Literature Study GuidesCitizens United V Federal Election Commission

Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission | Study Guide

U.S. Supreme Court

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MLA

Bibliography

Course Hero. "Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission Study Guide." Course Hero. 6 Dec. 2019. Web. 20 Sep. 2020. <https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Citizens-United-v-Federal-Election-Commission/>.

In text

(Course Hero)

APA

Bibliography

Course Hero. (2019, December 6). Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission Study Guide. In Course Hero. Retrieved September 20, 2020, from https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Citizens-United-v-Federal-Election-Commission/

In text

(Course Hero, 2019)

Chicago

Bibliography

Course Hero. "Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission Study Guide." December 6, 2019. Accessed September 20, 2020. https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Citizens-United-v-Federal-Election-Commission/.

Footnote

Course Hero, "Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission Study Guide," December 6, 2019, accessed September 20, 2020, https://www.coursehero.com/lit/Citizens-United-v-Federal-Election-Commission/.

Overview

Author

U.S. Supreme Court

Year Decided

2010

Type

Primary Source

Genre

U.S. Supreme Court Case

At a Glance

  • In a highly contested 5–4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned sections of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act (BCRA) that put limits on election-related spending by corporations and labor unions.
  • Congress passed the BCRA in 2002 in an attempt to limit the influence of campaign contributions by corporations and labor unions on elections.
  • Citizens United brought suit to prevent the Federal Election Commission, which oversees federal elections, from blocking it from showing a documentary critical of a presidential candidate.
  • The five conservative justices on the court decided in favor of Citizens United. They ruled that the BCRA put "onerous" restrictions on the 1st Amendment rights of corporations and labor unions to express their views on public issues.
  • The ruling struck down two prior Supreme Court rulings that had allowed restrictions on this type of spending.
  • In a stinging dissent, Justice John Paul Stevens (1920–2019) argued that the majority's decision posed a threat to the integrity of elections by allowing corporations and labor unions to spend unlimited money that could sway elections.
  • The decision was generally welcomed by conservatives and bitterly objected to by liberals.

Summary

This study guide for U.S. Supreme Court's Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission offers summary and analysis on themes, symbols, and other literary devices found in the text. Explore Course Hero's library of literature materials, including documents and Q&A pairs.

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