Poetry Test Flashcards

Terms Definitions
TPCASTD
title,paraphrase,connotation,attitude,shifts,tone,devices
Cross
Langston Hughes
denotation
dictionary definition
five senses
sense
couplet
two line stanza
Elegy-
deals with death
v., disregarded or unnoticed
Unheeded
balm
anything healing or soothing
hyperbole
obvious and intentional exaggeration
octave
a group of eight lines
simile
comparison using like or as
Repetition of vowel sounds within words
Assonance
situational irony
something that shouldn't normally happen does happens
epithet
an adjective or other descriptive phrase to characterize a person place or thing
consonance
repitition of middle or final consanant sounds in neighboring words
Polysyndenton
The repetition of conjunctions in close succession for rhetorical effect (the, the)
Tone
the poet's attitude towards the material or readers
Fixed Form
has a prescribed metrical arrangement, rhyme sceme, number of lines
dramatic poem
a poem involving many characteristics of a play, a definite setting, a dramatic situation, vigorous speech, and an emotional conflict. In *these* poems, a character or characters always speak: sometimes to themselves, to each other, or directly to the reader
assonance
repitition of vowl sound with in words
lyric poem
short poem expressing thoughts and feelings of single speaker. often written in first person; traditionally has song-like immediacy and emotional force.
Line
a succession of notes forming a distinctive sequence
limerick
a light, humorous poem which consists of 5 lines with a rhyme scheme of "aabba"
lyric poetry
highly musical verse that espresses the observataions and feelings of a single speaker
spondee
A metrical foot consisting of two syllables equally or almost equally accented (for example, true-blue).
haiku
a japanes originated poem5 sylbles, 7 sylbles, 5 sylbles
Personification
objects and animals are given human characteristics
concrete
representing or applied to an actual substance or thing, as opposed to an abstract quality:
Apostrophe
Direct address to a person not present or an inanimate object.
paraphrase
restatement of the content of a poem to make its prose meaning clearer
synecdoche
figure of speech in which the part represents the whole
verbal irony
a writer, speaker, or character says one thing but means another
dramatic poetry
poetry that involves the techniques of drama; one or more characters speak to other characters who may or may not be present in the poem
iambic pentameter
a common meter in poetry consisting of an unrhymed line with five feet or accents, each foot containing an unaccented syllable and an accented syllable
Alliteration
The repititon of a consonant sound in a line of verse or prose.
Stanza
arrangement of a certain # of lines, usually 4 or more, sometimes having a fixed length, meter, or rhyme scheme, forming a division of a poem
elipsis
when there are words left out of a sentence, but you still know the excluded words
do not go gentle into that good night
dylan thomas
sestet
six line poem or stanza or last 6 lines of an Italian or Petrarchan Sonnet
onomatopoeia
use of a word whose sound imitates or suggests its meaning
metaphor
a figure of speech in which one thing is the equivalent of another, usually using the word "is"
dactyl
: A stressed syllable followed by two unstressed ones, as in FLUT-ter-ing or BLUE-ber-ry. The following playful lines illustrate double dactyls, two dactyls per line:Higgledy, piggledy,Emily DickinsonGibbering, jabbering.
sensory details
-writing or speech that appeals to one or more sense
What do the similies add to youre?
it adds description/ imagery
Approximate Rime
A term used for words in a riming pattern that have some kind of sound correspondence but are not perfect rimes
Ex. Push-Rush
IRONIC POINT OF VIEW
Sensing one thing when the writer is actually saying another
What is concrete poetry & when did it take place?
