Literature Study GuidesA Connecticut Yankee In King Arthurs Court

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court | Study Guide

Mark Twain

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Course Hero. "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court Study Guide." Course Hero. 22 Mar. 2018. Web. 18 July 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/A-Connecticut-Yankee-in-King-Arthurs-Court/>.

In text

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Course Hero. (2018, March 22). A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved July 18, 2018, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/A-Connecticut-Yankee-in-King-Arthurs-Court/

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(Course Hero, 2018)

Chicago

Bibliography

Course Hero. "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court Study Guide." March 22, 2018. Accessed July 18, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/A-Connecticut-Yankee-in-King-Arthurs-Court/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court Study Guide," March 22, 2018, accessed July 18, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/A-Connecticut-Yankee-in-King-Arthurs-Court/.

Overview

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court infographic thumbnail

Author

Mark Twain

Year Published

1889

Type

Novel

Genre

Comedy

Perspective and Narrator

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court is told from the first-person perspective. There are three narrators. The opening unnamed narrator (presumably Twain) tells the framing story, a story within which one or more tales is related. The majority of the novel is told through 19th-century Connecticut resident Hank Morgan's perspective. A single chapter near the end of the book is told through 6th-century English resident Clarence's perspective. The unnamed narrator returns to conclude the story in the final chapter.

Tense

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court is written in the past tense.

About the Title

The primary narrator Hank is an American from Connecticut who accidentally ends up in King Arthur's court. The word Yankee originally was used as an English insult toward Americans. Using the word in the title A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court emphasizes one of Twain's themes: the contrast between English or European ideas and American ideas.

Summary

This study guide and infographic for Mark Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court offer summary and analysis on themes, symbols, and other literary devices found in the text. Explore Course Hero's library of literature materials, including documents and Q&A pairs.

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