Literature Study Guides1984Book 2 Chapter 2 Summary

1984 | Study Guide

George Orwell

Download a PDF to print or study offline.

Study Guide
Cite This Study Guide

How to Cite This Study Guide

quotation mark graphic
MLA

Bibliography

Course Hero. "1984 Study Guide." Course Hero. 28 July 2016. Web. 14 Nov. 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/1984/>.

In text

(Course Hero)

APA

Bibliography

Course Hero. (2016, July 28). 1984 Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved November 14, 2018, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/1984/

In text

(Course Hero, 2016)

Chicago

Bibliography

Course Hero. "1984 Study Guide." July 28, 2016. Accessed November 14, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/1984/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "1984 Study Guide," July 28, 2016, accessed November 14, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/1984/.

Book 2 | Chapter 2

Course Hero's video study guide provides in-depth summary and analysis of Book 2 | Chapter 2 of George Orwell's novel 1984.

1984 | Book 2, Chapter 2 | Summary

Share
Share

Summary

Winston and Julia meet in the shade of bushes, away from telescreens and hidden microphones. Winston steps into "pools of gold," walks across ground that is "misty with bluebells," and listens to a bird with a speckled breast singing. Despite the privacy of their surroundings, they keep their voices low. Julia (whose name readers finally learn) is 15 years younger than Winston but is attracted to him because she's detected that he also hates the Party. The Party wants sexual relations to be free of desire, so the couple's sexual attraction becomes political, and their climax is a victory.

Analysis

Orwell creates a very different scene for Winston and Julia's rendezvous. The description of the place they meet—"pools of gold," "misty with bluebells"—is the only vision of beauty so far in the novel.

It's also in this chapter where Winston realizes that he and Julia have committed a crime against the Party. He is pessimistic about their future now and says, "We are the dead."

A thrush alights on a nearby branch, sings, and then takes flight. The bird is a symbol of the freedom Winston and Julia are playing at but have not achieved. Winston is just like the bird that can't stop singing, except he can't fly away.

Cite This Study Guide

information icon Have study documents to share about 1984? Upload them to earn free Course Hero access!