Combination of visual art & typed words.Words themselves become part of the poetry. Use of space as an element of composition.Circa '50's.
hapless
unlucky
iambic
unstressed, stressed
league
3 miles
narrative
telling a story
Figures of Speech:
Apostrophe
forms
a type of peom
Ekphrasis
response to visual art
une bouilloire (e)lectrique
an electric kettle
Stanzas
Verses in a poem. (or song)
emily dickinson
much madness is divinest sense
metrical tale
any story told in verse
ballad
a song transmitted orally from generation to generation that tells a story and is eventually written down
meter
generally regular pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables in poetry
Narrative Poetry
a poem that tells a story
refrain
one or more words repeated at intervals ion a poem, usually at the end of a stanza, such as the last line of each stanza in a ballad. used to present different moods or ideas, as in Poe's, "Nevermore".
Conflict
A struggle between opposing forces in a story or play, usually resolved by the end of the work. It may occur within a character as well as between characters.
Dramatic
Tells story with authors own thoughts or statements
Irony
An expression by using language that normally signifies the opposite for a humorous or emphatic effect
The Fireside Poets
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
19th century America
response to slavery
Harlem Renaissance Poetry1st competitors against British
William Cullen Bryant
copied english stle
idiom
the characteristic language style of a person or a group of people
the regular pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables that can establish the rhythm in a poem
meter
Cacophony
When a word (or words) produces a noisy or unpleasant effect. This may happen from the true sound of the word, the word's meaning, or it may happen based on the rhythm of line structure and/or word groupings.
Allusion
A reference to a well known person, place, event, literary work, or work of art.
Paradox
a situation or feeling that appears to be contradictory but on inspection turns out to be true or at least make sense
Epic
a long narrative poem telling of a hero's deeds
verse
a name for a line of traditional poetry written in meter
Synesthesia
The merging or mixing of two sensory experiences to create an image: "hearing" a "color"
Imagery
The language that appeals to the five senses and creates images in our minds.
Monometer
a line of verse consisting of one metrical foot
Percy Bysshe Shelley
Poems: Ode to the West Wind Ozymandias
language
choice of words or style of writing; diction:
rhyme scheme
the pattern of rhyming ina poem; to describe the pattern, each line is assigned a letter, and lines at ends of lines of a poem
repetition
a use of any element of language- a sound, a word, a phrase, a grammatical structure- more than once.
Repitition of sound at the beginning to nearby words.
What is alliteration?
Literary Ballad
story told in verse in which a known writer imitates a folk ballad
A crude of shocking word of expression used in place of socially accepted language. It is the opposite of euphemism.
Figures of Speech:
Wyatt, They Flee From ME
women are compared to animals he has hunted, but now are wild and gone from his life
wayfarers
Travelers
Heptameter
seven feet
alexandrine
six feet
tercet
three lines
odious
adjective: repulsive
allegory
an extended metaphor
Harryette Mullen
"Dim Lady"
iocor, iocari, iocatus
joke
dactylic
stressed unstressed unstressed
William Blake
The Chimney Sweep
Blank Verse
unrhymed iambic pentamenter
Yeats
Who Goes with Fergus?
Free verse poem
no boundaries
epitaph
brief poetic inscription (gravestones, memorials, etc)
Monosyllabic
1 accented- single syllable word
Ode
poem praising someone or something
Edgar Allen Poe
Annabell Lee rhythm
symbolism
when something represents something else
rhyme
occurrence of similar/different sounds at the end of 2 or more words
Theogony
by Hesiod750 B.C.Classical\"Let us begin our song with the Helikonian Muses\"
dimeter
verse consisting of 2 metrical feet
sonnet
Prosody. a poem, properly expressive of a single, complete thought, idea, or sentiment, of 14 lines, usually in iambic pentameter, with rhymes arranged according to one of certain definite schemes, being in the strict or Italian form divided into a major group of 8 lines (the octave) followed by a minor group of 6 lines (the sestet), and in a common English form into 3 quatrains followed by a couplet.
mottled
marked with spots of different color
Sonnet 18
William Shakespeare, around 1600, modern English
Stevens
Idea of Order at Key West
rhythm
the regular alternation of stressed and unstressed syllables. (virtually synonymous with the more specific and technical term, meter). all spoken and written language has this.
