Poetry Poetry Terms Flashcards

Terms Definitions
Mirror
Plath
visual
sight
Eight Feet
Octometer
antithesis
direct contrast/opposition
spondee
stressed, stressed
virtue
goodness; righteousness
monometer
one foot
Blank verse
unrhymed verse
trimeter
3 feet meter
adjure
to appeal to
denotation
the dictionary meaning
elegy
poem lamenting someone
assonance
resemblance of sounds.
metaphor
implied or direct comparison
Sestet
a six line stanza
rhyme scheme
pattern of rhyme
quatrain
a four line stanza
four line stanza, ABCB
ballad
onomatopoeia
words that imitate sounds
masculine rime
one syllable rimes
couplet
a pair of rhymed lines
Vino, primero, pura
Juan Ramon Jimenez/Espana
Trochaic
stressed, unstressed
type of metric foot
pun
a humorous play on words
Conceit
An elaborate and complicated metaphor.
southbound on the freeway
mary swenson
hyperbole
obvious exaggeration used for effect
meter
recognizable rhythm through varying pattern of stressed syllables alternating with syllables of less stress
speaker
a narrator off a poem
cacophony
harsh discordance of sound; dissonance:
Sonnet
Fourteen-line lyric poem that is usually written in iambic pentameter and that has one of several rhyme schemes.
epic
lengthy narrative poem, heoric deeds, lofty and grand
mood
the atmosphere, overall feeling, or emotional state created by the writing.
Paradox
a statement or situation containing apparently contradictory or incompatible elements
alliteration
repetiton of sounds, usually first letters of consonants
symbol
anything that stands for something else
Simile
a comparison between two different things or ideas; figure of speech stating a likeness between two unlike things, usually with words such as like or seems EX. like, as
consonance
repetition of consonants in close words
Personification
When poets give human characteristics to nature, or things
Imagery
language that appieals to the senses
As I Walked Out One Evening
Auden
irony
a contradiction of expectation between what is said an what is meant
autobiographical
concerning a self told life story
Abstract
Refers to language that describes concepts rather then concrete images. e.g. The idea of freedom
figurative language
language that communicates ideas beyond the literal meanings of words
Politics
by W. B. Yeats1938Recusatio\"How can I, that girl standing there, my attention fix On Roman or on Russian Or on Spanish politics\"
Form
the arrangement or pattern of the poem; the placing and grouping of lines
diction and syntax
word choice and word order
Vachel Lindsay
"A Net to Snare the Moonlight"
haiku
Japanese poem about nature 3 lines; syllables= 5, 7, 5
metonymy
a closely related term substituted for an object or idea
Understatement
emphasizing an idea in a restrained way, opposite of hyperbole
accentual-syllabic
metric system based on stress and length of feet
Genre
A category of literature using a particular form, technique, style or subject.
allusion
a referance to previous literature or history
Ode
complex and often lengthy lyric poem written in a dignified formal style on a lofty or serious subject; often written for special occasion to honor person or commemorate event. it is profound treatment of a profound subject. no set form to this type of poem
Dialect
The unique pronunciation of words that occur in specific geographical regions or classes.
situational irony
expect something but the opposite occurs
implied metaphor
implies comparison between two things without using "is".
Shakespearean Sonnet
A fourteen-line poem in iambic pentameter with three quatrains and a couplet and the rhyme scheme abab cdcd efef gg.
rhyme
words that end in the same sound
scansion
the analysis of metrical patterns of verse
rhythm
the pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables in a line of poetry
sarcasm
A form of verbal irony; saying something and meaning the exact opposite, with the intent to be witty or insulting
odes
short poems written with grace, charm, and precision of language.
expresses careful thought
education was only for the wealthy and privileged
symbolism
the practice of representing things by symbols, or of investing things with a symbolic meaning or character.
