Literature Study GuidesBrideshead Revisited

Brideshead Revisited | Study Guide

Evelyn Waugh

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MLA

Bibliography

Course Hero. "Brideshead Revisited Study Guide." Course Hero. 26 Apr. 2019. Web. 24 May 2019. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Brideshead-Revisited/>.

In text

(Course Hero)

APA

Bibliography

Course Hero. (2019, April 26). Brideshead Revisited Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved May 24, 2019, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Brideshead-Revisited/

In text

(Course Hero, 2019)

Chicago

Bibliography

Course Hero. "Brideshead Revisited Study Guide." April 26, 2019. Accessed May 24, 2019. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Brideshead-Revisited/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "Brideshead Revisited Study Guide," April 26, 2019, accessed May 24, 2019, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Brideshead-Revisited/.

Overview

Author

Evelyn Waugh

Year Published

1945

Type

Novel

Genre

Drama, Romance, War Literature

Perspective and Narrator

Charles Ryder narrates the novel from a close/limited first-person point of view.

Tense

Brideshead Revisited is told in the past tense.

About the Title

The title refers to the mansion where much of the novel's action takes place. Brideshead is one of the great stately homes of Britain. Charles Ryder, the narrator and protagonist, is a captain in the army and is stationed at Brideshead. He has been here before as the guest of the Flytes, who own Brideshead. Charles "revisits" Brideshead as he recounts his memories of the Flyte family. The book also carries the subtitle "The Sacred and Profane Memories of Captain Charles Ryder." Sacred and profane are opposites described by sociologist Émile Durkheim (1858–1917) as marking the limits of religion. Sacred aspects of a religion are holy and must be obeyed or observed. Profane ideas and actions corrupt religion. Charles and other Brideshead Revisited characters will struggle with the place of religion in the nonreligious (profane) world.

Summary

This study guide for Evelyn Waugh's Brideshead Revisited offers summary and analysis on themes, symbols, and other literary devices found in the text. Explore Course Hero's library of literature materials, including documents and Q&A pairs.

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