Download a PDF to print or study offline.

Study Guide
Cite This Study Guide

How to Cite This Study Guide

quotation mark graphic
MLA

Bibliography

Course Hero. "A Farewell to Arms Study Guide." Course Hero. 28 July 2016. Web. 20 Apr. 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/A-Farewell-to-Arms/>.

In text

(Course Hero)

APA

Bibliography

Course Hero. (2016, July 28). A Farewell to Arms Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved April 20, 2018, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/A-Farewell-to-Arms/

In text

(Course Hero, 2016)

Chicago

Bibliography

Course Hero. "A Farewell to Arms Study Guide." July 28, 2016. Accessed April 20, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/A-Farewell-to-Arms/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "A Farewell to Arms Study Guide," July 28, 2016, accessed April 20, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/A-Farewell-to-Arms/.

A Farewell to Arms | Discussion Questions 51 - 51

Share
Share

How does Hemingway's spare writing style affect his representation of war in Farewell to Arms?

Hemingway's spare style gives a sense of immediacy to the text, making readers feel as if the scenes are happening to them and thus making the war seem more horrific. He uses few adjectives, and his short sentences have a strong sense of rhythm. He also uses repetition often. For example, in the description, "There was a great splashing and I saw the star-shells go up and burst and float whitely and rockets going up and heard the bombs," the only adjective is great, an understatement for the sound of a shell landing in a river. The "star-shells" seem almost like fireworks as they "burst and float whitely." The word and, used five times, gives a sense of continuous action, so that readers hardly need the words that end the description: "all this in a moment."

Cite This Study Guide

information icon Have study documents to share about A Farewell to Arms? Upload them to earn free Course Hero access!

Ask a homework question - tutors are online