hero
the main character in a literary work, typically one whose character or deeds inspire the admiration of the reader
concrete poetry
a poem whose shape suggests the subject
sound devices
elements such as rhyme rhythm and alliteration and onomatopoeia that give poetry a musical quality
ballad
song like poem that tells a story about romance and adventure
Caesura
A short but definite pause used for effect within a line of poetry.
imperfect rhyme
involves words that sound similar, but are not exactly the same, approx. or slant rhyme
nontraditional poetry
does away with regular rhyme and rhythm, although it is usually set up in lines
Stanza
in a poem, a group of consecutive lines which forms a single unit
exact rhyme
perfect rhyme, such as buzz and fuzz
Sonnet 73
Shakespeare: I' getting old and you still love me.
Refrain
The repetition of one or more phrases or lines at definite intervals in a poem, usually at the end of a stanza
tone
the attitude of the writer or speaker towards the subject of the poem of audience; when we speech, inflections of voice portrays tone
We never know how high we are
Emily Dickinson
enjambment
run on line, a line with no punctuation
Folk Ballad
A short, musical, narrative poem with an oral tradition, often about tragic love or heroism
After being a lifelong agnostic, s/he embraced Catholicism
Claude McKay
Perfect Rhyme
Exact match between vowel and final consonant
Nature's first green is gold
Her hardest hue to hold
Limerick
a 5 line poem, tells a funny/silly story; lines 1, 2, & 5 rhyme, lines 3 & 4 rhyme and are usually shorter than the others
internal rhyme
when the rhyming are located in some combination at the beginning, middle, and end instead at the very end
end rhyme
when the rhyming words come at the ends of lines
Free verse
poetry which does not have a regular rhythm, rhyme scheme, or form. Some free verse poems also do not use punctuation or capitalization, or they otherwise break the rules of grammar
extended metaphor
2 things compared at some length and in several ways
dramatic monologue
poetry by one speaker at a critical moment in an event, usually including self-revelation by the speaker
Verse
a line of words making a unit of poetry
Literal language
A form of language in which writers and speakers mean exactly what their words denote.
Foot
a basic unit of meter consisting of a set number of strong stresses and light stresses, such as a pentameter.
Verbal irony
the actual meaning of a statement that is different from (often opposite of) what the statement literally says
synaesthesia
a literary device that uses one of the senses to portray figuratively another sense. "Delicious strains of music" or "Prickly laugh"
Setting
The time and place of a literary work that establishes its context.
First Person
The narrator is a character in the story who can reveal only personal thoughts and feelings and what he or she sees and is told by other characters. He can't tell us thoughts of other characters.
rhyme pattern
the arrangment of rhymes in a poem or stanza
Synecdoche
A figure of speech in which a part is used for the whole
mono, di, tri, tetra, pent, hex, hept, oct
prefixes for meter
concrete poem
a poem in which the words are arranged to create a picture that relates to the content of the poem
metrical foot
a group of 2 or 3 syllables forming the basic unit of poetic rhythm
William Blake, Chimney Sweeper: Experience
"Where are thy father and mother? say?"
"They are both gone up to the church to pray.
Petrarchan Sonnet AKA Italian Sonnet
Divided into 2 units of octave and sestet abbaaabba cdccdc or cdecde
(My Heart's In The Highlands,) Robert Burns
My heart's in the Highlands, my heart is not here,
My heart's in the Highlands a-chasing the deer -
A-chasing the wild deer, and following the roe;
My heart's in the Highlands, wherever I go.
Farewell to the Highlands, farewell to the North
The birth place of Valour, the country of Worth;
Wherever I wander, wherever I rove,
The hills of the Highlands for ever I love.
Farewell to the mountains high cover'd with snow;
Farewell to the straths and green valleys below;
Farewell to the forrests and wild-hanging woods;
Farwell to the torrents and loud-pouring floods.
My heart's in the Highlands, my heart is not here,
My heart's in the Highlands a-chasing the deer
Chasing the wild deer, and following the roe;
My heart's in the Highlands, whereever I go.
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