulse
drive back
abject
degraded, miserable
suborn
bribe, induce
pontificate
self righteous
alias
assumed name
dictatorial
domineering; oppressively overbearing
Capt
Take, Hold, Seize
cid, cis
cut; kill
censure
to criticize sharply
acuity
sharpness; acuteness; keenness:
Importune
beg persistently and urgently
garner
to gather and store
maudlin
effusively or insincerely emotional
abduct
(v.) - to kidnap
Simile
Using "like" or "as"
puerile
adjective
displaying or suggesting a lack of maturity
synonym: childish
theoretical
of conclusions reached through logic
qualitative
relies on nonnumerical criteria supported by reason and logic
INNOVATE
(v) to make changes; modernize
Euphenism
More acceptable way of phrasing
mandatory
(adj.) - required, not optional
titular
adj, existing in title only
surreal
having the disorienting, hallucinatory quality of a dream; unreal; fantastic:
expressionism
a writing approach, process, or technique in which a writer depicts a character's feelings about a subject rather than the objective surface reality of the subject. The writer presents his interpretation of what he sees.
quiescence
a state of inactivity or dormancy
paradox
a statement that seems contradictory but contains a truth or valid deduction
tone
a writers attitude towards their subject, characters, or audience
Rhetorical
Persuasive; a style, form, and approach intended to persuade.
sagacity
acuteness of mental discernment and soundness of judgment
personification
representing an abstract quality or idea as a person or creature
Understatement
When an author assigns less significance to an event or thing than it deserves, the result is a(n) _____________________. For example, if a writer refers to a very destructive monsoon as "a bit of wind," the power of the event is being deliberately ___________________.
machination
a crafty, scheming, or underhanded action designed to accomplish some (usually evil) end
spondee
a metrical unit with stressed-stressed syllables
Doppelganger
ghostly double of another character, especially if it haunts its counterpart - a doppelganger, in german, means "double walker" - it's like a carbon copy of a character with a different soul. However, one of the criteria for a doppelganger isn't that it looks like its counterpart. Frankenstein and his monster are considered to be doppelgangers.
unwieldily
not wieldy; wielded with difficulty; not readily handled or managed in use or action, as from size, shape, or weight; awkward; ungainly.
First Person
Narrator is the character (I,Me, We)
acquiesce
to agree or consent quietly without protest, but without enthusiasm
asyndeton
commas used with no conjunction to separate a series of words (X,Y, Z as opposed to X, Y, and Z)
Archetype
A detail, image, or character type that occurs frequently in literature and myth and is thought to appeal in a universal way to the unconscious and to evoke a response
epigram
a concise but ingenious, witty, and thoughtful statement
Assonance
a repitition of identical or similar vowel sounds, usually those found in stressed syllables of close proximity.
placid
(adj) having an undisturbed surface or aspect; outwardly calm or composed; self-satisfied
hyerbole
a fugure of speech using deliberate exaggeration or overstatement
straitlaced
extremely strict in regard to moral standards and conduct, prudish
maxim
a saying or proverb expressing common wisdom or truth
Fact
something that is believed to have objective reality, a piece of information regarded as verifiable
Terse
adjective. sparing in the use of words; abrupt
Diction
n. verbal description, choice of words especially with regard to correctness, clearness, or effectiveness
superlative
of the highest kind, quality, or order; surpassing all else or others; supreme; extreme:
pathos
an appeal to the emotions of the audience
connotation
the implied meaning of a word, in contrast to its directly expressed "dictionary meaning"
invocation
epic poets call upon a goddess for divine inspiration in composing
partisan
a fervent supporter of a cause or person; devoted to or biased in favor of a party, cause or group
Definition
a clear explanation of the meaning of a word or phrase
verbiage
n. language that is too wordy or inflated in proportion to the sense or content, wordiness; a manner of expression
didactic
writing or speech is didactic when it has an instructive purpose or a lesson. It is often associated with a dry, pompous presentation, regardless of its innate value to the reader.
Attitude
the sense expressed by the tone of voice or the mood of a piece of writing; the author's feelings toward his or her subject, characters, events, or theme. It might even be his or her feelings for the reader
Cadence
n. a rhythmic sequence or flow of sounds in language
Red herring
When a writer raises an irrelevant issue to draw attention away from the real issue
ambiguity
expression of an idea in such a way that suggests more than one meaning
Microcosm
man or human nature that is an epitome of the world or the universe.
