Romeo and Juliet Act II Vocabulary Flashcards

Standardized Tests
Terms Definitions
lamentable
distressing
shrift
confession
repos
clam;peacfuleness
devouring
destroying
lame
slow
part
quality
suffer
allow
frank
generous
watch
wakefulness
Repose
Calm; Peacefulness
confounds
confused; obscures
Grievance
(n) affliction
procure
get; obtain
benedicite
bless you
Discourses
Talks; Speaks
slip
fake coin
feign
make appear
vast
Enormous, Immense
inconstant
adj. changeable
great dangers
peril
rancour
a bitter hate
fishified
like a fish
grudge
n. deep dislike
unadvised
thoughtlessly, hastily without counsel
predominant
most frequent or common
cunning
n. skill in deception
Driveling
talking nonsense, babble, not comprehendible
heir
to take the place of
conjure
to use magic to make appear
Perjuries
Lies; Swearing to what is untrue
Romeo
Who overhears Juliet speaking aloud her loving thoughts of Romeo?
allusion
A passing reference, the authors mention of something directly or meant to be naturally understood by the readers
entreat
to ask earnestly; to implore or beg
sallow
of a sickly yellowish hue or complexion
herald
an official crier or messenger, to come out and express
O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?
Deny thy father and refuse thy name;
Or, if thou wilt not, be but sworn my love,
And I'll no longer be a Capulet.
Juliet
Friar Lawrence
Identify the speaker: "Come, come with me, and we will make short work; For, by your leaves, you shall not stay alone Till Holy Church incorporate two in one."
conjure (v)
I. To swear together; to conspire.
a. To swear together; to make a privy compact by an oath; to form a conspiracy; to conspire.
intercession
the act of pleading in behalf of another
Parody
something so badly done it seems to be an intentional mockery
Who does Juliet send to give Romeo get the message from him?
She sends her nurse.
What does the nurse think of Romeo?
He is good looking but not the best choice.
benefice
revenue
consort
to associate
Blaze
to make public
discourse
to narrate or discuss
Mercutio
"Actors often prefer Mercutio's mocking wit to the blander and less biting lyricism of Romeo."
-William Rose Benet
envious
feeling, expressing or characterized by envy
Where does act II begin?
an orchard
canker-worm
worm that feeds on fruit and garbage
vile
adj. causing or able to cause nausea
In Act II, Scene iii, Friar Lawrence says, "For naught so vile that on earth doth/live But to the earth some special good doth give;" By vile he means ________
disgusting
poultice
a soft, moist mass of bread, meal, clay or other substance
Rosaline
Who does Mercutio use to try to draw Romeo out after the party
How does Juliet "speak, yet...[say] nothing"?
her beauty is so "loud"
Why does Friar agree to marry them?
thinks it will end the feud
What is Friar Lawrence's first response to Romeo's declaration of love?
He thinks Romeo is a waverer (flakey guy-always changes his mind).
What excuse does Juliet use for going to Friar Lawrence's cell?
She needs to go to shrift (confession).
What is Friar Lawrence's specialty or hobby?
He is an expert on plants - both beneficial and poinsonous.
wanton
deliberate
Forsworn
denied/forsaken/renounced
wild-goose chase
cross-country riding
idolatry
extreme love for someone/something
rancor
n. deep, bitter resentment
languish
to become weak or feeble
Calamity
a great misfortune or disaster
demesnes
a position of land by one's own
Philosophy
The study of human behavior, thought, and knowledge
This character gives up on looking for Romeo because he believes he does not want to be found.
Benvolio
what kind of man does Mercutio mark Tybalt as
fiery
What does Romeo compare Juliet to when he sees her on the balcony?
the sun
unaware of his presence, what does Juliet ask Romeo to say?
to disown his name (Montague)
II.Prologue How can Romeo and Juliet overcome the barriers between them?
"passion lends them power, time means, to meet
Tempering extremities with extreme sweet"
II.ii What does Juliet wish she could do all night long?
"Good night, good night! parting is such
sweet sorrow,
That I shall say good night till it be morrow"
II.v What are old folks, according to Juliet?
"old folks, many feign as they were dead;
Unwieldy, slow, heavy and pale as lead"
II.ii What does Romeo say two stars could do?
"Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven,
Having some business, do entreat her eyes
To twinkle in their spheres till they return.
What if her eyes were there, they in her head?
The brightness of her cheek would shame those stars,
As daylight doth a lamp; her eyes in heaven
Would through the airy region stream so bright
That birds would sing and think it were not night"
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