Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community | Study Guide

Robert Putnam

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Course Hero. "Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community Study Guide." Course Hero. 6 Feb. 2018. Web. 19 June 2021. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Bowling-Alone-The-Collapse-and-Revival-of-American-Community/>.

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Course Hero. (2018, February 6). Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved June 19, 2021, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Bowling-Alone-The-Collapse-and-Revival-of-American-Community/

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Course Hero. "Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community Study Guide." February 6, 2018. Accessed June 19, 2021. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Bowling-Alone-The-Collapse-and-Revival-of-American-Community/.

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Course Hero, "Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community Study Guide," February 6, 2018, accessed June 19, 2021, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Bowling-Alone-The-Collapse-and-Revival-of-American-Community/.

Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community | Chapter Summaries

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Chapter Summaries Chart

Chapter Summary
Section 1, Chapter 1 Putnam starts this first chapter with an emotional story of the breakup of a bridge club: "No one is left from the Glenn... Read More
Section 2, Chapter 2 According to Putnam, while Americans in 2000 were more politically involved than people in many other countries, the rat... Read More
Section 2, Chapter 3 Civic organizations, says Putnam, are associations that can be broken into three groups: community-based, church-based, ... Read More
Section 2, Chapter 4 According to Putnam, the United States is "one of the most religiously observant countries in the contemporary world." R... Read More
Section 2, Chapter 5 Putnam examines the idea that social connections in the workplace could be taking the place of social connections in civ... Read More
Section 2, Chapter 6 Putnam starts off this chapter by describing two types of social individuals termed, in Yiddish, machers and schmoozers.... Read More
Section 2, Chapter 7 Is doing good for people by donating money or goods likely to increase social capital? Putnam addresses this question an... Read More
Section 2, Chapter 8 Putnam explores changes that have occurred in Americans' trust in one another. Citing the golden rule (do unto others as... Read More
Section 2, Chapter 9 Putnam examines three types of social organizations that actually increased in number during the last quarter of the 20t... Read More
Section 3, Chapter 10 Though Americans at the start of the 20th century are more civically engaged than people in many other countries, they a... Read More
Section 3, Chapter 11 Putnam starts his investigation into why American civic engagement has dropped by examining the most obvious possibility... Read More
Section 3, Chapter 12 Putnam explores the question of whether Americans' mobility during the last quarter of the 20th century could account fo... Read More
Section 3, Chapter 13 Putnam in this chapter asks whether technology and mass media are lowering Americans' ability and desire to engage in ci... Read More
Section 3, Chapter 14 In this chapter Putnam explores the possibility that generational change is the major reason for civic disengagement. As... Read More
Section 3, Chapter 15 Putnam sums up his findings in this chapter, adding reviews of a few possible culprits for civic disengagement. These po... Read More
Section 4, Chapter 16 Putnam says Americans have a visceral, or gut, sense that social ties are eroding—and that this is a problem for contemp... Read More
Section 4, Chapter 17 Putnam believes "child development is powerfully shaped by social capital" and makes the claim "social capital keeps bad... Read More
Section 4, Chapter 18 Putnam argues that neighborhoods with "high levels of social capital tend to be good places to raise children." He argue... Read More
Section 4, Chapter 19 According to Putnam, social capital (strong social connections through personal contacts and organizations) is not only ... Read More
Section 4, Chapter 20 Health and well-being, says Putnam, are strongly tied to social connectedness. In fact, he says, suicide is "a sociologi... Read More
Section 4, Chapter 21 Representative democracy—America's form of government—requires the participation of citizens. Putnam describes how early... Read More
Section 4, Chapter 22 In this chapter, Putnam addresses the "dark side" of social capital by quoting from the book Babbitt by Sinclair Lewis. ... Read More
Section 5, Chapter 23 Putnam asks whether "a variety of social, economic, and technological changes" have made American social capital obsolet... Read More
Section 5, Chapter 24 In his final chapter, Putnam outlines his recommendations for the future. He notes that his book up to this point has be... Read More
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