An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding | Study Guide

David Hume

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Course Hero, "An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding Study Guide," February 24, 2018, accessed September 25, 2018, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/An-Enquiry-Concerning-Human-Understanding/.

An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding | Glossary

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causal inference: an inference drawn about events where the first event is said to be the cause and the second event is said to be the effect. It is also known as an inductive inference.

constant conjunction: Hume's phrase for the empirical observations that lead the mind to form the idea of a causal connection between objects and events

custom: Hume's explanation of the idea of causation as the product of conditioning or habituated expectation

empiricism: the theory that experience is the source of all knowledge

epistemology: the study of the nature and basis of human knowledge

idea: a copy of a sense impression

impression: an internal or external sensation. Hume claims that impressions are the sole origin of knowledge.

inductive inference: an inference drawn about events where the first event is said to be the cause and the second event is said to be the effect. It is also known as a causal inference.

matters of fact: experiential judgments and experiential inferences. Hume uses the phrase "matter of fact" to refer to all experiential propositions.

relations of ideas: demonstrative judgments and nonexperiential inferences. Hume uses the phrase "relations of ideas" to refer to all propositions understood entirely by the way ideas relate to each other, as they do in mathematics.

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