A Streetcar Named Desire | Study Guide

Tennessee Williams

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Course Hero. "A Streetcar Named Desire Study Guide." Course Hero. 13 Oct. 2016. Web. 18 July 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/A-Streetcar-Named-Desire/>.

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Course Hero. "A Streetcar Named Desire Study Guide." October 13, 2016. Accessed July 18, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/A-Streetcar-Named-Desire/.

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Course Hero, "A Streetcar Named Desire Study Guide," October 13, 2016, accessed July 18, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/A-Streetcar-Named-Desire/.

A Streetcar Named Desire | Infographic

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Check out this Infographic to learn more about Tennessee Williams's A Streetcar Named Desire. Study visually with character maps, plot summaries, helpful context, and more.

a-streetcar-named-desire-tennessee-williamsSources: Biography.com, Colby Sawyer College, Encyclopaedia Britannica, Internet Broadway DatabaseCopyright © 2016 Course Hero, Inc.EuniceStellas high-strungupstairs neighborMitchStanleys sensitive friend and poker buddy; attracted to BlancheSteveEunices husband and Stanleys poker buddyStella KowalskiBlanches passionate, down-to-earth sisterBlanche DuBoisFragile, self-deludedSouthern belleFriendshipAntagonistMarriedFamilyMain CharactersStanley KowalskiVolatile, physically abusive, working-class manA Streetcar Named Desireby the NumbersYear the play won the Pulitzer Prize for DramaPerformances in the plays first run on Broadway (1947–49)Oscars won by the 1951 film version starring Marlon Brando and Vivien LeighWilliamss age when he changed his first name to Tennessee from Thomas2819488554Blanche, Scene 11have always depended on the kindness of strangers.Williams grew up in a strained household and suffered bouts of depression, which would eventually form the major themes of his plays. At age 28 Williams escaped to New Orleans, where he embraced the Southern culture that would inspire A Streetcar Named Desire.TENNESSEE WILLIAMS1911–83AuthorTruth vs. IllusionStanleys zealous unveiling of Blanches lies and self-deceptionstrips away her illusions, leaving her exposed and unhinged.RepressionBlanche and Stanley appear to despise each other without acknowledging their mutual attraction and the sexual tension between them.PassionPassion reveals itself in Stella and Stanleys steamy marriage, Blanches desperate sexual exploits, and Stanleys volatile outbursts.MotifsBelle ReveBelle Reve represents the net of lies and illusions Blanche weaves and the “beautiful dream” shes unwilling to relinquish.Varsouviana PolkaThis style of music represents the pain Blanche feels when shemust face her past—and the disaster it brings.Blue PianoAppearing when passions rise and hope fades, the blue piano symbolizes desire and loss.Set in the 1940s, A Streetcar Named Desire follows Blanche DuBoiss journey from fragility and pretense to truth in bohemian New Orleans. Raised with her sister Stella as a Southern belle, she is shockedyet intrigued—by Stanley, her sisters brutally sexual husband. As he unravels her lies, her illusions shatter, and she comes unglued.Pretense, Desire, and PassionTHEMESTennessee Williams1947EnglishPlayAuthorFirst PerformedOriginal LanguageA Streetcar Named DesireDrama

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