What are the 6 Human Qualities
Sympathy; Empathy; Trust; Morality; Humility & Forgivness
Terms to KnowLogos
Logos is appeal based on logic or reason. Documents distributed by companies or corporations are logos-driven. Scholarly documents are also often logos-driven.
impiety
undutifulness
furtive
secret
epiphany
revelation
syn
together
commingle
(v) mix
Sarcasm
sneering criticism
careen
to swerve
dearth
scarce supply
acme
peak, highest point
EMBELLISH
(v) to adorn
RENOUNCE
(v) to abandon
Tantamount
equivalent in value
juxtaposition
side by side comparison
weak specification
imprecise, abstract language
gesticulating
making gestures while speaking
Succor
help; relief; aid; assistance
epistroophe
ending with same word(s)
CUPIDITY
 inordinate desire for wealth
Pusillanimous
timid or cowardly; not brave
Anomalous
abnormal, irregular, departing from the usual
pun
a humorous play on words
zeugma
a grammatically correct construction in which a word, usually a verb or adjective, is applied to two or more nouns without being repeated: "the thief took my wallet and the Fifth Avenue bus."
Derivative
unoriginal; taken from something already existing
conceit
controlling metaphor throughout a poem
rapacious
excessively greedy; taking by force
candid
frank; outspoken; open and sincere:
deride
to laugh at in scorn; mock
colloquialism
speech from the moment, simple conversation
exegesis
a a detailed analysis or interpretation of a work of prose or poetry
turgid
swollen as from a fluid; bloated
abyss
n. enormous chasm; vast bottomless pit
Sacrilege
Improper or disrespectful treatment of something held sacred
sagacious
(adj.) - shrewd, showing sound judgment
simulacrum
a slight, unreal, or superficial likeness or semblance; an effigy, image, or representation
allusion
direct or indirect reference to something which is presumably known
Inversion
subject first, then verb, then complement; the element that is first is emphasized
cherubic
having a sweet nature befitting an ANGEL
lyric
a song-like poem that express the thoughts or feelings of someone
Informal/Low diction
Language of everyday use. Relaxed, conversational, and common.
sestina
a highly structured poem consisting of six six- line stanzas followed by a tercet; the same set of six words end the lines of each of the six-line stanzas, but in a different order each time
clause
a grammatical unit that contains both a subject and a verb. There are independent, or main, clauses which can stand alone as a sentence, and there are subordinate (dependent) clauses which must be accompanied by an independent clause.
Parallelism
a literary technique that relies on the use of the same syntactical structures (phrases, clauses, sentences) in a series in order to develop an argument or create emphasis.
Metonymy
______________ is a figure of speech in which something is referred to by using the name of something that is associated with it. For example, a crown is associated with royalty, and is often used as a metonym for royal authority. ("The edict issued today by the Crown forbids grazing in the commons.")
Acclamation
(n.) a shout of welcome; an overwhelming verbal vote of approval
revile
to attack with abusive language; to call insulting names
Syllogism
a deductive system of formal logic that presents two premises (major, minor, conclusion)
nominal
being such in name only; so-called; putative:
Image
A word or words, either figurative or literal, used to describe a sensory experience or an object perceived by the sense. Always a concrete representation.
satire
mocking or cynical for the purpose of exposing a fault or trait
hyperbole
a figure of speech that uses an incredible exaggeration or overstatement for effect
formal diction
language that is lofty, dignified, and impersonal
onomatopoeia
a figure of speech in which natural sounds are imitated in the sounds or words, such as buzz, hiss, hum.
End rhyme
rhyme at the end of a line
trochaic
a foot in poetry with one strusses syllable followed by aon unstresses syllable
Apposition
a grammar construction in which a noun is placed with another as an explanation Stephanie Grant, a senior, likes to read.
impinge
to make an impression; have an effect or impact (usually fol. by on or upon):
Ensue
to come after; to happen as a result of
climactic order
the order in which items are arranged in sequence according to their importance, with the most important one last
rhetorical question
one that does not expect an explicit answer. It is used to pose an idea to be considered by the speaker or audience.
hasty or sweeping generalization
jumping to a conclusion, conclusion reached on basis of too little evedince
Dray (n.)
