All the Bright Places | Study Guide

Jennifer Niven

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Course Hero. "All the Bright Places Study Guide." Course Hero. 7 Apr. 2018. Web. 19 Sep. 2018. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/All-the-Bright-Places/>.

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Course Hero. "All the Bright Places Study Guide." April 7, 2018. Accessed September 19, 2018. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/All-the-Bright-Places/.

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Course Hero, "All the Bright Places Study Guide," April 7, 2018, accessed September 19, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/All-the-Bright-Places/.

All the Bright Places | Part 2, Chapters 48–50 | Summary

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Summary

Part 2, Chapter 48: VIOLET March 21 and beyond

Violet arrives to see Finch, who looks different again. His room is still bare, and his eyes "are brighter than the other night." She tells him she has questions, but he lounges "sexily against the door" and tells her he has questions first. They flirt, have dinner, and she gives him a birthday present. It's a first edition of The Waves, which she has inscribed to him with the words, "You make me feel gold, flowing too. I love you. Ultraviolet Remarkey-able." Eventually, as they talk, Violet starts crying. She shares her worries about what Amanda told her, and Finch pulls away. He tells her he doesn't need help and says, "I'm not Eleanor. Just because you couldn't save her, don't try to save me." They fight and she leaves. At home Violet tells her parents the truth: that he saved her when she was on the ledge, that she's still seeing him, and how desperately he needs help. She thinks she hears rocks against her window that night, but she doesn't get up.

Violet spends the next day "obsessively checking Facebook." While her mother tries to reach Mrs. Finch, her father reaches out to a psychiatrist he knows. The psychiatrist does reach Finch's younger sister, Decca. Violet sends Finch a message telling him she's sorry, but he doesn't reply.

School on Monday includes conversations with Ryan Cross about college and with Mr. Black about the "Wander Indiana" project. On Tuesday Violet still hasn't heard from Finch. She goes to his house, looking around his room for "something, anything he might have left to let me know where he's gone." She talks to Decca, who says her brother just "does that sometimes" but he "always comes back." Violet is not calmed by this, and she calls him again—to no reply.

Part 2, Chapter 49: FINCH Day 80 (a muthaf#@*ing world record)

Finch ponders a Robert Lowell poem and the death of the cardinal, and he thinks about things he remembers. He remembers running "to a nursery of flowers," Violet's smile, and her hand in his.

Part 2, Chapter 50: VIOLET The rest of March

Violet receives a series of texts from Finch. She replies, "My boyfriend is a missing person. Please call me." His response is, "Not missing at all. Found." She replies, asking where he is. Violet's father isn't speaking to her much; her mother is continuing to try to help and communicate with Violet. Mrs. Markey learns from Mrs. Finch that Finch checks in with her and that he promises to do so every week. Mrs. Finch believes there is no need to call the psychiatrists or the police. Violet thinks that at school she is the "only one who seems to notice he's gone." Violet tries to move on with her life, attending classes and working on Germ. She hears from colleges, messages Finch, and feels frustrated that Mrs. Finch is so calm about his absence. Finch sends five more texts over several days, "And then everything goes quiet."

Analysis

This section of the book is very much transitional. The goodbye, the last time Violet will see Finch before his death, is romantic in parts. There is no indication that he's going to leave or die at this point.

Mrs. Finch cannot accept that her son needs help. The sheer refusal to see his difficulties is as much of a factor as his father's abuse. Finch has people in his life who could force him to get help, but they do not do so.

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