vivid verbs
specific and therefore powerful verbs
first
"i" is [blank] person point of view
climax
the point of highest tension and greatest interest for you
iamb
an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed one. (the foot)
Cinquain
a short poem consisting of five, usually unrhymed lines containing, respectively, two, four, six, eight, and two syllables
oxymoron
a figure of speech with contradictory terms
Diction
Word choice - specifically, any word that is important to the meaning and the effect of a passage.
spondaic
a metrical foot consisting of 2 stressed syllables
Metonymy
A measured pattern of rhythmic accents in poems. A figure of speech in which a closely related term is substituted for an object or idea.
overstatement
an exaggeration for the sake of emphasis and is not to be taken literally
Parlous
(adj) full of danger or risk; hazardous
Protagonist
A certain character that tries to achieve a certain goal
Poetry
Language that is sung chanted spoken or written according to some recurrence that emphasizes the relationship of words according to sound as well as meaning
supise endings
end strongly with a unexpeted ending.
concrete diction
words that specifically name or describe things or persons; refers to what we can immediately perceive with our senses
trope
figure of language that depends on describing something in terms of something else. Ex: "I made a killing" doesn't mean someone just killed somebody
Winter
"Tu-whit, tu-who! A merry note, while greasy Joan doth keel the pot"
Smile
a figure of speech which directly compares two unlike objects using like or as
figurative
when words that usually don't go together are put together in a poetic or imaginative way
litotes
understatement, esp. that in which an affirmative is expressed by the negative of its contrary, as in "not bad at all."
catharsis
the effect of poetry to allow a release of emotions, especially through fear and tragedy.
didactic poetry
poetry designed to teach an ethical, moral, or religious lesson
free verse
unrhymed verse that has either no metrical pattern or an irregular pattern
Syllables
Break down of a word into phonetic parts (ex. "M-ck-enna" - 3 syllables)
symbol
a person place or thing that stands for something more than itself
Theme
A central message or insight into life revealed through a literary work.
pun
play on words based on similarity of sound between 2 words with different meanings
alternating rhyme
ABAB rhyme scheme (end of alternating lines rhyme)
Assonance:
The repetition or a pattern of similar sounds, especially vowel sounds, as in the tongue twister "Moses supposes his toeses are roses."
Figurative Language
Words and phrases that help readers picture things in new ways. For example, "Snow crystals displayed a rainbow of colors in the sun".
internal rhyme
Rhyme that occurs within a line, rather than at the end
trochee
a foot of two syllables, a long followed by a short in quantitative meter, or a stressed followed by an unstressed in accentual meter.
off/half/near/slant rhyme
rhyme words with changes in the vowel sound and/or the concluding consonants
crag
steep rugged rock that juts out from a rock mass
connotation
the emotion that a word or phrase may arouse sports wear vs. chap clothes
feminine rhyme
two words that rhyme that have more than one syllable (tragic magic)
literal language
A form of language in which writers and speakers mean exactly what their words denote.
Ann Tyson
Who took care of wordsworth after his mom died?
persona
the narrator of or a character in a literary work, sometimes identified with the author.
Quatrain
A stanza or poem made up of four lines with rhythm or rhyme.
End-Stop line
to end a line with a punctuation mark, thus calling attention to the line as a structure within the poem
iambic pentameter
a line of poetry made up of 5 iambs. iamb is a metrical foot with unstressed syllables followed by stressed
End rhyme
rhyme that occurs at the end of two or more lines of poetry
To a Mouse, Robert Burns
An' lea'e us nought but grief an' pain,
For promis'd joy!
infant, school boy, the lover, soldier, justice, pantaloon, second childness
What are the seven stages in seven ages of man
grisly
Horrible.