A low, heavy cart without sides, used for haulage
epistolary novel
a novel in letter form written by one or more characters
metaphor
a figure of speech in which a term or phrase is applied to something to which it is not literally applicable in order to suggest a resemblance, as in "A mighty fortress is our God."
chary
weary
idiom
colloquialism
impartial
unbiased
adjective
Inimical
abate
to reduce
description
describing imagery
calcimined
white washed
histrionic
excessively dramatic
Anthrop (root)
human being
impassive
devoid of emotion
AUSTERITY
(n) sternness; severity
rotound
rounded and plump
chastise
v. to criticize severely
ABSTRACT (ADJ)
THEORETICAL; COMPLEX, DIFFICULT
conductive
producing a favorable outcome/helpful
Iambic
metrical foot: unstressed, stressed
CONDONE
to pardon or overlook
contiguity
sharing a boundary or edge
Demur
to protest, to object to
virulent
extremely poisonous; malignant; full of hate
factotum
person who does many jobs
ribald
crude; offensive (usually with humor)
dossier
a record; documents (background information)
macabre
gruesome and horrifying; ghastly; horrible.
tenuous
thin, slender, not dense; lacking clarity or sharpness; of slight importance or significance; lacking a sound basis, poorly supported
stoic
adj. showing indifference to pain, apathetic
alliteration
the repetition of initial consonant sounds
mood
the emotional tone or prevailing atmosphere in a work of literature or other discourse. in grammar, it refers to the intent of a particular sentence
egalitarian
characterized by belief in equal political, economic, social, and civil rights for all people
Arrogate
To claim or take without right
savor
(v.) - to appreciate fully, enjoy
irony
incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs
hedonism
the doctrine that pleasure or happiness is the highest good.
Epic
An extended narrative poem in elevated or dignified language, celebrating the feats of a legendary or traditional hero
(Legend tells of a legendary warrior whose kung fu skills were the stuff of legend;
I AM BEOWULF)
contentious
having or showing a ready disposition to fight; controversy
scholarly
of or suitable to a learned person
tercet
three lines of poetry which usually rhyme
villanelle
a verse form consisting of nineteen lines divided into six stanzas- five tercets and one quatrain; the first and third line of the first tercet rhyme. and this rhyme is repeated through each of the next four tercets and in the last two lines of the concluding quatrain
ethos
persuasive appeal to character used by speakers and writers to demonstrate that they are credible and trustworthy
transience
the attribute of being brief or fleeting
maverick
one who is independent and resists adherence to a group
perennials
lasting for an indefinitely long time; enduring., A flowering plant that lives for many years.
Anecdote
A brief recounting of a relevant episode
mock epic
a parody of traditional epic from
Hyperbaton
Hyperbaton An inversion of normal word order. A generic term for a variety of figures involving transposition (see below), it is sometimes synonymous with anastrophe.
invective
an insulting or abusive word or expression.
Epigraph
the use of a quotation at the beginning of a work that hints at its theme. Hemingway begins The Sun Also Rises with two epigraphs. One of them is "You are all a lost generation" by Gertrude Stein.
protagonist
the central character in a stroy the one who initiates or drives the action
metaphysical poetry
17th century England, John Donne, Ben Johnson, (like English version of beat poets) express honesty, complexity, contradiction on life, intellectual, analytical, bold, physical love, religion
Inductive Reasoning
Using specific examples to reach a general conclusion.
Contraction
The combination of two words into one by eliminating one or more sounds and indicating the omission with an apostrophe.
permanence
the property of being able to exist for an indefinite duration.
repetition
a device in which words, sounds, and ideas are used more than once to enhance rhythm and create emphasis
Blank Verse
unrhymed poetry that has a regular rhythm and line length, especially iambic pentameter
expose
a public exposure or revelation, as of something discreditable:
panoply
a splendid or striking array, as in a panoply of colorful flags
Motif
main theme or subject of a work that is elaborated on in the development of the piece: a repeated pattern or idea
juxtapose/juxtaposition
to place two things side by side for the purpose of contrasting the two or highlithing one
Torrent (n.)
1.a stream of water flowing with great rapidity and violence. 2.a rushing, violent, or abundant and unceasing stream of anything. 3.a violent downpour of rain. 4.a violent, tumultuous, or overwhelming flow
feminine rhyme
a rhyme of two or more syllables with the stress falling on a syllable other than the last
loose sentence
a sentence that does not end with the completion of its main clause, but continues with one or more subordinate clauses or other modifiers.
tempestuous
stormy
Wan
melancholy
distaff
female
insurrection
rebellion
nebulous
hazy, vague
mutinous
rebellious, unruly
antipathy
aversion; dislike
Pedantic
ostentatiously learned
logos
appeals to logic
pragmatic
practical, favoring utility
INTREPID
(adj.) fearless; bold
HAUGHTINESS
(n) pride; arrogance
Misleading Statistic
vague statistics
Coup
A brilliantly executed plan
writhe
to twist or contort
appall
to terrify; to shock
Vituperative
harshly abusive, severely scolding
ersatz
synthetic, artificial, inferior quality
impede
to obstruct or hinder
abomination
anything shamefully disgusting or vile; polluted, sinful wickedness
ubiquitous
being present everywhere at once
florid
describing flowery or elaborate speech
esoteric
understood by a few; confidental
profound
having great depth or seriousness
Prestidigitator
magicians, especially those practicing sleight of hand, can make things appear and disappear at will, can be used to indicate great or surprising skill
sonetto
italian word-"little sound or song"
imperative
absolutely necessary or required; unavoidable:
persona
the narrator of a lietrary work
procatalepsis
by anticipating an objection and answering it, permits an argument to continue moving forward while taking into account points or reasons opposing either the train of thought or its final conclusions.
Litotes
An intentional understatement of a word
edify
to enlighten; to instruct, especially in moral or religious matters
isocolon
Parallel structure in which the parallel elements are similar not only in grammatical structure, but also in length. For example. "An envious heart makes a treacherous ear ("Their Eyes Were Watching God," Zora Neale Hurston).
physician
knows medicine and astrology very well. fond of gold. makes a lot of money from the plague
conduit
(n.) - a pipe, passage, channel
libertine
one who acts without moral restraint
remonstrance
objection; reproof; protest against an idea
colloquial
characteristic of or appropriate to ordinary or familiar conversation rather than formal speech or writing; informal.
hegemony
the predominant influence, as of a state, region, or group, over another or others
Angst
an acute but unspecific feeling of anxiety
denotative language
the literal, dictionary definition of a word, emphasizing an objective tone
limerick
light verse consisting of five lines of regular rhythm in which the first, second, and fifth lines (each consisting of three feet) rhyme and the second and third lines (each consisting of two feet) rhyme
punctilious
very careful and exact, (attentive to fine point of etiquette,) fussy
ascetic
strict sacrifice of one's desires for personal discipline
asceticism
(n) Rigorous self-denial to obtain a high spiritual and moral state
ad hominem
attacks integrity or character of opponent
purpose
one's intention or objective in a speech or piece of writing
Charlatan
Quack; a person who pretends to be something they're not, usually for profit or gain
eschew
to keep away from to avoid to shun
anapest
a metric foot of poetry (short, short, long)
subordinate clause
cannot stand alone, it does not express a complete thought
insidious
proceeding in a gradual way but with harmful effects
supine
lying flat on one's back; listless or lethargic; apathetic or passive
ad vericundiam
an appeal to general authority. "my teacher says...." "it says so in the bible"
dramatic irony
(theater) irony that occurs when the meaning of the situation is understood by the audience but not by the characters in the play
tine
a sharp, projecting point or prong, as of a fork.
Ameliorate
To make or become better (in terms of emotion)
eponymous
A term for the title character of a work or literature.
chicanery
the use of clever talk or trickery to deceive or evade
In medias res
"in the midst of things"; the technique of opening a story in the middle of the action and filling in past details by exposition or flashback
periodic sentence
makes sense fully only when the end of sentence is reached
Cumulative sentence (loose sentence)
a sentence in which the main indepent clause is elaborated by the successive addition of modifying clauses or phrases. (Jonathon Swift, A Modest Proposal: "I have been assured by a very knowing American friend of my acquaintance in London, that a young healthy child well nursed is at a year old a most delicious, nourishing, and wholesome food, whether stewed, roasted, baked or boiled; and I make no doubt that it will equally serve in a fricassee or a ragout")
Mal
Bad
lackey
servant
ostentatious
showy
wary
on guard
commodious
roomy/ spacious
quotidian
daily everyday
Temerity
reckless boldness
Venerated
highly respected
Ruse
a crafty Trick
Assiduous
hardworking, busy, dilligent.