stress
accent
One Foot
Monometer
Dreams
Langston Hughes
amphimacer
stressed, unstressed, stressed
AT/ti/TUDE
anapest
unstressed, unstressed, stressed
Those winter sundays
Robert Hayden
Cancion del pirata
Jose de Espronceda/Espana
Idyll
short descriptive and describes setting, descriptive term. lyric poem describing the life of the shepherd in pastoral, bucolic, idealistic terms
the road not taken
robert frost
euphony
any agreeable (pleasing and harmonious) sounds
feminine ending
ending line on unstressed syllable
Lyric
The words feelings or emotions expressed through diction and metre in musical quality
Something Childish, But Very Natural
Samuel Coleridge
dialogue
conversation between two or more people
masculine rhyme
rhymes of one stressed syllable
i wandered lonely as a cloud
wordsworth
The Author's Epitaph
by Sir Walter Raleigh1628Classical\"Every such is time, which takes in trust\"\"The Lord shall raise me up, I trust\"
end rhymes
rhyme at the end of lines
connotative meaning
the meaning suggested by the associations or emotions triggered by a word or phrase
juxtaposition
the act of positioning close together (or side by side)
Dectyllic hexameter
used by most ancient greek poets
extended metaphor
an implied analogy, or comparison, which is carried throughout a stanza or an entire poem.
Imperfect rhyme
(approximate or slant rhyme) involves words that sound similar, but are not exactly the same
Pyrrhic
a foot consisting of two unstressed syllables
elegy
meditation on death or another solemn theme
Image
A concrete representation of a sense impression, a feeling, or an idea.
Narrative Poem
A poem that tells a story.
identity
constructed --> formed and shaped by others
soliloquy
an address within a dramatic piece in which a character converses with himself or herself, revealing his or her thoughts to the audience without addressing another person on stage
personifacation
giving human traits to someone that is non- human.
inversion
the inversion of the usual order of words
foot
each unit of meter; consists of a combination of stressed and unstessed syllables scan; note the stresseed and unstressed syllables in poetry.
Accentual-Syllabic verse
an extension of accentual verse which fixes both the number of stresses and syllables within a line or stanza.
Italian sonnet
(petrarchan) an octave of abba abba and a sestet of cdecde or some variant
Antithesis (syntax)
two statements that show a contrast through the balancing of two opposite ideas.
Aliteration
the repitition of the intial letter or sound in two or more words in a line
mood
the feeling created in the reader
by a literary work or passage
epic poem
a long narrative poem telling of a hero's deeds
literary allusion
a reference to a person, place, or thing from previous literature
Subject
The overall topic of the poem (on the surface level.)
auditory image
something described in terms of how it sounds
End-stopping
in poetry, a line ending in a full pause, often indicated by appropriate punctuation such as a period or semicolon.
Open Form
A type of structure or form in poetry characterized by freedom from regularity and consistency in such elements as rhyme, line length, metrical pattern, and overall poetic structure
Thomas Nashe, Adieu, Farewell Earth's Bliss
Worms feed on Hector brave;
eye rhyme
looks like a rhyme but is not , Depends on spelling rather than sound; words that look like they should rhyme, but do not
Zeugma
use of a word to modifiy two or more words although the use is gramatically correct with only one.
Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner
highly imagistic, the idea of impulse getting a man in trouble and then having to live with the guilt
Andrew Marvell, To His Coy Mistress
Of Humber would complain. I would
Love you ten years before the Flood,
Petrarchan / Italian Sonnet
Has an octave and a sestet; Usually a question is posed in the octave and answered in sestet
Who is the author to "Induction to the Mirror for Magistrates"
Traditionally the impetus and planning for the entire work has been ascribed to Thomas Sackville. As he was only eighteen years old at the time of the first edition this seems unlikely, and his is listed as a contributor only in the third edition of 1563. The reason for Sackville receiving much of the credit for the work is in part that he was the most famous of the writers to work on the Mirror but also because his contributions, Induction and The Complaint of Henry Duke of Buckingham, are often the only ones regarded as having any lasting literary merit. Another reason for the ascription to Sackville is due to the reorganisations the work underwent in later editions, giving accidental prominence to Sackville's sections and confusing later readers.
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