sacrosant
sacred and holy
indigent
very poor, impoverished
fallow
dormant; idle; inactive
sable
black or dark brown
Disingenuous
not straightforward or candid
wanton
malicious; unjustifiable; unprovoked; egregious
camaraderie
good will between friends
ascend
to rise or climb
reticent
inclined to keep silent; reserved
Transitory
lasting a very short time
APERTURE
(n) an opening; a hole
mendacity
dishonesty, the act of lying
cryptic
mysterious in meaning; puzzling; ambiguous:
Parenthetifcal
a comment that interrupts the immediate subject, often to qualify or explain
rebuttal
final opposition to an assertion; disprove, repute
revere
to honor, to regard with respect
Jargon
the specialized language or vocabulary of a particular group or profession
RENAISSANCE
(n) rebirth, revival (Euro 14th-16th cent)
adulation
praise or flattery that is excessive
simple sentence
independent sentence. subject and verb.
augur
one who foretells events by omens
blight
the rapid and extensive discoloration, wilting, and death of plant tissues.
raconteur
a person who tells stories and anecdotes with great skill
Euphemism
an indirect, less offensive way of saying something that is considered unpleasant
loose
a sentence which expresses the subject and predicate near the beginning and adds modifying elements at the end
Aside
A short comment directed to the audience
discord
lack of agreement or harmony; strife; tension
Complex sentence
A sentence that includes one independent clause and at least one dependent clause
Black Humor
Use of disturbing themes in comedy.
Sybarite
a person devoted to luxury and pleasure
amorphous
having no definite form or distinct shape
sate
(v.) - to satisfy (an appetite) fully.
Connoisseur (n.)


1. A person with expert knowledge or training, especially in the fine arts. 2. A person of informed and discriminating taste
apollonian
having the properties of or preferring classic beauty.
nomenclature
technical names or naming system in an art or science
inverted syntax
a sentence constructed so that the predicate comes before the subject (ex: In the woods I am walking.)
rhetoric
the use of spoken or written language to exert a particular effect on an audience
Secular
of or pertaining to worldly things or to things that are not regarded as religious, spiritual, or sacred; temporal; not pertaining to or connected with religion; concerned with nonreligious subjects; not belonging to a religious order; not bound by monastic vows; occurring or celebrated once in an age or century; going on from age to age; continuing through long ages; a layperson; one of the secular clergy
Colloquial Language
Slang or common language that is informal
apostrophe
a figure of speech in which one directly addresses an absent or imaginary person, or some abstraction
exhume
to revive or restore after neglect or a period of forgetting; bring to light
abscond
to depart in a sudden and secret manner, esp. to avoid capture and legal prosecution:
Static Character
a character who does not change during the story.
anaphora
repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of successive phrases
persuasion
a type of argument that has as its goal an action on the part of the audience
Savoir-faire
[French] The ability to SAY AND DO THE RIGHT THING IN ANY SITUATION; COURTEOUS; Adroitness; Fact.
Synecdoche
Figure of speech in which a part of an object is used to represent the whole.
Example: "All hands on deck" for "all sailors/men on deck."
AB AB CD CD EF EF GG
rhyme pattern of a sonnet
zealous
enthusiastic
pro
forward
Detrimental
harmful
predatory
victimizing; pillaging
gamut
full range
fortitude
courage, strength
enhance
improve, augment
systemic
extensive, comprehensive
Degenerate
a corrupt wrongdoer
Refulgent
Shining, radiant, resplendent
bemused
entertained by confusion
CITE
to give credit
dissolute
given to improper conduct
rancorous
showing deep-seated resentment, bitter, hateful
BLASPHEMY
(n) cursing; irreverence, sacrilege
INGENUOUS
(adj.) naïve; young; unsophisticated
venerate
to honor, to revere
abnegate
to relinquish; give up.
crone
an ugly, withered old woman
patronizing
treating in a condescending manner
retinue
the attendants accompanying a high-ranking person
TORTUOUS
(adj.) winding or twisting; devious
iniquity
immoral or grossly unfair behavior
exhilarate
to thrill, to excite greatly
absolute
free from imperfection; complete; perfect:
interlocutor
someone who participates in a conversation
lyrical prose
personal, reflective prose that reveals the speaker's thoughts and feelings about the subject
Anastrophe
Inversion or reversal or the traditional order of words.
aphorism
short statement which expresses a general truth or a moral principal
convivial
(adj) festive, sociable, having fun together,genial
omniscient narrator
an all-knowing, usually third-person narrator
Denotation
 
standard dictionary meaning of a word
morbid
suggesting an unhealthy mental state or attitude; unwholesomely gloomy, sensitive, extreme, etc.:
assuage
to satisfy, to lessen the intensity of
Decided/Biased
Those who have formed tightly held opinions.
introspective
The quality of examining one's own mind or thoughts
farce
a comedy that contains an extravagant and nonsensical disregard of seriousness, although it may have a serious, scornful purpose
Chiasmus
A statement consisting of two parallel parts in which the second part is structurally reversed
structure
the organization and form of a work.
End- stop rhyme
punctuation at end of rhyme
lassitude
weariness of body or mind from strain
Epitaph
an inscription on a tombstone or monument; he was a brave soul
Exposition
The explanation or analysis of a subject; presenting the meaning or purpose of an issue.
incendiary
used or adapted for setting property on fire:
connected
to join, link, or fasten together; unite or bind:
shrew
a woman with a violent or nagging temperament
Ambiquity
The presence of two or more possible meanings in any passage
ode
a lyric poem that is somewhat serious in subject and treatment, elevated in style and sometimes use elaborate stanza structure, which is often patterned in sets of three
extended metaphor
a metaphor that is developed over several lines of writing
Drama
is the form of literature known as plays; but drama also refers to the type of serious play that is often concerned with the leading character's relationship to society.
mars
to damage or spoil to a certain extent; render less perfect, attractive, useful, etc.; impair or spoil:
morass
(n.) a patch of low, soft, wet ground; a swamp. (SYN) bog, quagmire (ANT) solid ground, bedrock, terra firma
begging the question
the conclusion that the writer should prove is validated within the claim; a circle kind of argument
Example: "You're not allowed to go out." "Why?" "Because you're not allowed to go out."
Example: The father of American poetry Walt Whitman is a favorite writer in American history.
Flashback
a device in the narrative of a motion picture, novel, etc., by which an event or scene taking place before the present time in the narrative is inserted into the chronological structure of the work.
Present participles
end in -ing, used as an adjective or adverb.
First Person Point of View
One of the characters tells the story
analogy
similarity
convoluted
intricate/complicated
trite
cliche; overused;banal
affluent
rich, well-off
synthesis
combination of parts
beguiling
(adj) charming or fascinating
splenetic
adj - bad-tempered; spiteful
qualify
v. to make more specific
Awry
away from the correct course
admonishing
Gently warning or gently scolding
Abrogate
To cancel, destroy, revoke or void.
conscientious
characterized by extreme care and great effort, guided by or in accordance with conscience or sense of right and wrong
prosaic
not fanciful or imaginative, dull, lacking in distinction and originality; matter-of-fact, straightforward; characteristic of prose, not poetic
Oxymoron
conjoining contradictory terms (as in 'deafening silence') Example: How is it possible to have a Civil War?
Bias
A preference. Example: "The Dalles Cowboys play football the best."
Object
receives the action and usually follows the verb. Ex. He ate THE CAKE.
Aporia
expresses doubt about an idea or conclusion. Among its several uses are the suggesting of alternatives without making a commitment to either or any
Ex: I am not sure whether to side with those who say that higher taxes reduce inflation or with those who say that higher taxes increase inflation.
obfuscate
to render; obscure; unclear, to make confusing
syntax
the grammatical structure of prose and poetry
dystopia
an imaginary place where people live dehumanized, often fearful lives; opposite of utopia
trajectory
a path through space, literal or physical
Irony/Ironic
a mode of expression in which the intended meaning is the opposite of what is stated
cumulative sentence
Sentence that begins with the main idea and adds additional information, usually for description.
disquisition
(n) a formal discourse or treatise in which a subject is examined and discussed; dissertation
independent clause
expresses as a complete thought and can stand alone as a sentence.
sacrosanct
(adj.) (esp. of a principe, place, or routine) regarded as too important or valuable to be interfered with; sacred
APPEAL TO NUMBERS
fallacy occurs any time the sheer numbers of people who agree to something is used as a reason to get you to agree to it
narratio
The part of an argument in which a speaker or writer provides a narrative account of what has happened and explains the nature of the case.
private sector(noun)
the part of the economy that involves the transactions of individuals and businesses
to exonerate
to free or clear from blame or guilt
Point of View
the perspective from which a story is told
/ 397
Term:
Definition:
Definition:

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